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V 






— ■ ■ 



/^ KANS AS STATE 

1. ■ — — . * ■ . : 




THF 
REPUBLICAN 



COLLEGIAN 





KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99, NUMBER 1 



K-STATE POLICE 



Campus 

officer 

charged 



A K-Stttc Police officer was arrested 
Saturday night on four counts of taking 
aggravated indecent liberties with a child. 

Harry Woodruff was brought into the Riley 
County Police Department Saturday night for 
questioning and was subsequently arrested. He is 
confined in the Riley County Jail with bond set 
at $7,500. He will be arraigned at I p.m. today. 

Woodruff has worked for the campus police 
for two years. He also worked for the RCPD in 
the 1970s. 

A source in the K State Police Department, 
who asked to remain anonymous, said the 
background check done before Woodruff was 
hired showed him unsuitable for employment, 
but that the check was ignored 

"He failed his background check," the source 
said. "The chief was advised of this and hired 
him anyway. 

"On background investigation, they found he 
worked for the RCPD in the '70s and left under 
suspicious circumstances," the source said. This 
was known by Chief Bcckom when he 
(Woodruff) was hired. 

"Beckom hired this guy, and complaints were 
made to the University, and the University did 
nothing about it." 

K Stare Police Chief Charles Beckorn denied 

■ See CHEF page 14 



2 arrested 
on campus 
in drug raid 




The president of Black Student Union and 
another man were arrested at Jardine Terrace 
Apartments Aug. 9 on counts of unlawful use of 
a telephone to arrange the sale of a controlled 
substance. 

John Kitchings, senior in psychology and 
BSU president, and Daryl Folse. 31, were among 
several people caught in a citywide drug raid, 
said Officer Darla Gee of the Riley County 
Police Department. 

Folse was also charged with possession of 
cocaine with intent to sell and conspiracy to sell 



Kitchings was released on $4,000 bond and 
will be arraigned in court today. Folse was 
released on $ 10.000 bond 

Kitchings said he is innocent 

"I was charged with talking on the telephone 
about the possession, manufacture or distribution 
of drugs," Kitchings said. 

"It was very unspecific," he said. "I was not 

■ See KiTCHMOS page 14 



A 

'92. 



J. KVU WVATT Co*i»*n 

group (ABOVE) watches rock cover band Mere Mortals Friday evening at Aggtefest 
Walker, freshman undecided, (RIGHT) gets hia kicks otherwise during the show. 



Last Aqqieville 



blast before class 



"Everything 
was under 
control, no 
big disturb- 
ances. We 
had, of 
course, a * 
lot off 
alcohol 
violations, 
but that's 



new for this 

time of 



RCPD OFFICER 
DARLA GEE 



CoJk|un 

Jason Wright risked skin cancer 
for a good cause Friday afternoon 
and learned a few things in the 
process. 

"I'm burnt to a crisp," said 
Wright, program director for 
KMKF-FM 101.5. otherwise 
known as K-Rock. 

K Rock and TCI Cable of 
Manhattan were the main sponsors 
of Aggiefcst '92, a day-long music 
fest that featured live performances 
from Elmo & the Deadbeats, Mere 
Mortals, Nash Vegas Cowhands, 
Salty Iguanas and the head liners, 
the Romantics. The band XYZ was 
also scheduled to play, Wright said, 
but the band's bus broke down. 

The event took place in the 
parking lot at the comer of 12th and 
Laramie streets, providing plenty of 
room for milling about, as well as 
easy access to the beer gardens of 
Last Chance Restaurant & Saloon 
and Kites's Bar A Grille. 

Proceeds from the event went to 



the Michael Meyer Bone Marrow 
Transplant Fund and the Rint Hills 
Breadbasket. 

A city ordinance prohibited 
Aggie fest patrons from carrying 
alcohol into the cordoned-off 
parking lot where the bands played, 
a circumstance that was blamed for 
a sparse crowd early in the 
afternoon. Most people spent their 
time drinking legally in the beer 
gardens, usually only several feet 
from the music area. 

"Personally, I disagree with the 
city ordinance, but it is an 
ordinance, and we abide by that," 
said Wright, adding that he thought 
many of the city's and University's 
policies regarding alcohol lack 
consistency. 

"I wish there were fewer double 
standards," Wright said. 

It could be argued the absence of 
alcohol was a reason for the 
relatively trouble-free atmosphere 
that reigned at Aggiefest '92. 

■ See FESTIVAL page 6 




NEWS DIGEST 


► RAIN DOUSES 


► BAKER MOVES 


WILDFIRES 


TO NEW POST 


SOMEWHAT 


WASHINGTON (AP) — 




Jama* Baker bowed out 


(AP) Overnight rain and 


quietly Sunday after three 


some snow dampened fire- 


and a half years as secretary 


ravaged Idaho Sunday, and 


of stale. Lawrence Eagle- 


trash firefighters buoyed 


burger, acting secretary of 


those working on 15 wildfire* 


state, takes over today, 


that have burned across 


bringing 35 years of foretgn- 


nearly 30,000 acres of range 


pokcy experience to the job. 


and forest 


Baker now takes up his 


In Northern California, 


duties as White House chief 


residents began assessing 


of staff. 


property damage from a 
63 ,000-acre fire in Shasta 


► NO-FLY ZONE 


County twt raged for a 
fourth day. 


LIKELY IN IRAQ 


Idaho's largest blaze, the 


SPRINGFIELD, HI. (AP) 


235.250 acre FoothMs fire, 


— President Bush is dose to 


grew 3,250 acres overnight. 


announcing that the United 


but Boise National Forest 


State* will impose a no-fty 


spokesman Ken Cab* said 


zone over southern Iraq, 


fire managers ware 


warning that Saddam 


unruffled 


Husseins warpianes will be 


Fire crews hope to 


shot down if they attempt to 


complete firs line* around 


attack Shirt* Muslims, the 


th* Maze by Sept 0. 


White House said Sunday. 



HURRICANE ANDREW 



Florida braces for deadly storm 



MIAMI — Hurricane Andrew surged 
relentlessly toward southern Florida on 
Sunday, and forecasters warned it 
would be the most powerful storm to hit 
the United States in decades. More than 
I million residents were told to flee. 

The hurricane ripped into the 
Bahamas Sunday afternoon with 120 
mph winds, heavy rain and surging 
tides. The outlying eastern islands of 



Abaco and Eleuthera were hit first. Four 
deaths have been reported 

"It's on a dead course for South 
Florida. I hoped I would never 
experience this," said Bob Sheets, 
director of the National Hurricane 
Center in suburban Coral Gables. 
"We've not seen anything like this in 
the past few decades." 

Gov. Lawton Chiles issued a state of 
emergency and activated National 
Guard forces as Andrew grew to a 



Category 4 storm, the same as 
Hurricane Hugo in 1989, with winds of 
1 50 mph. 

Forecasters expected it to reach 
Category 5 — the worst category, with 
winds topping 1 55 mph — as it crossed 
the Gulf Stream to Florida. 

"I'm prepared for the worst," said 
Jim McDcrmott, 65, of Marathon, who 
spent Sunday evening at a Red Cross s 

■ See FLORIDA page 14 




HURRICANE 
ANDREW OFF 
FLORIDA'S 
COAST 



BRAMLAOE 



Good luck, Brooks fans: Lottery for tickets 



awwwwuci 

f*it*niin 

K-State students will have 
one last chance to get tickets 
for the Sept. 12 Garth Brooks 
show at Bmmtage Coliseum. 

However, they'd better tie 
rabbits' feet on their cowboy 
hats and put lucky coins in their 



boots 

There will he a special 
lottery Monday, Aug. 31, at 
Bramlage io allocate at least 
2,500 tickets thai have been 
specifically reserved by 
Brooks* management for K- 
State students. 

Although thai probably 



won't be enough to meet 
demand. Bramlage Director 
Charlie Thomas said even 
getting the 2,500 tickets was a 
surprise, 

"This is not a normal 
occurrence," he said. "We 
requested that they hold an 

■ See TICKETS page 14 



BROOKS LOTTERY RULES 

1. You must be a K State student and 

hevs your ws receipt. 
a. Students who hive tickets from the 

general mal order are not stowed to 



». Payment must be by cash, 
personal check or money order. 

4. There is a purchase Smrt of two 
ttofcets per student. 




2 August 24, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FOLLOW UP 



Improvements 
for mainframe 



Collcjian 

After eight months of study, 
planning and research, the future of 
the K-State mainframe will be dealt 
with on a local level. 

With the decision made, 
improvements will be made to the 
existing mainframe beginning in 
two years as part of a five-year 
plan. 

Originally, members of the 
Computer Information Technology 
Advisory Committee and its three 
sub-committees, combined with 
Provost James Coffman and Vice 
Provost Bob Kruh, examined a 
possible merger with the University 
of Kansas or using the storage and 
memory capacities of the IBM 
mainframe based in Boulder, Colo. 

Late last spring, committee 
members met with IBM 
representatives to hear 

presentations on using a 
supplementary mainframe, or 
outsourcing. If K State had chosen 
to use IBM's services, the disk- 
storage devices would have been 
kept in Dallas, 

During that same week last 
spring, KU representatives met with 
K- State administrators to discuss 
possible consolidation. At that time. 
Richard Mann, chief administrator 
of computer facilities at KU, was 
submitting a draft of a partnership 
agreement. 

Although the process of 
weighing the pros and cons of each 
option had taken more than eight 
months, the issue of transferring 
academic, enrollment and financial 
aid records didn't come up until 
Coffman and Kruh proposed it in a 
Computing and Network Services 
staff meeting in February. 

When the issue of a possible 
merger was raised, Stephen Welch, 
interim director of computing and 



network services, said the first 
option to be considered by CITAC 
committee members was to set up 
future guidelines. 

"We wanted to look at the 
desired outcome matched up with 
the overall picture." he said, "We 
realized we wanted to look ahead 
and position ourselves five years 
later to see if we would be on target 
with where technology is going to 
put us." 

In addition to a group of officials 
working on a decision, Welch said 
administrators met with college 
deans. Faculty Senate, students and 
CNS staff to hear their concerns. 

Even though the decision has 
been made, Welch said changes 
will begin within the next two 
years. 

"Within the next two years we'll 
be making a set of discrete 
improvements," he said. "The three 
years following, new dollars will 
come into the program along with 
the reallocation of present dollars to 
make significant progress and 
dramatically improve the 
networks." 

Welch said the most important 
aspect is the network that ties the 
system together. 

An number of improvements 
will result from the decision. Public 
labs will be upgraded, and facilities 
will be improved for students who 
rely on high-performance 
computing, Welch said. This is 
used for intensive »c>entific 
calculations, which regime 
computers to complete 100 million 
or billion operations per second. 
The mainframe now generates 
about 28 million operations per 
second. 

Also, electronic classrooms, 
which use a link system that 
includes instructional video, will be 
improved. 



! P OLICE R EPORTS 

f - - - ■ — ■ — — -- — — J 



K-STATC POLICE 



These reports are taken directly from the daily tog of the KSU Police 
Department, Because of incomplete information in the log, not all campus 
crimes arc listed here. 
SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 



At 10:55 p.m., a raport was taksn 
In Lot A-i 2 for thrss suspscls In 
possession of bssr. 

RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the Riley County 
Police Department. Because of space constraints, not all crimes appearing 
in the log are published. 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 






POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 



T>» una Sun Colaenn (USPS »i 0201 ■ Dudwi wMwaKmui San Urn***,, a 
Subtohad &j SkxMnt Putttaww tnc Kaot.a Haa 103, !■ fin Km MMt Pm CoMgbfl * 

lui) Mil »imlif»j i itiiiirgtr, irnn1|ir i-itmri ■ ith*- ir"tm*"*T 1 Saoonddaaa 

ocstaga * pad * Mvhaan. Kan . MS02 

POSTMASTER Sand imnii cnaryai to Kansas SUM Cuwgari Pi i iM n ■ (Mat, Kaon* 103 
Manninan. Kan . MSOS-71C7 

Naan c***u*xi*»<« tw accaeM by Mspnont. (913) S32-SSSS. a at »w Congo* n— wo rn. 
IfMi If I II 

InqMnt eonefwng tacst nwonat am) aamUd <*t&mi a a na mm g tftouMOa anna la flisi 
S3J-6S5S 



At 1 :13 s-m., Halls** L. Schmidt, 
1221 Raton*, rsportsd a pur** stolen 
from her car and damag* to ihs 
drtvtr's ski* window. Loss was $1 50. 

At 1:40 a.m., a Shop Oulk 
employ** at 1016 Claflln reported that 
someone let! without paying for gas. 
Loss was •sttmalsd at flO.10. 

At 242 a.m., two empty beer kegs 
w*r* reported stolen from th* front 
porch at 1050 Claflln, No. 9. Loss was 
$100. 

At 216 am.. Frank L. Fulton. 2525 
Ebock St. Owsnsboro, Ky., was 
arrested In Marysvlit* on a warrant tor 
failure lo appear for a 0UI He waa 
confined in lieu of $1,000 bond. 

At 2:45 a.m., Qtnny L. 
Sttchternath, 2125 Buckingham, Ho. 
12, was arrested lor a QUI in th* 1 100 
block of Bluemont. Sh* was rali aa ad 
on a $500 bond. 

At. 3:22 a.m., Erie Deeds, S17 
Kearney, No. 6, reported a man's 21- 
speed bike taken from 1031 Uoro, No. 
4. Loss was $404. 

At 7:5« a.m.. Karl Norris, 4460 
Turtle Crsak Blvd.. No. 67. reported * 
major damage, non-Injury accident 
wttri a utility pot*. 

At 10:06 a.m., Virgil Cobb, 114 
Redbud Estates, reported minor 
lo his car after a hit-and-run 



At 10:55 am., Karen Str**t*r, 2412 
Marlon, reported two speakers and an 
AM /FM cassette receiver stolen from 
her ear wtvll* It was parked in th* 
1100 block of tJkxo. Loss wss $300. 

At 11:19 a.m., Jamas McAllister, 
1023 Yuma, No. 2, reported damage to 
Ms car window. Loss was $200. 

At 12:10 p.m., Nancy Miller, 1619 
Todd, reported a mountain bike 
stolen. Los* was $200. 

At 12:30 p.m., David Bruchfield. 
3000 Tuttie Creek Blvd., No. 34, 
reported a woman's mountain bike 
taken from his residence. Loss was 
$100. 

At 1 :44 p.m., Jon S. Morrison, 31 36 
Lundln, No. 6, suftsred a neck injury, 
but refused tr**tm*nl by Alley County 
Ambulance attar h« was Involved in s 
vehicle accident In the 400 block of 
Bluemont. Ward A. Stockamp, 1725 
Feirchild Ave and Dennis E. Arnold, 
1030 Gardenway, Apt. A, wars also 
Involved In th* Incident, 



CAMPUS BULLETIN 

Monday, August 24 wmmmmmmmmmammmm*^ 

■K State Rowing Association will meet at 6 p.m. at 2302 
Timbercreek for returning/varsity rowers. 

■UFM class registration will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Table 1 
in the Union. 

■The Union will sponsor a Service Fair from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in 
the Union Courtyard to answer questions about cable TV, 
telephone, local bank accounts, newspaper services and more. 

■The Union will sponsor "College Fund-amentals" from 4 to 5 
p.m. in Derby 134 for students financing their own education. 

■The Union will sponsor "Choosing a Major* from 6 to 7 p.m. in 
Derby 134 for students undecided. Campus resources will be 
discussed. 

■"Just Guys" will meet at 7:05 p.m. in Union 207 to discuss 
men's issues and interpersonal relationships. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 25 



■Union Service Fair will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Union 
Courtyard. 

■"Preparing for the Law School Admission Test* will be at 1 30 
p.m. in Union 204. This is essential for 1992-93 test -takers. 

■"Law School Deadlines and Application Information* will be 
from 3 to 5 p.m. in Union 205. 

■Freshmen and new students in the College of Education will 
meet at 7 p.m. in Burt 101. 

■"Using Library Resources" demonstrations will be from 1 1 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. on the K- State Union Main Floor by the Wildcat Card 
window. 

■"There's More to K-State Than Books* will be from 4 to 5 p.m. 
in Derby 134. The presentation will explain student activities and 
organizations. 

■"Building Bridges' will meet from 6 lo 7 p.m. in Derby 134 to 
discuss the importance of culture and diversity. 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 HMMMsaMMBBM 

■Computing and Network Services will sponsor a free lecture on 

using the CMS operating system on the University mainframe from 

2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Cardwell 102. 

■"Law School Deadlines and Application Information* will be 

from 9:30 to 1 1 :45 a.m. in Union 204. 



WEATHER 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 



TODAY'S FORECAST 

Today, partly cloudy. A 30-percent chance for showers and 
thunderstorms. Highs 85 to 90 




TOMORROW'S FORECAST 

Cooler A 50-percent chance of showers and 
thunderstorms. High around 80. 




GOODLAND 

82/62 



GAHDEN CITY 

a) 88/63 

LIBERAL 
I N A 



MANHATTAN 

88660 



TOPEKA 

.88/62 



RUSSELL 

93/68 



WICHITA 

* 91/66 



aaBSSSM 




COFFEYVILLE 

A 87/66 



EXTENDED FORECAST 



WORLD TEMPERATURES 



a 



A chance of rain and thunderstorms Wednesday and 
Thursday. Cool each day with highs in the 70s to tower 80s 
Lows from the mirj-50s to the mid-6Qs Thursday and Friday 



IhrVsali 



91/77 



clear 



Amsterdam 
Beirut 



70/55 



clear Jerusalem 



81/63 



ciear 



Calgary 



84/72 cloudy . Singap ore 



90/75 



rain 



43/32 



clear Vienna 



90773 




Union National Bank 

is pleased to announce 
our proposed merger with 

ask 

Commerce 
Banc shares, Inc. 

Missouri based, regional bank holding company 



Except for the Commerce name on 
the bank, you will hardly notice the 
change. You will still be served by the 
same people, in the same place, with 
the same attention to safety and 
quality service. Only now, we will 
have the resources and experience of 
Commerce bank to make these 
qualities even stronger. 

In today* s highly competitive, technol- 
ogy intense, and regulation burdened 
environment, joining Commerce will 
allow Union National Bank to 
maintain the position of leadership in 
the financial community it has 
enjoyed for over 40 years. 



Union National Bank was sought by 
many who wanted to be a part of 
Manhattan, so we have been very 
particular and very cautious in 
choosing a partner. Without question, 
Commerce is the best in every respect 
for our community, our customers, 
and our employees. 

Commerce, like Union National Bank, 
has consistently demonstrated its 
commitment to sound banking 
practices and financial strength. At 
the same time, both have contributed 
to the growth and vitality of the 
communities they serve. Call us 
today. Let us serve you. 



Skaters Dr. at 400 Tuttie Creek Btvd. 
■■»* Manhattan, KS 68602 — 
Ph. 913/776-6175 



aza 



9% 



»> ea pa Saf s jB si i ^vNgWfi. ta»w>fcs- Caw rV t v srV a. { 



y r V.VVV.VVVVVV.VVWV^VVV>VV*VVVVVVVVVVJ 



I. 



>L-0-N-&'H'O-R-N-S-- -£■ 



*>*».-.».' 



FREE DANCE LESSONS! 

TONIGHT! 

Every Monday and Tuesday 
All Semester. 7:30 - 9:00 pm. 

$1 Tequila Shots 

1115 Moro 776-87 70 




I 

! 

: 

I 



222. 



HEALTH INSURANCE 
RENTER'S INSURANCE 

•Major Medical or Hospital Plans Available 
•Non-Smoker Discounts 
•With or Without Maternity 

INSURECO 537-4414 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 24, 1902 O 



EDUCATION 



English GTAs' 

relocation seen 
as inconvenient 



KAMWMUTT 



Collctiai 

The English graduate teaching 
assistants have moved their desks 
from Denison Hall to Nichols Hall 
basement, which some GTAs say 
will be an inconvenience for them 
as well as students. 

Sarah Cunningham, president of 
the Student Association for 
Graduates in English, said she feels 
being in the same room will be 
confusing, tense and crowded. 

"With all of us in one area and 
no separation between about 50 
desks, I can see us getting very 
tense," Cunningham said. "Once 
they find where we are at, they will 
have to wait in this small hallway 
while other students are walking in 
and out 



constantly. 
We figured 
most of the 
students will 
be lucky if 
they can 
find us over 
there." 

It will 
also be 

inconvenient 
to be located 
away from 
Eisenhower 
and Denison 
halts. 
Cunningham 
said. Before, 
it was 



convenient 
to make copies and do other things 
with the office nghl down the hall. 
Now, we will have to be organized 
and plan more. 



going to be 
moved again 
next year. 
This is the 
worst part 
of the 
situation, 
and it is 
becoming 
annoying." 

SARAH 
CUNNINGHAM 



"Once we gel settled in. we are 
going to be moved again next 
year," Cunningham said. "This is 
the worse part of the situation, and 
it is becoming annoying." 

However, being in the same 
room will be helpful for the new 
GTAs, Cunningham said. Nichols 
has windows and phones which is a 
look on the brighter side. 

"This should work better 
because there is more room," said 
Dean Hall, English department 
head. "The teachers will have their 
own desks. Also, they will be 
located in the same room which 
will be more convenient for the 
students to find." 

The former GTA offices were 
replaced with a new computerized 
writing lab and a small conference 
room. These rooms have been 
carpeted and remodeled for a 
homelike look. 

"These will mainly be used by 
freshmen," Hall said. "The lab. 
which cost about $80,000. was 
purchased through a grant the 
department received in December." 

The tab will be used by students 
on a walk-in basis to type their 
papers. Assistants will be available 
to help them with any questions or 
problems they might have. 

The small conference room will 
be used for talking with students 
individually at a table. 

"The idea of a conference room 
was to provide the students with 
something besides a classroom 
atmosphere." Hall said. "The 
teachers can arrange the tables to 
talk to several students or just one 
at their convenience." 





■' 



/ 






/ 







— 




Afternoon Stroll 

Renee Pern/, graduate ttudent in geology, villa I 
p«t a napping man near Cardwdl Hall Friday night. 



CAHY COMOnmCotagun 



her brother. Nate, freshman In education, tod sister, Angle, senior in (oumeMam and mass comm u ni ca tions; 



SQA 



SGA to face 
many of the 
same issues 



SHAWN eaucs 



CMaJaa 

New year, many of the same 
issues. 

Student Government Association 
is hoping many of them can be 
resolved through new people, and 
hopefully, new ideas. 



"There's been a special effort to 
bring in new people," said Student 
Senate Chairman Ian Bautista. 
"When you have the same people 
and same issues, you stagnate." 

Those new faces will first have 
to tackle Senate's leftover business. 
One of the biggest issues is how to 



respond to a Black Student Union 
memorandum addressing such 
issues as a multicultural curriculum 
and minority faculty hiring. 

"We've shown moral support for 
all of the issues that BSU has 
brought up and will continue to do 
so," said Student Body President 



Jackie McClaskey 

McClaskey is also serving on a 
Board of Regents committee to 
tackle many of the same issues with 
which BSU is concerned, .she said 
she is hopeful it will improve the 
multicultural climate, not only at K- 
State. but systemwide. 



Bautista said there's a limit in 
how much Student Senate can do to 
meet BSU 's demands. 

"Our hands are really tied." he 
said. "We're already on record 
supporting the same basic kinds of 

■ Sec SGA page 14 




^,c VlESTERtf ^ 

^«C\»* > 913-776-6715 * <lj& p^ 




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Manhattan, Kansas 66502 

MENS LEE JEANS 

•Straight Leg and Boot Cut 

NOW ONLY $10/pair 
•Western Slacks $5 
•Western Suits $20 

Straw Hats I Short Sleeve Shirts 

1/2 Price 1/2 Price 

SALE ENDS SEPTEMBER 4TH- 




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304 Poyntz 
Downtown 



OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT SPGCUUSTS 
Mon - Fri 9-6 
Thura 9-8 
Sat. 9-5 



Phono 

539-5639 




PINION 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



The opinions expressed in "In Our Opinion" are ihe opNoo* of a majority of EdNofW 
Board members. Theee iim do not rieosasarsy represent the views ol Kansas SIMM 
Unrversily, Student PubHcatom mc. « the A Q Mttar Schod oi Journalism and Man 

Commuracations 



Sam an the Branson 
Jared Savage 



Enrt ftrry 
AmyCoi 
Stwwn Rnjc* 
Rank Kleamann 



Rk-tardAndiadc 
ioJelt Lanier 
D»» id Maya 
Cticfc Thome 

1MJ 



Cotumrw are Vm oqtoioni ot 

on*r rn# colufflniit They do not 
f ened the *««e of ait Kama* 
Staat OXagart, po> iuiaad after a 



AUGUST 24, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



In Our Opinion 



By the Collegian Editorial Board 



I w.-t.-Jja*" 



Hussein still pain for Bush 



THE ISSUE 

Recent 

events Ml IrsQ 
hava put 
President Bush 
in the hot seat 
during this 
election year. 



WE SUGGEST 

Bush should 
either take 



action or leave 
the issue alone 
until after the 
ele c ti o n. 



He won't say he will, he won't say he 
won't. 

That's the stance President Bush took a 
week ago following a New York Times 
report that the United States was planning 
on picking a fight with pesky Iraq in order 
to finish business that should have been 
completed months ago. 

Riding semi-high on the crest of the 
GOP convention, Bush now faces the task 
of righting some embarrassing wrongs, 
Iraq being one of them. 

The antics of Iraqi President Saddam 
Hussein in recent months have made Bush 
look like a helpless babysitter burdened 
with an uncontrollable child. 

For the second time in little over a 
decade, a Muslim leader has had direct 
influence on an American election. We all 
remember the Iranian hostage crisis 
possibly costing Jimmy Carter a second 
term in 1980. 



Now, after repeatedly bullying United 
Nations' weapons-inspection teams and 
brazenly squeezing concessions from the 
U.N. coalition that drubbed them in their 
own backyard, Iraq has been doing more 
damage to Bush's re-election bid than 
could the sleaziest of sleaze campaigns. 

Poor George, he can't win. 

Only a few days ago Bush's new 
campaign manager, James Baker III, 
announced a fresh concentration on long- 
ignored domestic issues. A crisis with 
Hussein now could tear that to shreds, 
giving the Democrats more ammunition at 
a time when they hAe more than they 
know what to do with. 

On the other hand. Bush can't afford to 
let Hussein continue to walk all over him. 
After all, Hussein is well aware that this is 
an election year (He gets HBO and CNN, 
remember?) and you can bet he'll milk 
Bush's dilemma for all that it's worth. 



Three cheers for Charlie Thomas 



THE ISSUE 

Charlie 
Thomas and 
the staff at 

deserve 
recognition for 

their recent 



billings. 



Bramlage Coliseum Director Charlie 
Thomas doesn't look like a man who 
would be successful in the entertainment 
business. 

His rumpled sports coat, cheerful nature 
and slightly protruding stomach remind 
you of your best friend's dad instead of a 
man responsible for the entertainment of 
20,000 students, along with the whole of 
the surrounding area. 

But appearances certainly don't tell the 
whole story. 

In the past four years alone, Thomas has 
managed to bring bands like Van Halen, 
Chicago, and Def Leppard to K-State. 
Even the hottest act in music today. Garth 
Brooks, will be making a Little Apple stop 
Sept. 12. 

And it's not just music. Bramlage, under 
Thomas, has or will offer in the future, 



circuses, dancing horses and the ever- 
popular professional wrestling. It's all part 
of a philosophy of giving people a little bit 
of everything. 

He's not perfect, as recently exhibited by 
mixed-up communication to potential 
ticket buyers over the Brooks' concert. 
Ticket buyers were first told they would 
have to wait in line, then told over summer 
break that they would have to mail in ticket 
requests for a ticket lottery. 

However, it is nice to see that Thomas 
has supported the idea of having a set 
number of tickets reserved for a student- 
only lottery. It's nice to see someone 
remember those who pay his salary. 

Thanks, Charlie. Now could you get on 
the phone and see if you can get U2 or 
Guns and Roses? 



Readers Write 

mmamBmmammmammmmammkwmrmi 

► FROM THB OPINION PAGE EDITOR 

Your letters are 
needed and desired 



It all started last week when 1 
crawled out of bed one 
morning, or afternoon, and 
realized that in a few short days 
[ would be the next Collegian 
Opinion Page editor. 

Me. an editor. What a laugh. 
I can barely spell my own last 
name right half the time, and 
here I am making a stab at an 
editor's job. I've had professors 
curse my writing as dull and 
esoteric, people I don't even 
know tell me that I'm full of. 
well, you know what, and 
mental gremlins telling me that I 
shouldn't quit my day Job. 

But sometimes, and for me 
most of the time, common sense 
is overshadowed by a curious 
little desire to do something 
different. As a further example, I 
give you bungee jumping. Or 
watching the Home Shopping 
Network. Not that I've done 
these things, mind you, but 
being a Collegian editor has to 
rank up there somewhere. 

So 1 figure for the next 
semester I'll be a walking target. 
A repository for a gajillton 
views and ideas, problems and 
solutions. I can only hope that 
my shrink has plenty of open 
time on his schedule. Heaven 
knows 1*11 probably make more 
than one visit. 

By the same token though, I 
also hope that all of you will 
lake the opportunity to send me 
your views. Even if it's tied to a 
brick and tossed through my 
window. Or carved into my car's 
paint job. 

If you have a view, however. 
the most effective way of getting 
someone to read it is to limit it 
to about 1 50 words, be bnef and 
to (he point. Then drop it by 
Kedzic 106. Make sure to bring 
your student ID. Of course, we 
reserve the right to edit it for 




length and clarity. 

Anyway, this is your opinion 
page, and I will make every 
effort possible to see that your 
hate marl makes it in. That's why 
we've decided to devote more 
space to your letters. Where this 
column is is 
where they 
will appear. 

A couple 
of other 
things — if 
you don't 
tike 
something 
you read, let 
us know. 
The entire 
staff has 
had JARED 

counseling CaVAPF 
to cure us J/WrYVjt 

our sjSRMBMHHBH 
godhead 

syndromes, and we're just 
regular students tike yourselves, 
trying to make a buck and get a 
little experience. 

Those of you who have been 
around awhile know how creepy 
my photographs tend to be. 
Well, this is one of the few times 
that you'll have to endure it. I 
see it as my civic duty to finally 
relieve the campus of having to 
gaze on my mug. Plus, you now 
know what I look like, so feel 
free to assault me on campus if 
you so feel the need. And I 
won't print any letters remarking 
about my mug, so save your 
energy thank you very much. 

So onward and upward. It "s a 
ripe season this semester, with 
the election and all, so there'll 
be plenty to keep an eye on. 
Undoubtedly, we'll say some 
good things and not so good 
things. But with a little luck and 
a lot of caffeine, it'll be one 
semester for the books. 



TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR POLICY 

We wouW like to hear 
what you trunk Send your 
comments, criticisms and 
complaints to us 

Please include a phone 
number so we can get in 
touch with you in case there 
are questions concerning your 
letter 

Before letters are printed 
in the Collegian, we need to 
see a picture 10. Letters 
submitted may be edited tor 
grammar and length 

We cannot guarantee that 
your letter will run, but we will 
try to make sure a sampling ol 
both sides of an issue gel into 
the Collegian 



K*3 


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BY KEDZIC 1 16 OB SEND 
THEM TO: 

Letters to the Editor 
c/o Jared Savage 
Kansas State Collegian 
KedzieHall 106 
Manhattan. KS 66506 




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HOUSTON — In an ironic 
switch on the controversy that 
dogged Dan Quayle four years ago. 
Pres ,, -ni Bush's campaign 
strategists are trying to make an 
issue of Bill Clinton's Vietnam -era 
draft record. 

It's going to take adroit handling 
to take advantage now of a topic 
that nagged their own vice 
presidential nominee last time. But 
the Bush people think they can use 
it to boost the Republican ticket 
among men middle-aged and up, 
particularly the middle-class and 
blue-collar voters they're trying to 
reclaim. To that generation, military 
service equaled patriotism, a legacy 
of World War II. 

Clinton and Quayle both avoided 
the Vietnam drafl, the vice 
president by enlisting in the Indiana 
National Guard, the Democratic 
presidential nominee through a 
student and ROTC deferment and, 
later, the luck of a high draft-lottery 
draw. 

But Quayle says "there's a big 
difference" because he chose to 
serve by joining the National 
Guard, and Clinton chose not to 
serve it all. Clinton says he 



relinquished a deferment and 
voluntarily put his name into the 
draft pool in 1969. but drew a high 



WALTER Vice President and 
■m jr _, columnist forme 

MEARS Aaocuccd Preu 



number and was not called. 

The draft question became one 
of Clinton's campaign headaches 
back in New Hampshire; he dealt 
with it in detail then, and when it 
comes up now, he says he did 
nothing wrong. 

"All I've been asked about by 
the press is a woman I didn't sleep 
with and a draft I didn't dodge." he 
lamented of those so-called 
character issues during the New 
Hampshire presidential primary 
campaign. 

Now the Bush campaign is out to 
revive the second of those topics, 
the draft, in the fall campaign. 

There was no subtlety from 
conservative Patrick Buchanan. 
"When Bill Clinton's turn came in 
Vietnam, he sat up in a dormitory in 



Oxford, England, and figured out 
how to dodge the draft," Buchanan 
said. 

"We'll be talking about the 
values of George Bush vs. those of 
Bill Clinton, talking about a man 
who quit school to go fsght for his 
country and one who went to school 
to avoid Hghling for it," said Sen. 
Alan Simpson of Wyoming. Bush 
flew combat missions in the Pacific 
in World War II as the youngest 
pilot in the Navy. 

Questions like that were a 
problem for Quayle almost from the 
day he was chosen for the Bush 
ticket. He enlisted in the Indiana 
National Guard in 1969 after his 
college deferment ended. There 
were suggestions, which he denied, 
that family influence helped him get 
the Guard slot that kept him out of 
the draft. He said his unit could 
have been activated any lime during 
the six years he served. 



In Houston, Quayle said there's 
no comparison between Clinton's 
record and his. "I wore the uniform 
for six years," he said in an NBC- 
TV interview. "I chose to serve my 
country. Bill Clinton chose not to." 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 
THIATCR -MHMMMMM 



August 24, 1992 C 



Auditions offer students role in K-State productions 



Cottetan 

With a new semester of new 
classes full of new faces and new 
work, the thought of something else 
new may just send you running for 
a brand-spanking-new strailjacket. 

But, hey, new is good, and here's 
your chance as K-State theater 
productions fall auditions begin 
today. 

Encompassing four shows, the 
try outs are open in the most literal 
sense of the word. Any full- or part- 
time student can show up and try 
his or her hand at the thespian arts. 

"We basicalty need students 
from all different levels of abilities, 
so they really don't need to be shy," 
said Marct Maullar, assistant 
professor of theater and general 
manager of theater productions. 

"Directors look not only at your 
abilities, but also at whether or not 
you fit the pan in the production," 
Maullar said. "And even then, they 
will sometimes take a chance and 
cry to bring a new dimension to the 
character." 

The shows include three K-State 
Theatre Group productions: the 
popular musical comedy "The Best 



Little Whorehouse in Texas," "Our 
Country's Good" and the student- 
directed "The Ladies of Sharp 
End." 

Ebony Theatre Co, also will 
have auditions for "The First 
Breeze of Summer." 

In the audition process, the 
students choose which production 
they want to try out for, then give a 
reading from the script. Those who 
choose a musical will be evaluated 



on singing and stage movement. 

After the first round of auditions, 
the directors select those they wish 
to call back, after which they meet 
with other directors to see who 
wants whom for which productions. 

Usually, one person will not be 
involved in more than one 
production at a time: however, it is 
possible if the individual has small 
roles. 

Practices are from 7 lo 10 p.m. 



Monday through Friday for seven to 
eight weeks, and then for the run of 
the show, from two days to two 
weeks. 

"It's a very real commitment," 
Maullar said. 

"Often, it is something that 
theater majors can do but that non- 
majors really have to consider," she 
said. "They can, however, receive 
one hour of credit for participation." 
Also needed arc musicians for 



AUDITION INFORMATION 

WHEN 



Auditions for three 
K-State Theatre 
productions and one 
Ebony Theatre Co. 



7 p.m. today, Tuesday and 
Wednesday 
WHERE: Lobby of Nichols Hall 

Interested musicians call Bill WingfieW at 532-5740 



"The Best Little Whorehouse in 
Texas." 

"Any KSU student can try out, 
and we will need a lot of non -major 



students for the musical." Maullar 
said, "We are really interested in 
multicultural casting and are really 
trying to get the word out." 





Union National Bank & Trust offers the "Command Account," a checking account with an 
ATM Command Card to give you access to your money 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, 

• Includes 7 checks per month with no charge! 

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SEPT 1 & 2 



4 ATM LOCATIONS. 



• The KSU Student Union • West Bank at Westloop Shopping Center 
• Main Bank at 727 Poyntz • Manhattan Town Center Mall 



Please contact t'A.A for more inhwiuitiiin jftwuf tht Cummand \ccaunt and any too that pirtam to the account 




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mis Vi**— 



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g August 24, 1092 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



LIVE MUSIC 



Small crowd only disappointment at concert 



■YTf COiLaKMAH tTAFF 

There was only one 
disappointing aspect of Friday 
afternoon's Aggiefest '92. 

The concert was from noon to 8 
p.m. in the parking lot at 1 2th and 
Laramie streets, it was a beautiful 
day, the five bands all played 
powerful sets, it only cost $3 to get 
in and free T-shirts were given out. 

Unfortunately, for the first three 
hands, it seemed like only about 20 
people were there. 

Elmo and the Deadbeats opened 
the show. One of the highlights of 
their set was a cover of the 
Fabulous Thunderbirds' mid-'SOs 
hit "Wrap it Up." 

After Elmo and the Deadbeats 
came Mere Mortals, who played 
adequately for about half an hour, 
followed by the Nash Vegas 
Cowhands. 

The Cowhands boast a sound 
"deep from the heart of Dixie," 
according to the lead singer. The 
Cowhands delivered just that with 



songs like "An American Boy" and 
"Walking 'in Circles." 

The hand, which comes from 
Phoenix, was playing a gig in Hays 
when it received the offer to play at 
Aggiefest. 

The Salty Iguanas took the stage 
after the Cowhands. About 100 
people finally showed up for the 
band's mostly instrumental set. The 
Iguanas performed with more 
energy than the night before at the 
Wareham Opera House, and they 
also played without their customary 
psychedelic cooking-oil light show. 

The Romantics finally look the 
stage about 6:30 p.m. They played 
an energetic set. including "What 1 
Like About You," "Talking in Your 
Sleep" and "One in a Million." 

"It was awesome. When they 
started playing 'What 1 Like About 
You,' about 100 people were out 
there slam dancing. It was intense," 
said Jerrod Ron. junior in secondary 
education. 

The show ended with a two-song 
encore by the Romantics. About 
500 people had finally arrived by 
the end of the night. 




J. KYI! WVATT CoNegun 

Headlining Aggiefest 92. the Romantics pi ay their 80s hit "What I Like About You" lo en enthusiastic 
crowd of tans Aggiefest 92 started at noon and ended when the Romantics finished their set about 9 p.m. 



i Festival deemed 'qualified success' by K-Rock's Wright 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

"Everything was under control, 
no big disturbances," said Officer 
Jee of the Riley County Police 
Department. "We had, of course, a 

Program 
helps 
minority 
engineers 



Cofltjmm 

For the second consecutive year, 
the College of Engineering will be 
operating with an additional 
$30,000 in its budget. 

In June 1990, Andrew Cordero, 
Minority Engineering Program 
director, received a call about grant 
proposals from Atlantic Richfield 
Co. The grant would be offered to 
help install a program called "A 
Wise Investment in Student 
Excellence." The basts of WISE 
was to help expand the minority 
student program within the college. 
"Minority students are really at- 
risk students because the programs 
here are not originally designed to 
well match with students from a 
different ethnic background," 
Cordero said 

"Most minority students tend to 
come from closely knit 
backgrounds and communities. 
When they come to a campus of 
20,000 students without any family 
members, it puts up barriers that 
are hard to overcome. WISE tries 
to overcome this feeling of 
isolation." 

One of the program's 
components is grouping minority 
students together in common 
course sections like chemistry or 
college algebra. An orientation is 
also offered to help students leam 
important study skills, as well as to 
teach new students to adapt to a 
college student lifestyle. 

Workshops arc also held to 
encourage group effort on difficult 
classroom- related projects. 

Donald Rathbone, dean of the 
College of Engineering, said that 
WISE should not only help the 
college by means of retention, but 
also in terms of recruitment. 

"We're trying to get more 
minorities in engineering," he said 
"We need more minorities and 
women, but we don't quite have all 
of the role models because the 
college is mostly all white males. 
The numbers are getting larger, but 
not as large as we want them. Now 
we arc trying to compensate or 
adjust that." 

There were 25 students who 
participated in the WISE program 
last year. Cordero said there were 
roughly 13 students who were 
eligible to participate, but did not. 

Though the program's intent 
was to keep students interested and 
enrolled in the college, Cordero 
said that he could not measure the 
extent of success in that category 
until he saw the amount of 
participating students who returned 
to K -State for the semester. 

"You never actually know who 
is going to show until registration is 
finished and classes start," be said. 

Cordero said program's could be 
measured by comparing the grade 
point average of students 
participating in the WISE program 
to those who don't. Those 
participating had a grade point 
average nearly one grade point 
above those who didn't participate. 



lot of alcohol violations, but that's 
nothing new for this time of the 
year." 

James Volker's biggest calamity 
as a security personnel for the event 
came even before the shows started 



when he ejected two inebriated 
gentlemen from the stage area. 

"1 had to take out two winos," 
said Volker, senior in pre-dentisiry. 
"They weren't really hurting 
anyone, but they were a problem 



waiting to happen. I could see one 
of them tripping over a wire and 
hurting himself." 

Wright deemed Aggiefest '92 a 
qualified success. 

"We made money, and we do 



have money to donate to the 
causes." he said. "1 think people 
ended up having a good time. 

"This was definitely a learning 
experience." Wright said. "It'll be 
even bigger and better next year." 



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PORTS 



AP PRESEASON POLL 

Here are the top 20 footbaK IMnu aocortfnQ to the AaaocJstab Pr»t$ 
preseason football poll. Big Eight teams are boW. 



f. Miami 

t. Washington 
S. Notre Dame 
4. Florida 
». Florida St 



«. Michigan 
T. Texas MM 
«. Penn St. 
9. Alabama 
10, Syracuse 



11. NEBRASKA 

12. COLOflOAOO 
It, Clemson 

14, Georgia 
IB. OKLAHOMA 



IS. to*» 

17. Stanford 

18, UCLA 
1S. Ohio St 
20. California 



AUGUST 24, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



BASEBALL 



'An unbelievable experience' 




Co ItSj jn 



Craig Wilson relaxes in the dugout before an autograph session at Lawrence-Dumont Stadium. 

Wilson a summer Olympian 



STEVE ROCK 



"When 
people 

mentioned the 
U.5. baseball 
team, 
everybody 
immediately 
thought of the 
gold medal. 
What they 
don't realize is 
the dominance 
of the Cuban 
team," 

CRAIG WILSON 



CuUcfun 

After spending four years 
rewriting the K-State record books, 
former Wildcat baseball player 
Craig Wilson added a chapter to 
his storied book of feats this 
summer with a trip to the 
Olympic*. 

"That was just an unbelievable 
experience." Wilson said. "It was a 
spectacle for two weeks." ' 

Wilson, who holds K-State 
records in 1 1 offensive categories, 
including career RBI, runs scored 
and hits, said the trip to Barcelona, 
Spain, was something he will 
never forget. All this, he said, 
despite the fact that he was mired 
in what he called the wnrst slump 
of his career. 

In the Summer Games, Wilson 
managed two hits in just 10 st- 
oats. He was held without an RBI. 

During the summer. Team USA 
traveled the country in preparation 
for the Olympics. During that time. 
Wilson collected 19 hits in 83 at- 
bats. just a .229 clip, stroked a pair 
of home runs and was credited 
with 10 RBI. 

This came at the heels of a 
senior year in which he batted .4 1 6 
for the Cats and was named Big 
Eight Player of the Year. 

"I could never get in a rhythm," 
Wilson said, referring to the 
practice of rotating players every 
three games. "When you're in a 
slump, you just want to keep 
hitting. Going in spurts makes that 
a lot harder to do." 

And the pressure of being a 
member of the U.S. Olympic 
bascball team didn't help matters, 
he said. 

"It put s little pressure on all of 
us," Wilson said. "When people 



mentioned the U.S. baseball team, 
everybody immediately thought of 
the gold medal. What they don't 
realize is the dominance of the 
Cuban team." 

That Cuban team, which 
eventually claimed the gold, 
defeated Team USA in the first 
round of medal competition. 

That left (he Americans to play 
Japan in the bronze -medal game. 
Japan won 8-3, and Wihon 
finished his Olympic tour with a 
dismal .200 average. 

Wilson said he didn't do as well 
as hoped. 

But his summer-long slump 
wasn't the result of Olympic 
pressure, said Jerry Weinstcin. 
Team USA assistant coach and 
baseball coach at Sacramento City 
College. 

"It wasn't because he put extra 
pressure on himself," Weinstein 
said. "He controlled his emotions 
and is a real level person. He just 
never quite got on track 
offensively," 

Wilson, though, said he took 
both the loss and his hitting woes 
in stride. 

"It would have been nice to 
win," Wilson said, "but it was still 
a great experience." 

And that experience went 
beyond what took place on the 
diamond. 

Team USA spent much of the 
summer at major- league stadiums, 
where members received 
memorabilia, as well as advice, 
from big-leaguers. 

Wilson and the rest of the team 
stayed at the Olympic Village for 
the duration of the Games, where 
they crossed paths with such 
people as tennis gold medalist 
Jennifer Capriati, swimmer 




[ KSVSntCoMeQian 

Wilson receives some advice from Team USA's base coach during 
a practice before a June 24 exhibition game against Japan. 



Summer Sanders and volleyball 
great Steve Timmons. 

And after the Olympics, the 
team visited the White House to 
meet not only President Bush, but 
Arnold Schwarzenegger as well. 

"That was another unbelievable 
experience," Wilson said. "This 
whole summer was so exciting. 

It's hard to put into words." 

And with the Olympic 

experience still fresh in his 

memory, Wilson said, all he can 

do now is wait. 

Wilson was drafted in the 1 3th 



round of the major-league baseball 
draft by the Chicago White Sox. 
He is still unsigned, however, and 
is waiting to hear from the team. 

"I don't think they have 
immediate plans for me." Wilson 
said. "There's really no rush. I'm 
just waiting for that call to come 
in." 

Wilson, who is a Chicago 
native, said he is expecting to hear 
from the Sox within the next two 
weeks. 

"I'm ecstatic," he said. "I can't 
wait to gel started." 




Skoog 



HUNTIN' AND FISHIN' «BBJ 

Money, 
guns and 
attitude 



No one hums as grand as a Republican. Only 
a Republican has the money, guns, and 
attitude to follow the example of proto- 
Republican Theodore Roosevelt. 

The 1992 Republican platform quotes 
Roosevelt heavily on the subject of natural 
resources and various uses of public lands. They 
love the guy. 

Here's what the Republican Party's 1992 
platform says about guns: "Republicans defend 
the constitutional right to keep and bear arms..." 

And they mean it. Need guns to protect the 
country, and they're good 
for hunting, too. 

Not all Republicans 
hunt with guns. Some do 
the job with bow-and- 
arrow, some with fishing 
rods. 

Bowhunter/ motor city 
madman/ rock journalist 
Ted Nugent covered the 
Republican National 
Convention last week for 
MTV. He publishes a 
bowhunting magazine 
and runs a camp for 
hunting-deprived inner- 
city kids. 

And you can bet he 
votes Republican. 

President Bush, also present at the 
convention, takes long vacations with former 
Secretary of State James Baker to fish the high 
streams of Wyoming and the Atlantic coast. Fly* 
fishing is very G. O. P. Very Uncle Sam. 

No one can afford to hunt like a Republican. 
Large-caliber weapons, camp stoves, permits, 
and extended trips to the Yukon do not come 
cheap. And the best hunting lands are owned by 
Republicans, or by the government which is in 
turn owned by Republicans. 

The Democratic sportsperson goes down to 
the river, plunks in a lead weight with a worm. 
Or she heads out to her uncle's farm and hopes 
there's pheasant around, or quail. 

When a Democrat gets rich, she starts hunting 
in better places, buys a new gun, takes long trips 
and soon becomes a Republican. The way of the 
world. 

Upward mobility in hunting is rarely 
addressed. Elk, moose, and northern pike are 
reserved for the upper 2-percent tax bracket, 
while the peasants settle for pheasant. 

One of the great drives in America is the 
aspiration to slaughter large hoofstock. 

Gus Hall and the remainder of the Socialist 
Party favor mergansers. Only those who demand 
public ownership of production in the aftermath 
of the Soviet Union have the fortitude to sit in a 
duck blind so long for so small a bird. 

Out and out Communists are across the board 
ice- fishermen. Interestingly, so was Sen. Joe 
McCarthy. 

Back to Democratic hunting for a moment. 
Republicans enjoy stereotyping the Democrats 
as bureaucratic, can't do a thing without red 
tape. 

Gov. Joan Finney, a Democrat, went hunting 
last spring. A one-shot turkey shoot out western 
Kansas way. She tugged along her 
daughter/chief of staff Mary Holliday. 

They had never been hunting, and in order to 
legally hunt with a gun in Kansas, one must have 
finished a hunter safety course, and have been 
certified by a hunter safety instructor, unless the 
prospective hunter was bom before June 1,1957. 

Finney met the 1957 deadline with room to 
spare. But her daughter didn't. Neither did since- 
fired Secretary of Commerce Laura Nichols. 

Happy to be of help, the head of Kansas 
Wildlife and Parks, Jack Lacey, presented 
Nichols and Holliday with hunter safety 
certificates and signed them with a black pen. 
No 10 hours of training, just a certificate 
between political pals. 

Soon this was brought to public notice, and 
many Kansans laughed, including Attorney 
General and Republican Robert Stephan. 
Laughed Jack Lacey out of office. 

Il was another case of attempted upward 
hunting mobility. Since they were Democrats 
and first-time hunters, they should have begun 
with quail or pheasant, and then worked their 
way up to wild turkey. 



SPORTS DIGEST 



► CHIEFS FACE BILLS TONIGHT 

KANSAS CITY — It 
promises to be one busy week 
for the Kansas City Chiefs, 
finally home from Wisconsin. 

The Chiefs will host the 
Buffalo Bills Monday night and 
then will host Indianapolis 



Friday night in the fourth 
preseason contest. 

Monday's 7 p.m. kickoff is 
touted as a rematch of last 
year's trouncing of the 
defending AFC champion 33-S, 
also a Monday night game 



^McGwire on 1 5-day disabled 



BALTIMORE — Mark 
McGwire, whose 38 homer* 
lead the majors, on Sunday 
became the latest member of 
ihe Oakland Athletics to be 



placed on the disabled list. 

McGwire was put on the 1 5- 
day DL with a strained right rib 
cage he suffered last Friday 
against the Baltimore Orioles. 



FOOTBALL 4BBBJM 



It's a brand new season for K-State 



Wildcats are not taking anything for 

granted in preparations for this year 



STCVC ROCK 



Colle|Mn 

The Wildcat football team won 
more games in 1991 than any K- 
State team since 1934. 

But that was 1991. 

"We can't afford to take 
anything whatsoever for granted," 
said Cat coach Bill Snyder, ESPN's 
1991 National Coach of the Year. 
"We haven't even gotten close to 



the zenith yet." 

Indeed, the 1992 season is 
looked at as one of the most 
anticipated seasons in K-State 
history. 

By posting a 7-4 record a year 
ago, the Wildcats had their most 
successful season in nearly four 
decades. The four conference 
victories are more than the Cats 

■ See QUARTERBACK page 16 



K-STATE 

Vt 



FOOTBALL 



Sept. 16 


MONTANA 


Sept. 26 


TEMPLE 


Oct. 3 


NEW MEXICO STATE 


Oct. 10 


at Kansas 


Oct. 17 


at Utah Stale 


Oct. 24 


at Colorado 


Oct. 31 


at Oklahoma 


Nov 5 


IOWA STATE 


Nov. 14 


al Missouri 


Nov. 21 


OKLAHOMA STATE 


Dec. 5 


Nebraska (In Tokyo) 



6:30 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 
12:30 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
1:10 p.m. 
1 :30 p.rTl. 
7:00 p.m. 
1 00 p.m. 
1:10 p.m. 
9:00 p.m. 



BM 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 24, 1992 Q 



na 



h 



41 



Students pay for campus services and organizations 



It's a use it or lose it sort-of- 
thing. Students pay fees for the 
availability of K-State services. 

A full-time student pays $920.45 
in tuition and fees. Of that, $192.45 
is allotted to Campus Privilege 
Fees. , 

"These are benefit fees assessed 
to all students," said Keith Ratzloff, 
University controller. "They're 
really availability fees, whether you 
avail yourself of the services or 
not" 

The largest fee, $80. goes to 
Lafene Health Services. Whether 
Lafene is used is up to the student. 

"There are no exemptions to the 
fees," Ratzloff said, "even if a 
student has health coverage from 
another source, the student stilt pays 
for Lafene." 

Student Senate assesses fees to 
determine if it will continue to fund 
the organizations. 

"During the 1992-93 school 
year, there are several fees that are 
up for review by the Student 
Senate," said Sally Routson, 
assistant dean of student life. "That 



Chapter 
receives 
national 
recognition 



K- State's chapter of Associated 
General Contractors earned student 
chapter of the year simply by 
working together and helping 
others. 

AGC is not just a group for 
students studying construction 
science. It is a Washington, D.C., 
based lobbying organization, open 
to anyone. Members use their 
construction skills to work on 
community service projects. In 
addition to the standard, non- 
student chapters of AGC, there are 
roughly 1 00 student chapters. 

Brent Kortc, a senior in 
construction science, is serving his 
second term as chapter president. 
Korte said about 25 chapters 
applied for the competition. 

"They picked us as chapter of 
the year because they look heavily 
at community service. They want to 
see how much you help the campus 
and the community and how you 
help each other learn." 

The AGC members worked on a 
myriad of projects in the past year. 
Fall semester projects included 
repair work on Goodnow Cabin, 
constructing the American Legion 
Memorial on McCall Road, 
building an extension to a Sunset 
Zoo cage, and adding a sidewalk 
and playground at the Manhattan 
Crisis Center. They also moved the 
Children's Museum and 
constructed more than $10,000 
worth of playground equipment at 
Topeka Collegiate Elementary 
School. 

AGC members not only did the 
manual work involved in these 
projects, but also ordered materials 
and other paperwork involved. 

"I think that being a member of 
AGC is the way to go," said Ed 
Downey, a senior in construction 
science. "I had a lot of fun when I 
was pouring concrete at Sunset 
Zoo. It was great to know that I 
was helping out the community and 
making the zoo more enjoyable for 
other people when they visit" 

Korte also said helping others 
was his biggest gain from 
involvement in AGC. 

"It really impresses me to see 
that everyone's together, and it's 
not hard to get the group together 
to work on a community service 
project and give up a little time on 
a Saturday afternoon," he said. "1 
guess that's why I got pretty active 
in it." 

Another competition-deciding 
factor was the number of members 
who attended the AGC National 
Conference in Dallas in the 
summer. Korte said K-State sent 45 
AGC members, which was a larger 
contingent than that of Dallas' local 
chapter. 

"When we got down there we 
had to wear badges that said that 
we were students," Korte said. 
"Whenever someone would see or 
hear that you were a student they 
would say, 'Well, you must be 
from K-State.* That really 
impressed me." 

"When I found out the news I 
was realty excited," Downey said 
of the win. "It's a real honor to 
know that you're a part of 
something that's No. 1 in (he 
nation, and it make* you want to do 
even better." 



includes the Student Publications 
Inc. fees, the KSDB-FM 91.9 fee 
and the athletic fee," 

Currently. $4.80 goes to support 
the Collegian and the Royal Purple, 
and a $3.90 equipment fee is used 
to purchase computers for 
production of both. 

The KSDB fee is $.85 for 
operation and maintenance of the 
campus radio station. 

Senate reviews the $10 athletic 
fee every three years. 

"This fee covers the non- 
revenue-producing sports like 
baseball, swimming and track," 
Ratzloff said. 

Fine arts also gets its share as 
each student was assessed $7.40. 

"The fine arts fee keeps ticket 
prices low at McCain," Routson 
said. 

An $8 student activity fee helps 
to finance such groups as the Young 
Democrats and the College 
Republicans, the Black Student 
Union, Hispanic American 
Leadership Organization, Fone 
Crisis Center and the Rainforest 
Coalition. 

Other fee-assisted organizations 



include (he Sports Club Council, 
college councils and other 
honorariums. 

Multicultural Student Council, 
Native 
American 
Student Body 
and the Non- 
Traditional 
Student 
Association 
account for 
large 
expenditures 
from the $8 
activity fee. 
Student 
Legal 
Services 
receives 
$32,568 from 
the total 
student 
activity fee 
budget. 

The 
educational 
opportunity fund fee is used to aid 
(he academic achievement and 
progress of under- represented K- 
State students. 



benefit fees 

MMtMdtO 

all students. 
They're 
really 
availability 
fees, 

whether you 
avail 

yourself of 
the services 
or not. ■ 

KEITH RATZLOFF 



WaTakaTlp«l 

X A N i A S STATE 

COLLEGIAN 



flntemadonal news 
with a local flavor. 

mill Mill 



COLLEGIAN 







Physical 
Therapists 



001 

mv> Discover a c hallenging 
™ future with opportunities to 
advance. Serve your country 
while you serve your career with: 

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• complete medical and dental 
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Find out how to qualify as an Air 
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BLEACHERS 



1st Anniversary Party 
Friday, August 28th. 



* Prizes galore 
*Food specials 

* Drink specials 
*K-Rock remote 



523 S. 17th 



537-1484 



Several fees are used for the 
upkeep and maintenance of campus 
buildings. 

Student services support fees are 
used to finance the adaptation and 
equipping of Hoi ton Hall for 
improved delivery of student 
services programs. 

The K-State Union receives two 
fees to maintain the building — $27 
for day-to-day operation and S3 for 
repair and replacement. 

A total of $30.50 in fees covers 
refunding revenue bonds for KSU 
Stadium, the Union, and recreation 
buildings, as well as refunding the 
B rami age Coliseum bonds. Those 
bonds were issued to cover building 
costs. 

The Recreational Services fee is 
$8. It is used to support the Chester 
E. Peters Recreation Complex for 
equipment, interior upkeep and 
supplies. 

Resident and non-resident full- 
time students pay the same amount 
of fees. The big difference is the 
charge for tuitions. 

"Resident tuition covers 20 to 25 
percent of the cost of instruction," 
Ratzloff said. 



HOW YOUR MONEY IS SPENT 


Tuition 


Resident 


Non-Resident 


Undergraduate 


$728.00 


$2.814 00 


Graduate 


917 00 


3.027 00 


Veterinary Medicine 


1793 00 


5.858 00 


Educational Opportunity Fund 


600 


600 


Student Services Support 


300 


3.00 


Student Health 


80 00 


60.00 


K-State Union Repair and 






Replacement 


300 


3.00 


Student Fee Revenue Bonds: 






Refunding Bonds (Stadium, Union, 






Recreation BkJg | 


22.25 


22.25 


Coliseum Bonds 


8.25 


625 


Activity Fees 


eoo 


8.00 


K-State Union 


27.00 


27.00 


Student Publications 


4.60 


4.80 


Recreational Services 


6.00 


800 


KSDB -FM 


85 


85 


Athletics 


10.00 


10 00 


Fine Arts 


7.40 


740 


Student Publications Equipment 

Total Required Fees Per Semes 

Undergraduate 


390 


390 


ter pjpjpjBj 




$920.45 


$3.006 45 


Graduate 


1.109.45 


321945 


Veterinary Medicine 


1,965.45 


6.050 45 



LCtMUMSColegun 



Your Q 8 A about 



Q. How do I submit a 
news item? 

A. The Collegian welcomes any 
news tip, story or information about 
any special event. Call us at 532-6556. 
If there's time, give us a news release 
with your name, phone number and 
address. Include the who, what, 
when, where, why and how about 
your event. We don't run all releases, 
but we do publish newsworthy 
information for our student 
readership. 

Q. Whom can I talk to 
if I believe a story 
has an erior? 

A. The Collegian editor is the person 
to whom you should direct questions 
and complaints about stories. Call 
532-6556. Please leave a message with 
Student Publications if editor is not 
available. 

Qe How do I submit a 
letter to the editor? 

A. The Collegian welcomes all views 
about current issues. Letters should 
be signed, with the writer's name, 
address, phone number and ID for 
verification purposes. Letters are 
edited for space, punctuation and 
grammar, but not for content. 



Q* How do I place a 
classified ad? 

A. Stop by Kedzie 103, just east of 
the K-State Union. You can sell your 
unwanted items and buy the things 
you want in the Collegian classifieds. 
We take classified ads from 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. weekdays. 

Q. How do I place a 
display ad? 

A. Come to Kedzie 118, and one of 
our advertising representatives will 
be glad to work with you on ad 
campaigns or budgets. Call 532-6560 
for more information. 



Nantes and numbers to calk 




Samantha Farr 




Editor in chief 


6556 


Annette Spreer 




Advertising manager 


6560 


Ron Johnson 




Director/news adviser 


6555 


Gloria Frceland 




Associate director/advertising adviser 6555 


Linda Pnntney 




Assistant director/yearbook adviser 


6555 


Jackie Harmon 




Ad billing/special events 


6555 


Patricia Hudgins 


1 


Classified advertising manager 


6555 


Wanda Haynie 




Advertising production coordinator 


6555 


Ann Foster 




Bookkeeping/personnel manager 


6555 



KANSAS SI All 



OLLEGIAN 



532-6555 • Kc«.i/if 103 ljusi f.iM oi the K-State Union) 



w i L a t ii 

uumcr 




KSU 

Sprint Triathlon 




CENTER for 

FYFRriSF 

Tuttle Creek State Park, River Ponds Area r£$EARCH 
10:00am, Saturday, Septemoer 12, 1992 



.0.3 mile QW?) 9.9 mile *» 3.1 mile 
For information, calf Jason Bradley, 776-8082 



10 



August 24. t— 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



i 



. 



I 



i 



;,/ 



Professor receives national 
electrical 



Coltefan 

William Hudson arrived at K- 
Statc two yean ago with all of the 
credentials needed to be a professor 
in the College of Engineering. He 
has now added one more to the list. 

This summer, Hudson received 
the Institute of Electrical and 
Electronics Engineers Outstanding 
Branch Counselor and Adviaer 
Award. He was one of only seven 
advisers in the nation to earn this 
honor. There are more than 700 
IEEE chapters nationwide. 

Hudson said IEEE is one of the 
largest professional organizations 
around, and the K-State student 
chapter is a branch of the Kansas 
City IEEE chapter. 

"I really enjoy working with 
students," Hudson said. "When I 
came to K-Sute, they were looking 
for an adviser for IEEE. There was 
already a program, so it was easy to 
get things going.** 

In addition to his role as branch 
counselor, Hudson teaches 
computer engineering classes and 
does research on neural networks 
and adaptive aids. He also is an 
academic adviser for about 40 
students. 

Donald Rathbone, dean of the 

WACon 
warpath 
for women's 
rights 



NEW YORK— In a packed, 
sweltering meeting hall, the most 
potent women's group of the past 
20 years is preparing for battle. 

"Anita Hill woke us up!" yelled 
one woman from the back of the 
Women's Action Coalition 
meeting. "Let's back this up with a 
lot of noise!" 

Like the Women's Army Corps 
of old, WAC is on a mission it 
regards as serious as war — 
fighting for women's rights. Since 
it was formed in January. WAC has 
grown from a loose assortment of 
15 artists in downtown Manhattan 
to more than 2,000 women around 
the country. 

WAC chapters have sprung up 
in 50 major cities in the United 
States, and some abroad want to 
sum chapters. 

Like the AIDS activist group 
ACT UP. WAC specializes in 
"direct action." Last week, more 
than 100 WAC members protested 
at the Republican National 
Convention in Houston. 

The chapter has 50 committees 
that focus on everything from 
sexual harassment to the portrayal 
of women in advertising. 

Many WAC members say this is 
more rewarding than the more staid 
tactics of older groups like the 
National Organization for Women. 
"Trying to change the opinion 
makers in a calm, peaceful way 
doesn't work. Just ask Anita Hill." 
said Audrey Barry, 60, a retired 
teacher who attended last week's 



meeting. 



BLEACHERS 



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receives national {^fW /f T71~W/ 
engineering award \^\^1 V JL aC L/ X 

KILLS 



College of Engineering, said he 
noticed Hudson's compassion when 
he came to K -State. 

"He came across as a very caring 
and committed individual, both in 
terms of teaching and in research, 
especially toward the students," 
Rathbone said. "He is a very 
capable young man, and he is able 
to pull things 
together. The 
program was 
doing well 
before. 
Uniformly, 
we've been very 
strong on our 
record, and I 
feel that we are 
second to none 
as far as the Hudson 
national basis is 

concerned. I think that Bill Hudson 
is continuing that tradition. " 

Hudson's list of accomp- 
lishments includes work for such 
corporations as WBH Enterprises 
Inc. and Lindsay Manufacturing 
Co. He has also been affiliated with 
honorariums as Golden Key 
National Honor Society, Alpha Chi. 
Phi Kappa Phi, and Tau Alpha Phi. 

However, Hudson is all the more 
humble and credits his success of 
his recent award to IEEE members. 




"The award came about because 
the students are given the 
opportunity to make nominations 
and to write letters of support," 
Hudson said. "I really had nothing 
to do with it." 

Hudson also credits his students 
for their own success in IEEE, 
which should lead them to 
successful careen in engineering. 

They realize that strong student 
organizations heavily make up the 
educational process," he said. "1 
think student involvement in groups 
is mandatory, because you can't be 
a good engineer without being a 
good communicator in a group. The 
students run this organization. All I 
do is a little encouraging and 
guiding every now and then." 

It may have been this attitude 
that inspired students to nominate 
Hudson. 

"He's a very good teacher — a 
student's teacher," said Tim 
Sanders, senior in computer 
engineering and IEEE treasurer. 
"He understands what students are 
going through and he remembers 
what it is like to be a student. He 
lets us do what we want to. He's an 
adviaer. He just tries to steer us in 
the right direction if we get off 
track." 






Stay Cool- 
Get in Shape with 
Rec Services!! 




Place: Natatorltim 
M.W. Noon-12:45 
M.T, TH, 7:30 
Begins Mon. Aug 24 



y/ 




Place: Rec Complex 
M-F 6:30 a.m. 
M-r 11:45 a.m. 
M-THURS 4:20 p.m. 
M-FR1 5:30 p.m. 
Begin* lion. Aug 24 



For info, call: 532-6980 

*No preragi strati on required. Participation tree with a 

validated student ID. 



4 Nautilus' 

Manhattan's Only Total Fitness Club 




a month 



Check 

our low 

semester rate* 

and group 

discounts 



f 100 MORO -AGGIEVILLE * (91 3) 776-1934 
MANHATTAN * KS * $6502 



It's no joke! 

You'll freak for the psychopathic 
comedy of Chicago City Limits 
and McCain's other wild events. 
Whether you're dressed dews* or 
dressed to kiU, you'll fit in with 
the McCain crowd. 

No kidding! 

K -State students gel half-price 
tickets to all events. No coupons 
to clip. No waiting uittil 10 
minutes before curtain time. 
Just show your ID and you'll 
tet tickets for as little as $6. 

It's no laughing matter! 

Bay s ticket to all 15 events and 
pay less than $4 per show. 
Fifteen shows is too much? 
Bay a pair of passes and split the 
cost with friends. 

Call 532-6428 

Call for tickets or stop by the 
McCain Auditorium box office, 
9 a jh. to noon aad 1 pjn. to 
5 p.m. weekdays. VISA aad 
MasterCard accepted. 




The Incomparable 
Red Stars 

Red Army Chorus and Dane* 

Knicmbk 

The Russians are coming! Moscow 
reds Manhattan a company of 130 for 
us only Kuuu performance of 
Russia 'a haunting traditional songs, 
ipeclaculw folk dances, and inspiring 
classical music Don't miss this group's 
first North American lour. 
Sunday, September 13, 3 p.m.* 

Marcus Roberts and 
Ellis Marsalis 

Duo pianist) 

Two jazz sun take center stage for an 
evening of improv inspired by Ellington, 
Monk, and Jelly Roll Morton. Marcus 
Roberts played with Wynlon Marsalis 
and has recorded three chart -lopping 
solo albums. Ellis Marsalis, New 
Orleans' patriarch of jazz, has nurtured 
an entire generation of jazz players, 
including Harry Cormick, Jr., and sons 
Wynion and Branford. 
Friday, September 251 

Danza Azteca de Anahuac 

A "M isstc of the Americas" 
production of the Santa Fe Chamber 
Music Festival 

Witness a fixe dance performed on 
glowing coals and the fascinating 
ceremonial dances of the Aztecs, Mayas, 
and Tohccs Drums, ranks, and whistles 
provide authentic accompaniment. 
Sunday, September 27, 3 p.-a» 

Lend Me a Tenor 

Sneak behind the scenes of a gala opera 
for an evening of Man Brothers- style 
shenanigans. This Tony Award 
winning farce follows a world-famous 
tenor who's loo "ill" to perform and a 
gofer who fancies himself a great 
singer. Nonstop laughter guaranteed. 
FrMay, October 23* 

The Waverly Consort 

Muate to the Year 1492: The Age of 

t oh— in i 

To mark the 300ih anniversary of 
Columbus' voyage, 10 brilliant singers 
and players trace the Christian, Jewish, 
and Muslim threads that form the 
fascinating fabric of Spanish culture. 
Saturday, October 31- 

Sergio and Odair Assad 

Duo guitarists 

Bored by Bach? Sample the sizzling 
sounds of these Brazilian brothers as 
they explore the wealth of South 
American folk and contemporary music. 
Sunday, November S, 3 p.m.' 

Fiddler on the Roof 

If I Were a Rid) Man.'" "Maichmaaer," 
"Sunriae, Siaset." and To Ufe" make 
this 1991 Tony Award-wirsiing Best 
Revival Musical one of Broadway's 
best. The New York Times call* it "one 
of the most glowing creations in the 
history of musical theatre," 
Saaday, November 22, 7 J6 p.m. 



The Nutcracker 

Tuba Ballet Theatre 

With iu ever fresh Tchaikovsky score, 

a set that's as attractive as a Currier end 

Ives engraving, and 30 local children, this 

Nutcracker will warm even • Scrooge'i 

heart. 

Thursday and Friday, Decembers 

and 4,7:30 p.m.- 

The Nash Ensemble of 
London 

Imaginative programs have won the 
Nash loyal followers in both concert 
halls and record shops. Their McCain 
concert features works by Mozart, 
Debussy. Ravel, and Dvorak. 
Saturday, January 30* 

The Holmes Brothers 

Melding their vocals into glorious three- 
part harmonies, this powerful trio 
combines gulbucket blues, red-clay soul. 
and ecstatic gospel with hints of country, 
furik. and rock to create a style that is 
timeless and original. 
Saturday, February 6* 

The 101 Dalmatians 

The Arvada ChJIdre a 's Theatre 

Watch out! CrueDa De Vil b on the 
loose, hunting for dogs to nab. Audience 
members help Pongo and Missus find 
then- puppies in this beloved adventure. 
You'll be (mitten with puppy love. 
Sunday, February 21, 3 p.m.* 

Carmen 

New York City Opera National 
Company 

An alluring gypsy heroine, a handsome 
bullfighter, and mysterious smugglers 
recreate Bizet's powerful evocation of 
Spain in a brand-new production. 
Carmen is simg in French, but English 
language supenillcs clarify the action. 
You won't miss a word. 
Friday, March 12* 

Australian Chamber 
Orchestra 

Daniel Mc Kef way, clarinet soloist 
The award- winner who delighted 
McCain audiences in 1991 returns with 
an orchestra for works by Janacek, 
Weber. HaruSk, and Haydn. 
Wednesday, March 17* 

Chicago City Limits 

Strap yourself in! Chicago City Limits 
specializes in psychopathic comedy 
performed without a net. Their improvi- 
tational ski Is have caused irreparable 
damage to aiwiirncrs across the country 
Prepare to shout your suggestions. 
Saturday, April 3 

Da Capo Chamber Players 

An unusual combination of bistrurnena 
and distinctive repertory have made the 
Da Capo a favorite with audience* 
•con the country. 
Saturday, April 24* 



PUBLICATION PACKER 

We are looking for an Individual to pack and ship our 
books and publications. The hours are basically 1 -5 p.m. 
Mon-Frl. but can be flexible to meet school needs. The 
Individual should be energetic, organized and very detail 
oriented. 

If interested, send a resume\ or stop by the Learning 
Resources Network (LERN) 1550 Hayes Dr.. for an 
application. Send all correspondence to the attention of Kelly 
Adams. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

CAMPUS «■■■■■■■■■ 



August 24, 1992 ■* 4 






Students have questions 
on fee payment system 



muLLMm 

L'otkfMD 

Thousands of students walk 
through Aheara Field House to pay 
their fees each semester. Every 
time, students question whether the 
system is working and if changes 
should be made to help students 
feel less confused. 

Many students thought the fee 
payment system was confusing and 
needed to be better organized. 
However, Pamela Cole, senior in 
accounting, said fee payment ran 
smoothly considering the large 
number of students. 

"They do it the best way they 
can — by labeling everything — 
especially with the mass of students 
who come through here." Cole said. 

Most of the problems that 
students face during fee payment 
are delinquencies or financial aid 
problems. 

Steve O'Neil said he wished the 
financial aid checks could be 
handled before the day of fee 
payment. When he called to ask, 
they told him it had to be done that 
day. 

"I don't understand why they 
can't do emergency student loans 
and fee deferment ahead of time." 
he said. "1 also think it would help 
to stretch it out over a longer period 
of time instead of three days." 

One thing that changed this year 
was the location where parking 
tickets are paid and permits were 
purchased. 

As of July I , K -Slate Police and 
Parking Services separated. 



"At least It 
gave ma a 
chance to 
see a lot of 
people I 
haven't seen 
In a long 
time. 

KELLEE FRENCH 



Students 
must now 
go to Burt 
Hall. As a 
c o n - 
venience to 
students. 
Parking 
Services set 
up a table at 
the Union 
for ticket 
payment 
and permit 
purchases. 

Renee Lee, senior in arts and 
sciences, said the new location for 
ticket payment is fine, but she was 
never notified of the change. 

"I had to go all over campus 
looking for the ticket payment 
place. I first stopped by the campus 
police station where the sign said to 
go to Bun Hall. When I got to Bun 
Hall they said all tickets had to be 
paid at the Union," Lee said. "By 
the time I even got to Aheam to pay 
fees it had taken 45 minutes to get 
rid of my delinquencies." 

Lee wasn't the only student who 
was confused by the change. Kellee 
French, senior in human ecology, 
said the slip of paper she received 
when she started through the line at 
Ahearn said she was delinquent, 
and listed Bun Hall as the place to 
pay for all parking tickets. 

The amount of time it takes to 
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junior in English. Before Lincoln 
could receive the financial aid for 
which she had waited in line, she 




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Erin Turner, freshman in 
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Many students suggested 
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A A August 24, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



1992 REPUBLICAN CONVENTION 



Acceptance speech had 
something for everyone 



DAW 



Col It, an 

Bush is back. 

After several weeks of sagging 
poll standings, campaign questions 
and bad press, President Bush was 
nominated again as the candidate 
for the Republican ticket at the 
party's convention last week in 
Houston. 

Bush had something for 
everyone in the Astrodome and the 
huddled masses in front of 
televisions across America in his 
nomination speech. No political 
stone was left unturned. 

He said he regretted his 1990 
decision to raise taxes after he had 
promised the American people they 
could read his lips: no new taxes. 

"Two years ago 1 made a bad 
call on the Democrats' tax increase. 
I underestimated Congress' 
addiction to taxes. With my back 
against the wall, I agreed to a hard 
bargain: One tax increase one time, 
in return for the toughest spending 
limits ever." 

Abortion was not nearly the 
mum subject at (he GOP convention 
as it was at the Democratic National 
Convention in New York last 
month. Some speakers were 
actually able to express their 
disagreement with the party's pro- 
life platform. Bush, however, held 
the line. 

"I happen to believe very deeply 
in the worth of each individual 
human being, bom or unborn, " he 
said. 

Bush said many of the country's 
problems could be traced to the 
"gridlock Democratic Congress." 
Though many Republican speakers 
at the convention invoked the name 
of the late president Harry S. 
Truman, the theme of the week was 
"Throw the Democrat bums out. 
It's their fault." 

"It wasn't always this way," 
Bush said. "I served in Congress 22 
years ago. Back then, we 
cooperated. We didn't get personal. 
We put the people above everything 
else." 




DAVID MAYM^Ie 

President Bush debarks from Air Force On* in Topeka during a visit 
to support the campaign of former Gov. Mike Hayden. 



The buzzword issue of health 
care made its way into nearly every 
speech, but Bush was perhaps the 
toughest on the issue. He said 
Clinton's plan for a national health- 
care program would actually 
decrease the quality of the nation's 
health-care system. 

"We don't need my opponent's 
plan for a massive government 
takeover of health care, which 
would ration health care and deny 
you the right to choose your 
doctor," he said. "Who wants a 
health-care system with the 
efficiency of the House post office 
and the compasssion of the KGB?" 

Though many Americans and a 
great deal of the press have 
criticized Bush for his attention to 
foreign policy and his inattention to 
domestic issues. Bush said he did it 
for Americans. 

"As if it didn't matter that school 
children once hid under their desks 
in drills to prepare for nuclear war," 
Bush said, "I saw the chance to rid 
our children's dreams of the nuclear 
nightmare, and I did. ... I seized 
those opportunities for our kids and 



grandkids, and I make no apologies 
for that." 

Bush said Clinton was so wishy- 
washy on the issues he has been 
seen in "more places than Elvis 
Presley." The president also 
invoked the name of the King for 
Clinton's ' tax-and-spend" 

economic plans. 

"If he gets his way, hardware 
stores across America will have a 
new sign up: 'Closed for despair. 
Bush said. "I guess you'd say his 
plan really is 'Elvis Economics.' 
America will be checking into the 
Heartbreak Hotel." * 

Bush's speech ended a week of 
Republican partying that led to his 
nomination for the presidency. But 
even though he received nigh- 
universal accolades by the 
Republicans at the convention, he 
wasn't received well by all. 

Members of ACT UP (the AIDS 
Coalition to Unleash Power) posing 
as reporters infiltrated a Republican 
National Committee Gala Luncheon 
at which Bush spoke earlier in the 
week and chanted "What about 
AIDS?" at the president. 



Bush's nomination now official 



OAVID FRESE 
IOSKOOO 



Col letup 

Republicans chose (heir presidential candidate 
last week in a Texas baseball stadium, accompanied 
by an indoor fireworks display. 

President Bush became the official candidate 
Thursday night at the 1992 Republican National 
Convention in the Houston Astrodome. 

In his acceptance speech. Bush deflected 
criticism away from his administration and toward 
the Democrat controlled Congress, calling it a 
"roadblock at the other end of Pennsylvania 
Avenue," 

The convention began Monday with adoption of 
the platform, a 1 23-page formal declaration of goals 
and policies endorsed by the Republican Party. 
Many political observers consider it to be much 
more conservative than previous platforms. 

Despite a fight by pro-choice Republicans, the 



platform is bluntly pro-life, supporting "a human life 
amendment to the Constitution. We believe the 
unborn child has a fundamental individual right to 
life ..." 

Many Republicans wore buttons in the 
Astrodome that read "71% Can't Be Wrong," 
referring to a pre-convention poll which found a 
large pro-choice sentiment within the party. 

Even First Lady Barbara Bush, who spoke 
Wednesday night after Marilyn Quayle, said before 
the convention that "pro-choice or pro-life ... this 
issue has no place in the platform." 

Mike Aylward, a 1987 K-State agronomy 
graduate, served on the platform committee and the 
subcommittee on land, food, and resources. 

Aylward suggests the fight to include the abortion 
plank may have hurt the platform overall. 

"I think there were a few people put on (the 
platform committee) because of one certain issue, 

■ See CONVENTION page 14 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 24, 1992 «f O 



Junction City drug problems magnified by shooting 



JUNCTION CITY — Sitting at 
the cross-section of an Army base, 
K-State and an interstate highway, 
Junction City has become a magnet 
for drug dealers and crime. 

In a revelation of that dark side, 
a county drug prosecutor was shot 
Aug. 1 1 in a brazen act of violence 
(hat stunned residents and made 
headlines nationwide. 

But the shooting of Eric 
Stonecipher by a masked gunman 
was not an isolated incident — it 
merely served to remind residents 
of how far the city has to come to 
overcome its problems. 

Downtown shoppers complain 
about drug dealers roving outside 
stores during evening hours. 
Residents with no interest in drugs 

Allen says 
he may 
marry 
his lover 

ASSOCIATED 



tick off the locations of city dope 
houses. Soldiers and teen-agers 
boast they can make a drug buy 
within 20 minutes. 

"You can't even be safe in your 
own house," said Paula Former, 17. 
"You don't walk alone in this 
town." 

At a news conference last week, 
Stonecipher said Junction City's 
surroundings make the city 
vulnerable to the violence of the 
drug trade. 

"We've got a multimillion dollar 
payroll every month going through 
Junction City from the Army base, 
not to mention the problems you 
have from 20,000 college students 
and dependents." he said. "You've 
got a transient community and an 
awful lot of money from the 
government going through here. An 



awful lot of disposable income. 

"We've had Jamaicans, (drug 
dealers from) Detroit, New York, 
Los Angeles, Panamanians. We've 
had them all through here. They're 
here because it's profitable." 

Fort Riley boosts the population 
of 18- to 25-year-olds to unusually 
high levels. And K State in 
Manhattan supplies another 20.000 
college-age people. 

Furthermore, police say 
Interstate 70 is a pipeline for illegal 
narcotics. The highway goes 
through Junction City. 

In the last year, violence 
surrounding the city's drug trade 
has increased with two drug -related 
murders and a war between Detroit 
and Jamaican drug rings. 

Former Junction City Police 
Chief Jerry Smith said conditions 



were ripe for a violent incident like 
the Stonecipher shooting. 

"It was just a matter of time," 
said Smith, who retired last month 
after 13 years as chief. "It was 
going to happen." 

In 1990, Geary County ranked 
third statewide with a rate of 77.6 
serious crimes per 1 .000 people. 
The ranking dropped to 10th last 
year during the Persian Gulf war, 
when soldiers left (he area for the 
first part of the year. 

Twenty-six percent of all 
inmates sent by Geary County to 
state prisons have been convicted of 
a drug offense, according to a grant 
application the county filed this 
year. That is more than any other 
county. 

Adult drug arrests in Junction 
City have increased steadily. 



NEW YORK — Woody Allen 
says it's possible he'll marry the 
adopted daughter of his lover for 12 
years, Mia Farrow. 

Allen told Newsweek magazine 
that his relationship with Soon-Yi 
Previn began when he took her to a 
New York K nicks pro basketball 
game a little more than a year ago. 
Until then, he said, he "never had 
any interest in her at all." 

Allen told the magazine last 
week that the two went to another 
game about a month later and 
"gradually over a period of time a 
strictly talking relationship 
developed," he said. 

"Only long after the relationship 
with Mia was finished did it very 
gradually drift into an intimate 
relationship." the filmmaker said. 

Asked if marriage is a 
possibility, Allen replied: 
"Possible, uh-huh." 

Allen is 56. Previn has no birth 
certificate but is estimated as being 
"TJetween 19 and 21. She was bom 
in Korea and adopted from an 
orphanage in that country by 
Farrow and Andre Previn, the 
pianist-conductor who was 
Farrow's husband at the time. 

Allen has been married twice: to 
Harlene Rosen, his high school 
sweetheart, and actress Louise 
Lasser. 

Soon-Yi Previn gave a statement 
to Newsweek, saying of her 
relationship with Allen: "I admit 
that it's offbeat, but let's not get 
hysterical," 

Allen confirmed the romance 
after he sued Farrow about 10 days 
ago for custody of their biological 
son, Satchel. 4 1/2; their adopted 
son, Moses, 14; and their adopted 
daughter, Dylan, 7. 

Connecticut and New York 
authorities were investigating 
allegations that Allen had sexually 
abused Dylan. Allen's publicist. 
Leslee Dart, said Sunday that Allen 
voluntarily met with New York 
child-welfare officials last week. 



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according to police reports. During 
a 10-month reporting period in 
1988 and 1989, there were 87 such 
arrests. During a similar period in 
1991 and 1992. arrests siood at 145. 

"It's unbelievable, isn't it?" said 
Danny Jackson, a detective with the 
Geary County Drug Task Force. 
"The problem is more under control 
now than it was maybe a year ago. 
But I don't think it's under control, 
no." 

County Attorney Chris Biggs 



described Junction City's problems 
as a microcosm of whai police find 
in major cities. 

"Anytime you have a major 
influx of money into a community, 
you're always going to create an 
underground economy," he said. 

Authorities are focusing on out- 
of-town suppliers to get at the root 
of the problem. Biggs said. 

"Right now, 1 think we can make 
as many cases as we have agents," 
Biggs said. 




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A A August 24, 1092 



Convention draws protests 



CONTINUED FROM PACE 12 

and that was their main interest, so 
a few of them didn't know about 
the other issues," he said. 

He said he was very pleased with 
the planks concerning agriculture. 

"We have seven pages 
addressing agriculture whereas the 
Democrats have just one or two 
paragraphs," he said. 

While some Republicans mildly 
protested the platform, more vocal 
protesters gathered in a public park 
across from the Astrodome. 

Members of ACT UP, the 
National Abortion Rights Action 
League, and the National 
Organization for Women 
demonstrated periodically during 
the convention in the park east of 
the Astrodome. 

Protesters demonstrated against 
the Bush administration's policies 
toward Iraq, Serbia, and Israel. 

Bill Maris, a POW-MIA 
protester from Alabama, said. 
"We're mostly Ross Perot 
supporters. We wouldn't be here if 
he hadn't quit." 

The protesters seemed media- 
conscious, and there were 
allegations that photographers 



prodded two teen-agers Thursday 
night to bum a flag. The teen-agers 
were taken into custody by mounted 
police officers in riot gear. 

"Those kids didn't intend to do 
it." Maris said. "They weren't 
gonna do it until he (a photographer 
with press credentials around his 
neck) threw them a lighter." 

Houston police closed the park 
at 1 1 each night, always before the 
convention recessed. 

"We didn't see much of the 
protesters," said Kansas Delegate 
Lila McCtaflin of Tecumseh. 

The convention seems to have 
increased the ticket's standing in 
the polls. According to Sunday's 
New York Times, Democratic 
candidate Bill Clinton's lead over 
Bush has been chopped down from 
20 percent to 8 percent. 

Heavy media exposure of a high- 
energy event is one reason for the 
increase, according to Kansas 
Delegate Lila McClallin. 
Describing the frenzied nature of 
the convention, her husband. Don. 
said. "It's like junior high kids at a 
senior high basketball game." 

Although perhaps premature, 
conventioneers have already begun 
speculating who the party's 



candidate will be in 1996. 

Most of the speculation, 
welcome or not, was directed at 
convention speakers. 

Unsuccessful 1992 nominee and 
columnist Pat Buchanan spoke 
Monday night and called for "the 
Buchanan Brigade. ..to come home 
and stand beside George Bush." 

Buchanan's choice of the word 
"beside" instead of the traditional 
"behind" may indicate the support 
Buchanan gives to Bush is tenuous. 

Tuesday's keynote speaker Phil 
Gramm, Texas' junior senator, was 
the subject of much 1996 
speculation, as were Housing and 
Urban Development Secretary Jack 
Kemp and former Secretary of 
Labor Lynn Martin. 

Quayle's acceptance speech 
continued the family values theme. 

"When family values are 
undermined, our country suffers," 
he said. 

Kansas Sen. Bob Dole 
introduced President Bush, in a 
night which included speeches by 
Vice President Dan Quayle, former 
President Gerald Ford and "The 
Star Spangled Banner" sung by 
Tanya Tucker. 



Florida wakes up to Hurricane Andrew 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

belter. "Those coconuts are like 
cannonballs; they can blast through 
concrete at that speed." 

Meteorologists reported shortly 
after 6 p.m. that the eye of the 
hurricane passed over northern end 



of Eleuthera in the Bahamas with 
gusts up to 1 20 mph. 

Landfall in southern Florida was 
expected between 6 a.m. and S a.m. 
Monday, hurricane specialist Max 
May field said. Winds of 156 mph 
could sweep downtown Miami and 



up to 10 inches of rain were 
forecast. 

At 10 p.m. EDT. the center of 
the hurricane was located about 1 50 
miles east of Miami. The location 
was near 25 degrees 4 minutes 
north latitude and 77 degrees 9 



Some Brooks tickets 
allocated to students 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Chief: Officer 
passed check 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

allocation of tickets for our 
students, and. to our surprise, they 
agreed." 

Because of that. Thomas 
compliments Brooks and his staff. 

"Most artists have no idea when 
tickets even go on sale." Thomas 
said. "Brooks, however, is truly 
involved with alt facets of 



production and has been known to 
show up almost anywhere, from 
setting up the stage to adjusting the 
lights. He truly cares about his 
fans." 

KTPK-FM 106.9 employees will 
be at the coliseum Aug. 31 to assist 
with the lottery. There will be 50- 
cent cokes and hot dogs for lottery 
participants. 



Kitchings: 'I 
plead innocent' 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

charged with selling drugs over the 
phone or trying to buy drugs over 
the phone. I plead innocent." 

Kitchings said he was thankful 
for all the people who helped him 
through the ordeal. 

"1 hope 1 can get it over as soon 
as possible, so my name can be 
cleared of this matter." Kitchings 
said. 

Folse was not available for 
comment at press time. 

The citywidc raid yielded 
$20,000 in cash, 15 pounds of 
marijuana with a $40,000 street 
value, cocaine valued at $2,000, six 
cars valued at $30,000. rifles, 
shotguns, handguns, pagers, 
telephones and drug paraphernalia. 

Members of the Kansas Bureau 
of Investigations, Kansas Highway 



Patrol, RCPD and K-Stale Police 
participated in the raid. 

"Some of the agents had been 
involved since January, when the 
department picked up some drug 
activity," Gee said. "We worked 
together three months and built 
cases up on surveillance." 

Gee said the police had warrants 
for all those arTestcd and were later 
able to write warrants for those who 
had bought drugs from the alleged 
dealers. 

K State Police Chief Charles 
Beckom said the campus officers 
were resources for the other 
agencies involved. 

"We were part of it for a long 
lime." Beckom said. "Our resources 
and officers were in it for several 
months. We just provided human 
resources and technical resources." 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Woodruff failed the background 
check. 

"We do a very extensive 
background check with all 
employees who are hired," 
Beckom said. "We found nothing 
to indicate why we shouldn't hire 
him," 

Woodruff is presently on 
suspension from the campus police 
force. 

SGA trying to 
do what it can 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

ideas that the BSU (memorandum) 
mentioned." 

That sense of having hands tied 
extends to the minors program as 
well. At this point, the issue is out 
of SGA hands and squarely in the 
laps of Faculty Senate. 

"Faculty Senate and the 
Academic Affairs committee have 
listed it on their priority list for 
fall." McClaskey said. "Our goal 
from the beginning has been to 
have it in place for the fall of 
1993." 

For that to happen. Faculty 
Senate will have to approve the 
program by the end of this 
semester. 

SGA will officially kick off its 
year with a retreat Aug. 29-30. 






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we obtain a copy (legally, of course) of a 
day's showing, we are going to five you 
the rundown on what happened on that 
particular day. If you are worried about 
missing a day, don't worry. It is perfectly 
legal to photocopy each and every episode 
because we have the written consent from 
the commissioner of major' league 




BVSUEMRMUM 



baseball. 

You'll quickly realize some subtle 
differences between Russian soap stars and 
their American counterparts — namely 
personal hygiene, language, culture, etc. 
Always remember that the names of the 
people who star in "One Day to Live" 
have been changed to protect their 
identities, and any similarities are merely 
coincidental. Therefore, if you want to sue 
me because your parakeet has the same 
name as Vladimir Groinpull. tough mule 
muffins. 

Pick up the Collegian lommorrow for 
another exciting episode of ONE DAY TO 
LIVE. 




Tk. Ok DA tMAAA .' 
I'M SIVPENiQVS MAM 




f VIRTVMkL REAUT*\ 
I HAS NOTHING OH J 
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SSENTIALS 



Tfour source for the comics and the 
crossword. Look for new feature*. 



CROSSWORD 



EUGENE SHEFFER 



THE STRIP 



DAVID SWEARING EN 




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THAT LOST fotff V0b 
FACE ( CUTE rtUh f ) 

Purple Book Bag 3 

FlLLEO To CAfACJTY W^ 

with Taa&coxs 

( JUST 1M £MC ) 

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THE fmtsr IN 
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CLASS ScHCPUlC 

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couturier 

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stock-in- 
trad* 

8 Word attar 
40 Across, 
often 
12 Excite to 
anger 

14 Backward 
opera 
star? 

15 Coconut 
cookie 

16 Spanish 
movie 



JIM'S JOURNAL 



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leader 
Brown 

18 Muffle 
20 Spoils of 

war 

23 Play- 
wright 
Connelly 

24 Medley 

25 Small 
cogwheels 

28 Encore 

29 December 
visitor 

30 "Be — 
Guest* 
(song) 

32 Requires 

34 Gain as 
profit 

35 Helpful 
devices 

36 Heart and 



head 


lyricist 


followers 


3 Grampus 


37 One 


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having 


theater 


great 


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wisdom 


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phrase 


resort 


41 — avis 


6 "Who 


42 Pasta 


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48 Certain 


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movie) 

21 Anagram 
for idol 

22 Seine 
feeder 

23 Tends to 

25 Universal 
to a 

epidemi- 
ologist 

26 Early 
boatman 

27 "Of 
courser 

29 Cloth or 
fish lead- 
in 

31 Hospital 
VIPs 

33 Bright- 
colored 
parrots 

34 Two- 
handed 
card 
game 

36Jai — 

37 Spheres 8-24 

38 Steak 
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39 Length 



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48 (heSi) Today's Cryptoquip clue: B equals W 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



4 



\ 



— ■ . — — — ■ 



August 24, 1002 4E 




LASSIFIEDS 



GET THE WORD OUT 

PUCE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN KEDZIE 103 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



1DAY 

2 DAYS 

3 DAYS 

4 DAYS 

5 DAYS 



- 



20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

20 words or less — 

each word over 20 

(consecutive day 



$5 

— $.20 per word 

$6.25 

— $.25 per word 

— $7.25 

— $.30 per word 

$8 

— $.35 per word 

$8 50 

— $.40 per word 
rate) 



HOW TO MY 

Al ctanRltds mat be pexj m ***** 
IssU 



Gash, check, saiiltiCtid or Vm i re 
accepted Them it i tiOienricachsrga 
oo eft reii&iiid. checsj. 

W» rtssrve the rtgfrt to «dtt repel or 

property classify Mr en\ 



Fer m tdra dwrgt, ml put i 
haedMrM above your ad 10 csttrt rho 
leader's attention. 



ClessrfPc eds must bt placed by 
noon tha day Mora mi date you mot 
yew at to run. CtmflW otepier ads 
must be pieced by 4 p.m. mo wotting 
days prior » tht date you want your td 

10 AM 

FREE FOUND ADS 

»U « nrvtet to yoUi w iw tound idi 
F9f ttpoi stay % tf^t oJ onifQOi 



CANCELLATIONS 

H you sen your htm Otter* your ad 
ha* txpired, m wW rotund you for the 
remaining, days 

Vbu tmiil call us baton) noon mi day 
thaadtotobcpubHihtd. 

CORRECTIONS 

K you find an trior in your ad, phase 
cat ua, Wt accept naaponaibHiiy onty 
lor the Brat wrong insertion. 



Call 532-6555 to place your classified. 




PARKING 

OF THE 
UNION 



w°m ORWRITE 

532- 8555 cqihouh classibbos 

a* a u l\*V%aV^O le^MVVSeaasft 

Kedtte Hall 109 

532-7309 



OFFICE HOURS 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 

8 a.m. '5 p.m. 

(iicept holidays) 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 




ADVANCED FLIGHT 
Training. Multi-engine, 
instrument commercial, 
ATP, CFI ratings. 
Private and instrument 
ground school. 

Hugh Irvin at 639-3128 
evenings. 

ATTENTION LADIES! 
Take time to schedule a 
froa Mary Kay facial ! Mary 
Kay is a top- 
line skin care program. 
Invite some friends. 
It's double the fun II Call 
Karla Matson at 
539-4342. 

COME FLY with us, K- 
Stata Flying Club has 
Five airplanes. For best 
prices call Sam 
Knipp, 639-6193 after 
5:30p.m. 

SMART ONE day diet' 
Rid 15 to 20 pounds 
in 30 quick days. Enjoy 
summer! "Free 

Samples - (800)395-3978 



Tennis Anyone? 

Cottonwood 
Racquet Club 

•Indoor Tennis 
•Free Weights 
•Racquetball 

776-6060 3615ClaiUn 



JOIN THE 
KANSAS STATE UNTV. 
ROWING TEAM I 



HAVE FUN 

AND GET IN SHAPE 1 

INFORMATION 

MEETING: 

THURS. AUG. 27, I99J.I 

7 PM 

DENISONRM 1 13 A 



Q2Q— 



Only found ads can 
be placed free of 
charge). 




We raquire a form 
of picture ID (KSU or 



KEL— HAVE a great 
semester! Jen 




HOUSING/ 

REAL ESTATE 



105*- 



CLOSE TO campus 
very nice, one, two, 
three and four-bedroom* 
Apartment com- 



plexes and houses with 
great prices 

537-2919, 537-1666 

NEWLY REMODELED 
three-bedroom, two 
bath, one-half block from 
campus. No 

pet*. 776-1340. 



1 1 0- 

I Vim 



f Of Rtnf* 



CLOSE TO campus 
very nice, one, two, 
trtree and four-bedrooms. 
Apartment com 

plexes and houses with 
great prices 

537-2919, 537-1666 

LARGE TWO 

BEDROOM, west side 
location 
Pool, central air 

dishwasher, activities 
Available now. $449 539 
7489. 

TWO BEDROOMS with 
deck and fireplace. 
Great location overlooking 
pool and ten- 

nis court West Manhattan. 
I'll carry your 

deposit, rent negotiable. 
Call evenings 

and weekends. 776-6763. 



WANTED 

Students looking for 

living accommodations 

with ther own 

bedroom, In unit 

amenities include: 

* Dishwasher 

* Miavwim 
iWxhm&Dry&s 
Complex also includes: 

* Hot Tubs 

« Sand Voileybill Courts 

As low as: 
$ 195/month per person 
Call for an appointment 



776-3804 





OWN ROOM in a new 
house. $200 a month 
plus one-fourth utilities. 
Call Craig at 776- 
6573. 




TWO BEDROOM 
HOUSE, two and one-half 
miles from Town Center on 
Highway 24. 

776-1340. 




NONSMOKING 
FEMALE roommate to 
share 
two-bedroom duplex. Call 
776-0402. 

ONE- THREE non- 
smoking femelea, farm- 
house, barn, pasture for 
horses, cattle, 

dogs. Prefer Veterinary, 
Animal Science, 

Horticulture majors. 
Possible rant in ex- 
change for horse training 
or light cattle and 
horse chores. 776-1205, 
8pm- 9pm or P. 
O Box 1211. 

OPENING FOR two 
male student roommates 

in a three -bed room, one 
and one-half 

bath apartment in a 
complex 537-7087 
or 537-2470. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
two blocks from cam- 
pus. Own room SI 37.00 
per month. Call 
537-8910. 

SERIOUS, NON- 
SMOKING female 
roommate 
to share e one-bedroom 
apartment-- par- 



tially furnished. Call 539- 
7586, 

THREE BEDROOM ON 
Hillcrest witt) two oth- 
ers, walking distance KSU. 
Laundry 
facilities, garage $235/ 
month. Leave 

massage with Karen 539- 
7495. 




SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



205 



Tatar 



TUTORING HELP 
available for math, physics, 
and FORTRAN pro- 
gramming. Call Chetan 
at 537-1539 



225SH 




MUSICIANS: RHYTHM 
guitar, keyboard, fid- 
dle, and steel players 
needed for an es- 
tablished country band. 
539-7265 or 587- 
0384 

WANTED: 
ALTERNATES for <doo- 
wop! vocal 

group Need first tenor 
with high falsetto 
and low bass. Perform 
around State, even- 
ings and w eekends. Good 
pay. 776-4999, 

537-1741 




A LITTLE extra cash 
for a chemistry text and a 
pitcher of beer. Cash Pawn 
oVGun, Inc., 

1917 Ft, Riley Boulevard. 

HEALTH AND Aulo 
Insurance. Call us be- 
fore buying the University 
Health Plan. 

Multi- line Agency. 555 
Poynti Suite 

215 Tim Engle 537-4661 



LMIIMKV 



Testing Center 

539-5338 







k Ml tit! 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



'S.illH. d,t\ it-lill' 



I iv.ikil .ia«>v. from 
i unpih in 





DEPENDABLE. NON- 
SMOKER needed to 
care for five year old after 
kindergarten, 
and eight year old after 
school In my 

home,, located near 
Amanda Arnold. Must 
have child care experience 
and own trans- 
portation. References 
required. Hours will 
be 1 1:20a, m- 5:30p.m., 
Monday- Friday. 

Please call 537-7354 after 
5:30p.m. for 

more information. 



The CoAsgaan cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of adver- 
tisements In the 
Employment 
classification. Readers 
era advised to ap- 
proach any such 
employment 
opportunity 



The Collegian 

urges our readers to 
contact the Better 
Business Bureau, $01 
SE Jefferson, Top* 
ha, KS 66007-1190. 
(913)233-0454. 

ADMINISTRATIVE 
ASSISTANT with execu- 
tive secretary 

responsibilities. Full-time. 
Typing proficiency, 
Macintosh computer 
proficiency required Apply 

in person 

with resume. Sager Den- 
tal Associates PA St 4 
Humboldt. 

BABYSITTER NEEDED 
for two children in mf 
home. Prefer live-in. Must 



have time avail- 
able from 6a. m to 7:45a.m. 
and 3p.m. to 

6p.m. Monday- Friday. 
Some nights and 
weekends needed. Prefer 
college girl with 
rural background. Must 
be absolutely de- 
pendable! Need reliable 
transportation, ex- 
cellent driving record, non- 
smoker. Must 
enjoy children and have 
previous experi- 
ence. References required. 
Cell 776-0140 
before 9p.m. and leave 
message. 

CHILDCARE 
PROVIDER/ teacher aide 
f o r 

weekday church program 
involving inf- 

ants through preschool - 
age children. 

Must be available 8:30 to 
noon on Thurs- 
day mornings. Potential 
for additional 

hours. Childcare 

experience and refer- 
ences required. Apply by 
August 31 at 

the First United Methodist 
Church. 6th 

and Poyntt. 

HAVE FUN earning 
$500- $1,500 in one 
weak! Student 

organizations needed for 
marketing project 

on-campus. Must be 
motivated and organized. 
Call Melanie 

at 1800)692-221 ext. 123. 

HELP WANTED: 
Student office assistant 
f o r 

ten hours per week, 
morning and after- 
noon hours needed. Prefer 
work,' study. 

Qualifications: knowledge 
of word pro- 

cessing and spreadsheet 
applications 
preferred. Contact Helton 
Hall Business 

Office, Holton Hall. Room 
7A or phone 

532-6491. 

HELP WANTED: 
Translators for French, 
G e r 

man, Spanish, Chinese. 
Must be here until 
February 1, 1993. Call Pam 
Fulmer at the 

International Trade 
Institute, 5326799 for 
interview. 

HOUSE HELPER 
needed for single mom 
four- 
five hours a week for 
laundry. cleaning, 
and errands. Salary and 
hours negotiable. 
Must be absolutely reliable. 
Must have 

laundry and cleaning 
experience. Prefer 
college girl with rural 
background. Refer- 
ences required. Call 7 76 
0140 before 

9p.m. and leave message. 

LEAD TEACHER for 
nationally accredited 
early childhood program. 
the successful 

candidate will have a four 
year degree in 
the educational field 
preferably early 

childhood education. 
Individuals must 

have experience teaching 



young child- 

ren in group situations. 
Please send re- 
sume with cover letter, 
college tran- 

scripts and three names of 
references to 

Marsha Tannehill, Seven 
Dolors Child 

care/ Preschool, 220 S 
Juliette by 

Sept. 1. 

LIFEGUARDS AND 
Swim Instructors: You 
need a job— we need you I 
Must have 

current CPfV First Aid and 
WSI certifi- 

cation. Contact LJFM at 
539-6763 or stop 
by 1221 Thurston for an 
application. 
EOE. 



LOOKING 

advertising, 
r e I a t i o 
or business 
interested in 



FOR 
public 
n s , 
major 
being 



classified student 
advertising manager 
for the Kansas State 
Collegian adver- 

tising department. Must 
have a flexible 
schedule, be able to work 
et least 3- 4 
hours per day, and have 
excellent tele- 

phone skills. For 
applications and further 
information contact 
Annette or Gloria at 
532-6560 

NATIONAL 
PUBLISHING company is 
seek 
ing marketing personnel to 
work with pro- 
fessors and course 
instructors at Kan- 
sas State University. 
Position will re- 
quire 2- 3 hours per day 
Must have 

strong customer support 
end interna- 

tional skills. Base pay and 
training are 

provided Please send your 
resume to. 

CAP, P O. Box 26340. 
Oklahoma City, 

OK 73126. 

OFFICE ASSISTANT, 
must be flexible, have 
a pleasing personality 

when dealing with 
the public and have some 
experience 
with small office 
procedures and com- 
puters. Apply at Seven 
Dolors Childcare/ 
Pre -school. 220 S, Juliette. 
through Aug. 

26, EOE 

PART- TIME 

Programmer/ Clerical help 
want- 
ed 115- 20 hours/ week, 
$4.55- $4 .75/ hour 
depending on experience). 
60 percent of 

duties will be 

programming: Writing/ 
m a i n 
laining PC- based 
programs and main- 
tenance of PC systems 
including installa- 
tion,' updating commercial 
software, 40 

percent of duties will be 
clerical: Data en- 
try, operation of optical 
scanner and print- 
er, filing orders, word 
processing (Word- 
Perfect I. typing, proofing, 
and some heavy 



lifting. Important: 
Applicants must be able 
to work full-time during 

all schooi breaks. 
including summer. Work 
Study preferred 

but not required. 
Applications available 
from the Center for Faculty 
Evaluation & 

Development, College 
Court Building, 

room 161. 

POSITION AVAILABLE 
immediately at Shop 
Quit Midnight shift $4.50/ 
hour, 4- mid- 

night or 3- 1 1 shift $4 25/ 
hour part-time, 

2- 3 nights to start Register 
experience 
preferred Apply in person 
1115 West- 

port. Suite B 

PRESCHOOL 
TEACHER'S assistant 
needed 
Tuesday and Thursday 
mornings. 537- 

8180. 

RILEY COUNTY 
Extension Assistant to con- 
duct a youth alcohol abuse 
education pro- 

gram during after school 
hours. Position is 
available September 1992- 
May. 1993, 

and involves 150 hours 
per semester at $5 
per hour Some work 
hours may be flexi- 
ble, but applicant must be 
available Mon- 

day- Thursday afternoons. 
At minimum, 

position requires a high 
school diploma or 
equivalent, two years 
working experience, 
desire and ability to work 
with youth. good 
verbal and written 
communication skills. 
and organizational skills. 
Applicant must 

have own transportation, 
mileage will be 
reimbursed. Training and 
supervision will 

be provided. Complete 
written application 
and submit with three 
references to Riley 
County Extension Office, 
110 Courthouse 

Plaza, Manhattan, KS by 
August 26, 1992 
Funding in part provided 
by the City of 
Manhattan. EOE. 

VISTA DRIVE- IN is now 
taking applications 
for full and part-time help 
Apply in per- 

son at 1911 Tuttle Creek 
Blvd. 



330 



$200- $500 weekly 
Assemble products at 
home. Easy! No selling. 
You're paid di- 
rect. Fully guaranteed 
Free informa- 

tion — 24 hour hotline, 
8013792900 
Copyright (KS13KDH 

The Coaaoian cannot 
verify the financial po 
tenttal of 

advertisements in the 
Employment 
classification. Readers 
era advised to ip 



Classified Directory 




BULLETIN 

BOARD 






HOUSING 
HEAL ESTATE 



ForletM-Apt 
F watered. FO 

Rent-Apt 



SERVICE 
DIRECTOR* 



EMPLOYMENT ■ ■ OPEN 
CAREERS I MARKET 



TRANS 
PORTATlON 



Ttaml 
TypetOaeJa* 



Parties 



Rooea Ay efebe. 
for Rem — 
Housta, For SMt 
- - HduaH fa 



Semne/AJtarsfcrti 

Stagnancy wssng. 
Lawn Cars. Ches 
Can, 

Mmwara.'DJt Pei 



raWJ) TVsaTqpa, 

vounswn 
Neeced, SU*r*tt 



fori 



W»-*CtoBu,. 

hems tar Sate 
Funrtuajp 
Suy.'Sel 

Qaraea^ranfSefcs, 
Aueton.Aroqusi, 
Computers, Food 
SOacaa Musk 
.Pes 



akwreydat. Car 



TRAVEL 
TRIPS 



Tow Packages. 
Arppna TkMP, 
TranTtka*, Bus 
Tie**** 



ForRaal- 
Gerage, 



lotSs* 



CATEGORIES 

To heap you find what you are 
tooka-ig for, the classified ads 
have been arranged by category 
and sub- category All categories 
are marked by one of the large 
•mages, and sub-categories are 
preceded by a number 
design* son 



proach any such 
employment 
opportunity 



The Collegian 

urges our readers to 
contact the Better 
Business Bureau, 901 
SE Jefferson, Tope- 
ka. KS 66907-1190 
1913)232-0454, 

ALASKA SUMMER 
employment — fisheries 
Earn $5,000 plus/ month. 
Free transpor- 

tation! Room and board! 
Over 8.000 

openings. No experience 
necessary. 
Male or female. For 
employment program 
call Student Employment 
Services at 1- 

206-545 4155 ext. A5768. 

POST ADVERTISING 

materials on campus. 
Write: College Distributors. 
33 Pebble- 

wood Trail, Nsperville, 
Illinois 60563. 



WOW RAISE 5500)000 
IN JUST ONE WEEK' 



For your frai. 
sorority, club, clc. 

Assist Marketing Firm 

running fun event on 

campus tor Fortune 

SOU Companies. 

FREE 

HEADPHONE RADIO 

jual for calling 

l-SOO-9S<M0J7,e.«.25 



OPEN 
MARKET 




AGGIE'S NEW TO YOU 
Second Hand Store 

537-6803 

e»4***i*-ra* TtassM 



415 



Fe#fMlaBT*J If 

■taylsi 



FOR SALE full sue rwOe- 
a-bed. Dark brown. 
539-7868. leave massage. 

FOR SALE: Table lamp 
five-shelf bookcase, 
Club choir, swivel rocker, 
bedroom chair. 

block fireplece tools, 
Franklin fireplace- 
uses wood or gas, *T7 piece 
dishes. 457 

3722 

MUST SELL matching 
couch and chair, in 
vary good condition, $180. 
776-3668. 

TWIN BED for sale. 
Complete. $7S or best off- 
er. Call 7795682 and leave 

message. 

TWO KING- sua 
waterbeda, $76 each. 

Small dormitory 

refrigerator, $65 or bast 
offer Schwinn Impact Pro. 
21 inches, 

$400, 539-8762 

WOHLERS USED 
Furniture. 615 North 3rd, 
639-3119 Open 10a.m.- 
6p.m. Monday- 

Friday; until 8pm 




DRAFTING 
EOUIPMENT for sale. For 
more In- 

formation call Angela 779 
2447 

FOUR CUBIC foot 

refrigerator for sale. Ex- 
cellent condition. $30. Call 
7794266. 

ROLLAWAY BEO 
(single); sire 12 clothing; 
siie 12 square dance 
dresses 537 -0231 

after 1:30p.m. 



Thursdays; Saturday- 
Sunday 1- 5p.m. 




AT&T PC 6300 
computer, IBM compatible. 
30mb hard disk, 3.5' & 
5 25" disk drives, 
color monitor, $290. Cell 
539-7956 




INTERESTED IN 
owning a pet, but cats and 
dogs aren't allowed? Get 
a rabbit, they 

are a great substitute. Call 
539-7128. 

SAVE $86 on a 55- 

gallon aquarium w/ hood 
and fluorescent lights. 
Complete set up for 
$269.99 Pets-n-Stuff, 1106 
Waters. 539 

9494. 



455 



SOLOFLEX 

COMPLETE, Lifce new $750, 
537-7675 lafter 6:30pm i 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 




197B IMPALA 350 
transmission. Best offer. 
Call 5392463 before 11am. 
or after 

6p.m. 

CHEAPl FBVU.S sern-d 
1989 Mercedes 

$200. 1986 VW $50, 1987 
Mercedes 
$100, 1965 Mustang $50. 
Choose from 

thousands starting S25. 
Free information 

24 hour hotline (801)379- 
2929. Copy- 

right number KS13KJC. 




12- SPEED Elite tour 
bicycle- new- $125 or 
best offer. (913)785-2604 

1990 TREK 1100 58 cm 
Shimano 106. Call 
7797091 




1990 HONDA CBR 600, 
excellent condition, 
$2950. 537 9674. 

1992 ZX7 Ninja. 
Showroom condition 
match- 
ing cover, helmet, 700* 
miles. under war- 
ranty. $6500. Days 
539-1926. evenings 
537-0343 ask for Brirt. 

TWO 20- inch ten- 
speed bicycie* Good Con- 
dition $50 each. 5395078 
after 7p.m. 



GET 

THE 

WORD 

OUT 



n 



OUIOWOJUSRDS 






I fl Augurt 24, f — 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






I 



i 



; 



POLICE 



Alcohol offenses 
increase with 
students' arrival 



■V TH1 CPU WnUM CTAFF 

Students arrive in the fall, and 
the police get busy. 

The number of incidents of 
driving while under the influence, 
minors in possession of alcohol, 
and assaults in Riley County 
increase when students return to 
campus, compared to the summer 
months. 

"It may be the simple fact of per 
capita," K-State Investigator 
Richard Herrman said. "There are 
more people here during August 
through May than during May 
through August." 

According to K-State Police 
Department keyboard operator 
Annette Boddy, 10 DUI's occurred 
from August 1991 to May 1992, 
compared to only four during the 
summer. Seven minors in 
possession occurred during the year 
and one during the summer, and 35 
assaults during the year compared 
to five during the summer. 

"When you crowd 20,000 people 
into a community, there are more 
people having more accidents and 



more people drinking and taking 
advantage of the bars," Herrman 
said. "It's sheer numbers. It takes a 
party here, a party there, and people 
say 'Oh. the students have broken 
loose.' " 

Even though there is a larger 
number of people inhabiting Riley 
County during the school year, K- 
State students aren't the only factor 
in the increase in the numbers of 
reported incidents. 

According to the Riley County 
Police Department, students aren't 
the only ones involved. The largest 
group is in their late teens and early 
20s and is statistically anticipated to 
be the largest group of offenders 
and victims. 

Herrman said he agreed that 
students aren't the only offenders. 

"Local kids want to get into the 
action," Herrman said. The single 
military sect also wants to pick up 
on the action." 

To help lower the numbers, 
Herrman said he feels that local 
businesses, especially the ones 
catering to the drinking students, 
need to be more cautious. 



The quarterback question 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 

have managed to claim since 1970. 
And the six-game home winning 
streak is unmatched for 69 years. 

But this is 1992. 

Snyder and the Cats are only 
looking ahead. According to 
Snyder, dwelling on the past can 
only nun the future. 

"When you start to believe all 
the hype," he said, "the boat starts 
going backward, and it's hard to get 
the brakes put on." 

But before the Cats can punch 
the accelerator, some questions 
need to be addressed. 

First and foremost is the 
question that seems to be a staple in 
the Bill Snyder era. Who is going to 
throw the football? 

This year's controversy 
revolves around junior Jason 
Smargiasso, who was beat out a 
year ago by Paul Watson in a 
similar situation, and senior Matt 
Garber, who did not throw a pass in 
the 1991 campaign. 

But Garber and Smargiasso 
agreed that this year's quarterback 
battle is different. 

"It's not a dog-eat-dog 
situation," Smargiasso said "I like 
Matt a lot, and we help each other 
all the time. It's a good situation." 

And a situation that Snyder 
hasn't yet made a decision about. 

"We just want to get the very 
best player on the field as quickly 
as we can." he said. "We'll make 
that decision when it's evident." 

The void left by injured 1,000- 
yard rusher Eric Gallon is another 
situation staring Snyder in the face. 

But preliminary looks at 
sophomores J.J. Smith and Leon 
Edwards and freshman Bryant 
Brooks have alleviated some early 
fears. 

"We were awfully pleased with 
Smith, Edwards and Brooks," 
Snyder said. "I feel pretty 
comfortable about that situation." 

Nevertheless, the question 
remains. 

"Eric is doing very, very well," 
Snyder said. "He's making 
consistent progress. But the 
prognosis is day -to-day. I can't put 
a return day on htm." 



And finally, the Wildcats have to 
replace the receiving trio of 
Michael Smith, Frank Hernandez 
and Russ Campbell. When these 
Wildcat legends graduated in May, 
they look with them a combined 
total of 1 .594 receiving yards. 

But Snyder said what the new 
receiving corps lacks in experience, 
they may well make up for in talent. 

Both senior Gerald Benton and 
junior Andre Coleman have speed 
and agility. Sophomore tight end 
Brian Rees has both the size — 245 
pounds — and the soft hands that 
made Campbell such a great 
receiver. 

"They have ability," Snyder 
said. "They haven't been on the 
field as much, but they're far 
quicker this year than ever before. I 
was really pleased with their 
progress this spring." 

The Wildcat defense, which a 
year ago became only the second 
team in the last three seasons to 
hold the Colorado Buffaloes to 10 
points or less, has become one of 
the most feared in the Big Eight. 

The 1991 Cat defense allowed 
its fewest yards and points in nine 
seasons. The team allowed just 1 7.3 
points per game in Big Eight play. 

And considering eight starters 
from last year's squad will return 
for the 1992 campaign, this year's 
team promises to be even better. 

The progress of the Wildcats, 
who just four yean ago were 0-11, 
has not gone unnoticed. 

For the first time since 1982, the 
Cats will get national exposure via 
a Nov. 5 ESPN game at home. A 
record five games will be televised 
during the season. 

"1 appreciate that, and I'm 
pleased for the players," Snyder 
said. "It shows that there is some 
respect for what these players have 
done in the last four years." 

That progress, however, has only 
begun, as visions of postseason play 
dance in the Wildcat helmets. 

"If we are home for Christmas," 
Smargiasso said, "it will be a big 
disappointment." 

The quest for a bowl bid begins 
with a home game Sept. 19 against 
Montana. 




McCain Tickets 

Become an usher at McCain Auditorium. 
In return for your time we will give you 
free tickets to the exciting events 
scheduled in the McCain Performance 
Series. 

Join us at an orientation meeting in the 
McCain Lobby on Tuesday, August 25 
at 4:30 p.m. 

If you are unable to attend, 
call 532-7026 for details. 



Johnson resigns as biology division director 



University splits 

administrative tasks 
in restructuring 



L'ollcfiin 

After IS years as Division of 
Biology director. Terry Johnson has 
resigned. However, he is not 
leaving K-State or many of the 
department's programs, and he's 
not even leaving his office. 

Johnson said a mixture of 
personal and professional reasons 
was why he decided to step aside as 
director. 

"In the 15 years I've been here, 
the job has grown enormously 
complex. We've continued to add 
large global programs, and it's very 



hard to handle them all," Johnson 
said. 

The University has decided to 
split some of the administrative 
tasks and restructure the division. 
Johnson will continue to oversee 
the University's Center of Basic 
Cancer Research, the National 
Aeronautical Space Administration- 
funded BioServe Space 
Technologies, work on his own 
research and teach. 

Professor Jerry We is will be 
interim director and will handle the 
faculty, hiring, rooms and facilities 
along with many other duties. We is 
said he will be responsible for 
charting the course for division's 
future. 

Weis has been in the biology 
department for more than 25 years. 



He said it has experienced a lot of 
change with all the added programs. 

"I've seen this place grow. When 
I came here, the department didn't 
really exist, and 
today ii is a very 
exciting place to i 
be," Weis said. 

Johnson said 
the best thing 
about the new I 
position is that 
he will have 
time to focus on 
several issues he 
was unable to 
concentrate on Johnson 
in the past. 

"The most positive thing is that I 
can get involved with my own 
scientific career and my own 




research. I'll also have the time to 
spend m new ideas for the cancer 
center and the space center," 
Johnson said. "I'll be able to be 
focused without being pulled in so 
many directions." 

In recent years, Johnson has 
received support of more than $6 
million from the National Cancer 
Institute. American Cancer Society, 
the Office of Naval Research. 
NASA and the Wesley Foundation. 

Not only has Johnson raised 
money for cancer research, he has 
done a lot of his own research. He 
helped originate the coloring book 
"Dr. Waddle," which explains 
cancer to children. He has been 
honored for outstanding teaching 
capability and was named 
distinguished professor in 1989. 



McCain Auditorium- KSU 

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i AJtaKnli.. K^diriJ.C-rOUTf.Hw. (XHin) )»1 



The Delta Chi Fraternity 

is coming to 

Kansas State University 

Accept the Challenge of Starting Your Own Fraternity 




Delta Chi representatives will be on campus starting 
September 21,1 992. For more information about 
becoming a Founding Father, contact: 
Steve Bossan at (319) 337-481 1 or Barb Robe I 
Coordinator for Greek Affairs, at 532-5546. 

"Destiny is not a matter of chance. It is a matter of choice!" 
- William Jennings Bryan, Delta Cht 



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KANSAS STATE 




WELCOME BACK 




tt nrw front 



MOBS 




AUGUST 25, 1992 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99, NUMBER 2 



I 



K-State police officer arraigned 



"He's never 



Involved In 
any criminal 
activity of 
any kind. He 
nee been a 
member of 
law 

enforcement 
for over 25 
years." 

JOSEPH KNOPP, 

WOODRUFFS 

ATTORNEY 




DAVID Hum Coitegiar 



Harry Woodruff waits to board a van to the Riley County Jail after his arraignment Monday in District Court. 



Bond set at $7,500 for man charged 
with 4 counts of taking indecent liberties 



FUQUA 



Collet nn 

He sat quietly in the courtroom, 
speaking only to his attorney. 
Harry Woodruff was dressed in the 
orange jumpsuit of prisoners, and 
his feet were shackled as he waited 
for the judge. 

Woodruff, 47, has been a police 
officer for more than 20 years, hut 
he experienced the other side of the 



law Monday when he was 
arraigned in Riley County District 
Court. 

The suspended K State officer 
was charged Saturday with four 
counts of taking indecent liberties 
with a child. Bond was originally 
set at $7,500. but today District 
Judge Harlan Graham allowed 
Woodruff to pay part of it and have 
someone cosign for the rest. 



Joseph Knopp, Woodruff's 
attorney, asked for the bond 
modification. 

"The circumstances are subject 
to interpretation," Knopp said. 
"Mr. Woodruff has plans to reside 
with relatives. He has no assets to 
pledge. Without the ability to 
work, he is unable to post bond." 

Knopp told the judge Woodruff 
had no prior record and cited 
Woodruff's years as a police 
officer as an example of character. 

"He's never been involved in 
any criminal activity of any kind." 



Knopp said. "He has been a 
member of taw enforcement for 
over 25 years." 

County Attorney Bill Kennedy 
asked the judge to keep Woodruff 
from going near his former 
residence if he were released. 

"He should stay away from his 
former residence except when 
escorted by a police officer to get 
clothes and such," Kennedy said. 

Graham modified the bail- 
payment process, but not the 

■ See OFFICER page 10 



CRIME 



Student 
drug use 
decreasing 

TADMfSKLWHITl ( 

Collegian 

Drug use has steadily decreased throughout 
K-State since the late 1970s, according to Bill 
Arck, director of the Alcohol and other Drug 
Education Service, 

Arck said his office conducts large surveys of 
students, quantifying all types of drug use. every 
other year. 

There has seemed to be no drastic increase in 
the use of any drug. Arck said. The trend of 
alcohol use has remained consistent, around 93- 
94 percent of surveyed students. 

He said he believes cocaine use has been 
decreasing, while LSD has made somewhat of a 
comeback, based on his studies. 

"Overall-drug usage peaked in 1978-79 and 
has been steadily decreasing since then, but the 
amount of other drugs which students are willing 
to admit to is very small," he said. 

In a 1984 survey, Arck noted that 15 percent 
of the students had used marijuana within the 
last month, compared to nine percent in 1987 
and 5.5 percent in 1989. 

Arck said the decrease in illegal drugs is due 
to a combination of things. 

"Laws have gotten tougher, and the majority 
of society has agreed that drugs are wrong," he 
said. 

The use of alcohol has remained steady, but 
the number of deaths as a result of driving under 
the influence has dropped more than 50 percent 

■ See DRUGS page 10 



ACADEMICS 



Landscape 
architecture 
stays on top 



Cotlcfiui 

K-State recently secured its position as the 
most award-winning university in student 
landscape-architecture design. 

Five landscape-architecture students won four 
commendations in the annual American Society 
of Landscape Architects' student design 
competition. 

With four commendations among only 11 
awards given this year, K-State holds its rank as 
first in the nation in total awards. They go to 50 
programs that are eligible to compete each year. 

K-State's program has more than three times 
the number of awards given to its closest 
competitor, and it ranks above such universities 
as Harvard, Ball State and Cornell. 

"We lead the country in student design 
■ See STUDENTS page 10 



NEWS DIGEST 



► BRAZILIAN GOVERNMENT PROBED 



BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — 
Congress accused President 
Fernando Collor de Mello on 
Monday of running a corrupted 
government, increasing calls 
for the impeachment of Brazil's 
first directly elected leader after 



decades of military rule. 

The two-month probe 
revealed the inner workings of 
an 'industry of influence 
trafficking" that it said Collor 
should have known about 
■ See related story page 5 



► WEST AWAITS OK FOR AIR ZONE 



MANAMA, Bahrain (AP) — 
The Western allies await 
Bahrain and Saudi Arabia's 
approval to send in warplanes 
that would shoot down Iraqi 
planes violating a no-fly zone 
over southern Iraq, diplomats 
said Monday. 

The zone would cover the 



southern third of Iraq, including 
marshlands sheltering Shiite 
Muslims who fled after 
Saddam Hussein's forces 
crushed their rebellion in the 
wake of the Gulf War. 

An announcement from the 
White House is expected 
today. 



►U.N. KEPT OUT OF SERB CAMP 



SARAJEVO. Bosnia- 
Herzegovina (AP) — A U.N. 
team investigating alleged 
atrocities of the Bosnian war 
was refused entry into a prison 
camp. Former Polish Premier 
Tadeusz Mazowiecki, the 
mission's leader, accused the 



Serbs Monday ot covering up 
conditions inside the Manjaca 
camp at Banja Luka. about 1 00 
miles to the northwest. 

Serb fighters reportedly hold 
about 7.500 people in camps; 
Croats and Muslims fewer than 
2,000 



HURRICANE ANDREW 






Gulf coast prepares for worst 



*MOCWTO 

NEW ORLEANS — Residents 
from Texas to Alabama prepared 
Monday for a potentially 
catastrophic visit from Hurricane 
Andrew after the deadly storm 
swept across southern Florida and 
into the Gulf of Mexico. 

More than 1.5 million people 
living near the coast in Louisiana 
were asked — or told — to leave. 

The storm's next rendezvous 
with land was uncertain, but 
forecasters said it would probably 
be around New Orleans by early 
Wednesday. 

Coastal residents, some 
burdened with the memories of past 
killer storms, loaded up on 
plywood, batteries, flashlights, 
bottled water and other supplies. 
Others flocked to inland hotels. 

Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards 
urged coastal residents to leave 
Monday to avoid a rush. Oil 
companies evacuated hundreds of 
workers from platforms in the gulf. 

The mandatory, or voluntary, 
evacuation of more than 1 .5 million 
people in 1 1 Louisiana parishes, 
including 200.000 in New Orleans, 
was ordered late Monday, said Brett 



Krieger. a state emergency official. 
Response was slow, he said. 

The National Weather Service 
issued a hurricane warning for a 
290-mile stretch of coast from 
Pascagoula, Miss., to Vermillion 
Bay. La. 

In Mississippi, casino boats in 
Gulfport headed inland on an 
industrial waterway, and two 
legislative run-off elections 
scheduled for Tuesday were 
postponed. 

Coastal area schools in 
Mississippi were ordered closed, 
and residents of tow-lying areas 
were told to evacuate. 

If the hurricane combines with 
the remnants of Tropica) Storm 
Lester, moving in from the Pacific, 
there is also the possibility of 
serious flooding in the Midwest, 
meteorologists said. 

"At this point, all we can do is 
monitor the storm," Edwards said. 
"If it hits, there's a possibility it 
will be one of the worsi in recent 
times." 

New Orleans sits on a saucer- 
shaped flood plain guarded by a 
complicated levee system, and 
workers were closing 1 1 1 flood 



THE WRATH 
OF ANDREW 

Hurricane Andrew ripped 
through southern Florida 
early Monday morning, 

causing at least 10 . 

deaths. Winds were Iverjr building 
clocked at more Homeat 
than 160 mph. 



PATH OF 
STORM 





gates designed to guard the area 
from floods. However, computer 
studies, validated by past 
hurricanes, show a storm like 
Andrew would bring widespread 
flooding throughout the New 
Orleans area, said Ronnie Jones, a 
state police spokesman. 



The area has only two major 
roads out, both inters! ales, and state 
police estimate a total evacuation 
would take at least 60 hours. 

"We already are likely past that 
window of opportunity," Jones said. 



I 



f 



'4 



2 August 25, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



L 



FYI 



Change classes 
with drop/add 




KATIE WALKER 



Friday Is 
the last 
day to add 
a class 
without 
instructor 
permis- 
sion. 

Sept. 28 
Is the last 
day to 
drop with- 
out a "W." 



Collegia) 

Students who arc trying to get into a class or are 
just having second thoughts about one they are 
enrolled in must go through drop/add procedures to 
change their schedules. 

Appointment cards are needed for drop/add 
through Thursday. 

"All our appointment cards were handed out last 
Friday," said Gunile DeVault. associate registrar. 
"Students who got one can come on or after the time 
on their card," she said. 

Starting Friday, drop/add is first come, first 
served. No appointment cards arc needed. 

Drop/add forms are available at the enrollment 
center, deans' offices and the registrar's office and 
must be brought to Willard 217. 

After Friday, instructor permission is needed to 
add any class. This week, permission is also needed 
in two instances. 

"If the class is closed, the students need a class 
permit form, which they gel from the instructor," 
Dc Vault said. "Also, they need permission if the 
line schedule says that permission is required." 

There is no deadline to add a class, although the 
list of signatures needed on the form grows the 
longer students wait to make the change, DeVault 
said. 

Also, there is no fee to drop/add. 

Friday is the last day to add a class without the 
instructor's permission. Sept. 28 is the last day to 
drop a full-semester class without having a "W" 
recorded on transcripts. 

The "W" shows that a student withdrew from a 
class four weeks into the semester, DeVault said. 

Sabrina Mercer, junior in architectural 
engineering, said she dislikes the time it takes to get 
through the long lines and offered some advice. 

"Choose your classes wisely the first time," 
Mercer said. 






POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 



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cubtfrt by StuO>ni PuMcuLar-.i rnc KMit Kan 1 03 Mwriinan, Kan 6650* The &)!■ >■" i 
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poauga it pan at Mannanan Kan 8650? 

POSTMASTER Sana aao^Ki ciwioai to Kama* Su*» Coaaojar Onuaaon daaK Kaana i W 
Manhattan Kan «6506-7U7 

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kiguinat concammg meal national and daavAad Mo 1 *? aesanaing mould ba avaaafl to |»1 3) 
■MM 



POLICE REPORTS 



K-STATE POLICE 



CAMPUS BULLETIN 



These reports are taken directly from the daily tog of ihe KSU Police 
Department. Because of incomplete information in Ihe log. not all campus 
crimes arc listed here. 
SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 

At 11:00 p.m., a 1907 Buick At 11:32 p.m., the thefl of a 

Century with license plate No. DNC television In Haymaker Hall was 
652 wm reported diMbied until noon reported. Loss was $250. 
Monday In lot D-tE. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 24 



At 9:03 a.m., a vehicle accident 
occurred on the drive between lots B 
3 and B-16, Loss was more than $500. 

RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



At 9:45 a.m., a vehicle accident 
occurred in lot B-16. Loss was more 
then $500. 



in 



These reports arc taken directly from the daily log of the Riley County 
Police Department. Because of space constraints, not all crimes appearing 
in the log are published. 



SUNDAY. AUGUST 23 



m 



m 



At 7:45 p.m., Timothy f. Stegeman, 
2104 Blakar Drive, was arrested tor 
child abuse. He was released on 
$1,000 bond. 

At 9:15 p.m., Dana Wethlngton, 



2021 College View Road, reported a 
past burglary. A cushion on a chaise 
lounge and a window screen were 
damaged Loss was $05. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 24 



At 12:45 a.m., Joey J. Blackburn, 
1207 Colorado St., was arrested for 
DU). He was released on $1,000 bond. 

At 6:29 a.m., a deceased opossum 
was reported in the 2600 block ot 
Kimball Ave. It was taken to tha 
landfill. 

At 11:10 a.m., Jamas A. 



Armstrong, 417 Moro St., was 
arrested for criminal trespassing at 
Manhattan Town Center. He was 
confined in lieu of $500 bond. 

At 12:33 p.m., Jeson Blackburn, 
3300 Shady Vale Drive, reported $300 
damage to the windshield of hia 
vehicle. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 29 MtsMsMHsMMH 

■ Mortar Board will meet at 6 p.m. in Union 206. 

■ The Union's sen/ice fair will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the 
Courtyard. 

■ Anyone interested in the K-State Water Ski Team should 
contact Casey Koehler at 776-5260 before the informational 
meeting Thursday. 

■ Society for Creative Anachronism will meet at 7 p.m . on the 
east side of City Park. 

■ All University Homecoming Committee will meet at 3:30 p.m 
Union 209, 

■ "Preparing for the Law School Admission Test" will be at 1 :30 
p.m. in Union 204. This is essential for 1992-93 test-takers. 

■ "Law School Deadlines and Application Information" will be 
from 3 to 5 p.m. in Union 205. 

■ Freshmen and new students in the College of Education will 
meet at 7 p.m. in Burt Hall 1 01 . 

■ "Using Library Resources" demonstrations will be from 1 1 a.m. 
to t p.m. on the Union main floor by the Wildcat Card window. 

■ "There's More to K- State Than Books" will be from 4 to 5 p.m. 
in Derby 1 34. The presentation will explain student activities and 
organizations. 

■ "Building Bridges" will be from 6 to 7 p.m. in Derby 134 to 
discuss the importance of culture and diversity. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 •*MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMH 

■ Computing and Network Services will sponsor a free lecture on 
using the CMS operating system on the University mainframe from 
2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Cardwell 102. 

■ "Law School Deaditnes and Application Information" will be 
from 9:30 to 1 1 :45 a.m. in Union 204. 



» 



WEATHER 



J 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 



TODAY'S FORECAST 

H Today partly cloudy. A 50-pefcent chance of thunderstorms. 
High in the upper 80s Southeast winds 10 to 20 mph 
Tonight, showers and thunderstorms likely Low in the lower 
60s Chance for ram, 60 percent 

TOMORROW'S FORECAST 

H Showers and thunderstorms likely Cooler High in the 
upper 70s. Chance for ran, 60 percent. 

EXTENDED FORECAST 

Thursday through Saturday: A chance of showers and 
' thunderstorms Thursday. Cool each day with highs in the 
upper 70s to lower 80s Lows in the mid- 50s to mid-60s 
Wednesday and Thursday, and in the 50s Friday 



GOOOLAND 

57/55 



MANHATTAN 
90/70 m 



TOPEKA 

.90/67 



RUSSELL 

91/70 



NsR 



GARDEN CITY 

m 87/62 



WICHITA 

* 92/67 



KAt 

CfTY 

90/67 



COFFEYV1UE 

.* 87/68 



WORLD TEMPERATURES 




CITY 

Amsterdam 



TEI 
64 '55 



SKY 

rain 



Beirut 



86/75 



dear 



Calgary 



42 31 



Havana 


89/78 


cloudy 


Jerusalem 


82/66 


cloudy 


Singapore 


84/72 


rain 



doudy . Vienna 



82/65 



dear 



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FirstBank Center 



PIZZA SHUTTLE 

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OUTDOOR 



GENERAL AUDITIONS 

All registered KSU students invited 

KSU THEATRE 

AUGUST 24, 25 Callbacks AUG. 26 
NICHOLS HALL LOBBY 7:00 pm for 

THE LADIES OF SHARP END 

THE BEST LITTLE WHOREHOUSE IN TEXAS 

THE FIRST BREEZE OF SUMMER 

OUR COUNTRY'S GOOD 



Reading scripts now available in 129 Nichols Hall 

Numerous male and female roles available 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 532-6875 

For BEST LITTLE WHOREHOUSE: A prepared 
song is fine, but not necessary. Please dress 

for movement auditions. 

MUSICIANS NEEDED: Contact Bill Wingfield 

at 532-5740 

We Encourage Students of All Ethnic 
Backgrounds to Audition for All Roles. 



HEALTH INSURANCE 
RENTER'S INSURANCE 

•Major Medical or Hospital Plans Available 
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INSURECO 537-4414 



WE HAVE MOVED! 

COME SEE US DOWNTOWN 
AT 329 POYNTZ AVENUE 
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LED ZEPPELIN 



THIS THURSDAY 8:00 PM 

TIX: $10 Advance $12 Day Of 

at Box Office & AH Outlets 

Br» ft romp annanwal, Lai. • 3*1 BS» MfK H.ff» ■ lb4|t3tU. l~T OUT* -Una* ,3»l)13-)303 




JOSTEXS 




Tuesday & Wednesday, August 25 & 26 
from 12-5 p.m. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Augustas, 1992 O 

rnT'f ■ iiinl imiiii rim ^3 




Killing Time 



CAWY CONOVCIt Collegian 



PwUr LaGtM, toft, Mntor In architecture and education, sits with friend Matt Reynolds, right, senior In speech, Monday afternoon In Memorial Stadium. The two were killing tome time on the first day of classes. 



env 



GREEK AFFAIRS 



Pearson selected Sorority rush deemed a success by adviser 

to replace Conduff 
as city manager 



Collefiin 

Manhattan found itself without a 
city manager this summer when 
former City Manager Mike Conduff 
moved to Brian, Texas. 

Assistant City Manager Jim 
Pearson, however, was there to fill 
the gap. 

"I've been assistant city manager 
since 1978." Pearson said. "I've 
worked for three different city 
managers. The governmental body 
felt I was qualified and that my 
experience would be beneficial. " 

The Manhattan City 
Commission did not conduct a 
national search or advertise 
nationally for the position, Pearson 
said, because the commissioners 
decided he was what they were 
looking for. 

"In theory, the city manager is 
the chief policy adviser to the city 
commission," Pearson said. "He is 
appointed to the governmental body 
and carries out all the 
administration of the city. 

"The city council has no power 
over any department other than the 
city manager," Pearson said. "I'm 
sort of like a CEO of a 
corporation." 

The city commission will soon 
turn to events affecting K-Staie 
students, Pearson said. 

"One of the big issues is there is 



a movement to change the form of 
government to a representative, 
mayoral government," Pearson 
said. 

Pearson said the movement's 
sponsors think they will have 
enough petitions to put the question 
on the general election ballot. 

Another resurfacing issue is the 
overcrowding of bars, Pearson said. 

"It is a significant concern for 
the city," Pearson said. "The 
occupancy loads are already 
established. That's where the 
conflict comes in. Because those 
occupancy levels are being 
violated." 

Pearson said there needs to be 
stronger enforcement of the laws. 

"If that means the closing of 
establishments that ignore the 
occupancy codes, then OK," 
Pearson said. 

City Commissioner Edith 
Stunkcl said she didn't think the 
city commission had role in 
enforcing the occupancy levels of 
bars. 

"That's not something the 
commission has to deal with," 
Stunkcl said. "That is the 
enforcement of codes that are 
already in place. If it is a danger to 
residents' safety, then the codes 
need to be enforced. I'd just assume 
they would continue the 
enforcement of laws." 



Fewer rush, 

but more pledge 



Colkfivi 

Not as many women went 
through rush week Aug. 12-17, but 
those who did had a better chance 
of getting into a house. 

Rushee numbers were down by 



72 compared to last year, but of the 
472 who rushed, 425 pledged a 
sorority. That 90-percent success 
rate, a 3 -percent increase from last 
year, made the week a success, said 
Greek Affairs Adviser Barb Robel. 

Sororities organize rush week (o 
meet prospective members and to 
let interested women visit K-State s 
greek organizations. 

There are get-acquainted 



activities, meetings and tours of the 
houses. At the end, a computer 
program matches the women to 
houses they prefer. 

"I liked meeting so many 
people." said Kristy Jantz, a 
freshman in fine arts. "But, the 
week was stressful because 1 was 
constantly on the go." she said. 

The last night, rushees submitted 
their top three choices for a house. 



Becca Rademann, freshman in 
milling science, said, "1 felt I was 
making a decision that could really 
affect my college life." 

Both women said they were 
disappointed were not matched with 
one of their top three choices. 

I was not happy at first.' Jantz 
said. However. I have adjusted to 
the situation, and now I'm looking 
forward to the upcoming year." 



Delta Chi fraternity plans colonization in September 



WOAW MUUJKW 

Colttjan 

K- State is getting its first new 
fraternity since 1976, 

National officers for Delta Chi 
fraternity will be on campus Sept. 
2 1 to help colonize the new chapter. 

Greek Affairs Adviser Barb 
Robe) said the campus provides a 
great opportunity for a new chapter. 

"I think K-State traditionally has 
a strong greek system," Robel said. 
"It is a good time to get some new 
blood into the system." 

Delta Chi had a K-State chapter 
from 1965 until interest waned in 
the 1970s, said Scott Leigh, the 



M*U*I 



fraternity's senior leadership 
consultant. 

But some national leaders 
decided to recolonize after 
receiving an invitation from Greek 
Affairs. 

"We feel like K-Statc has a great 
campus for a greek system, and 
we're excited and proud to be a part 
of it," Leigh said. 

The fraternity has mailed an 
informational letter to every 
unaffiliated single male at K-State 
inviting them to pledge, and it 
contacted alumni in the area to 
recruit chapter advisers. Other 
chap ten in the area wit] be invited 



to help with pledging, initiation and 
referrals of eligible men. 

According 
to K-Staie 
policy, a new 
chapter must 
provide 
housing 
within two 
years of col- 
oni zation. 
Leigh said 
hous-edeuiN 
such as 

location will 
be left up to the new members. 

The fraternity plans to pledge 



"I think te- 
state 

traditionally 
has a strong 
greek 
system." 

BARB ROBEL 



about 40 men. Representatives from 
the national headquarters in Iowa 
City. Iowa, will come to interview 
prospective members. They are 
looking for men who are involved 
in campus activities and have at 
least a 2.4 grade point average, but 
Leigh said the most important 
factor is the individual. 

"We're looking for guys who 
will put forth a positive image 
toward campus." Leigh said. 

The fraternity has 125 chapters 
throughout the United States and 
Canada with 65.000 members. 



KAMA) ST ATI 

COLLEGIAN 

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■ 







PINION 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



The opinions aipr eased In 'In Our Opinion* are the opinions of a majority of Editorial 
Board members These views do not necessarily represent the views of Kansas State 
Unrversily, Student Publications Inc or the A.O. UBar School of Journalism and Mass 
Communications. 



Samantha Branson 
EdtotmctM 

Jared Savage 



Erin Petty 
Amy Co* 
Shawn Bruce 
Frank Kfcrmann 
Brian Andenon 



Richards 
lode II Lamer 
David Mayc* 

Derek Thoroan 
Ted I 



Ooajrrm are tw opinion* of 
only the columnist They do not 
reflect ttw views of the Kansas 
State Cotegan. bvl irtslead ofler a 



AUGUST 25, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



In Our Opinion 



By the Collegian Editorial Board 



Some lawmakers doing fine 



THE ISSUE 



feelings toward 



Legislature, 
there are 
legislators who 



recognition. 

WE SUGGEST 

Give the 
legislators a 
break. Soma 
are doing the 
best they can. 

Below are 
the addresses 
of our local 
legislators. 
Give them a 
call or write 
them a tetter, 
and tell them 
your thoughts. 



After years of budget cuts and closed 
classes, some students have deemed the Kansas 
Legislature a boarding house for the world's most 
gruesome villains. 

Some students accuse legislators of sitting in 
Topeka with padlocks on a great cash bin filled to 
the brim. 

Other students say they are angry. 

And they should be. It's their right to be 
angry and to voice their concerns. 

But, oh, how soon they forget to count their 
blessings. 

We cannot assume every legislator within 
the Statehouse walls is a demon lurking about 
waiting to drop the wrecking ball on K-State. 

Be assured, there are some saviors roaming 
the hallowed capitol halls, fighting for K-State 
every step of the way. 

Take local lawmakers. 

This year. Sen. Lana Oleen, R- Manhattan, 
was the co-sponsor of a bill that allowed the 
continuing operation of the Kansas Value Added 
Processing Center in Umberger Hall. 

Oleen and Rep. Sheila Hocbhauser, D 
Manhattan, took a stand and said they would vote 
against any new taxes in Gov. Joan Finney's 1993 



budget proposal that would affect students 
greatly. Some of these proposals included taxing 
home videos, coin -operated laundries and gas. 

And Rep. Kent Glasscock, R-Manhattan. 
stood ready and willing to fight for K-State — as 
did Oleen and Hochhauser — when the 
Legislature was faced with an option to pass a 
budget amendment that would place $18 million 
in windfall funds into the pot for renovation of 
Farrell Library. 

Oleen, Hochhauser and Glasscock — and 
other legislators as well — are committed to the 
causes of K-State and other Kansas Board of 
Regents universities. 

The Value Added Center is here. 

We aren't faced with petty taxes that would 
have taken more money out of our pockets every 
time we rented a video. 

Farrell renovations are $18 million closer to 
becoming a reality. 

Speak out. Unzip your lip. 

Get angry, if need be. Tell the legislators 
exactly what you think. 

But. certainly don't forget to give those who 
deserve it a pat on the back. 



Sen. Lana Oleen 

1619Poyntz 
Manhattan. Kan. 66502 
(913)537-9194 


Rep. Sheila Hochhauser 

104 S. 4th 
P.O. Box 1102 

Manhattan. Kan. 66502 
(913) 776-6006 


Rep. Kent Glasscock 

P.O Box 37 

Manhattan. Kan 66502 
(913) 776-4814 



Readers Write 



b TUITION 



K-State suffers from usual overbudgeting 



Editor, 

If K-Statc students believe 
their fees are high and wish to 
know where some of this money 
— as well as some of their state 
taxes — are going, they might 
like to know that, nationwide, at 
universities like K-State. the 
cost of administration has risen 
from $1 189 per Kit student in 
1980 to $1742 per student in 
1988. This is the latest year for 
which data is available, with 
both figures being in dollars of 
1988 purchasing power. 

I doubt whether K-Statc is 
much different from these 
national figures. 

In this study, these figures 
exclude expenditures for 
libraries, student services such 
as counseling, admissions and 
placement, the physical plant. 



and research. 

This, as well as related 
information, has been given to 
the Collegian staff and has been 
placed on reserve in Farrell 
Library under my name with the 
title "Bloated Administration," 

Leo Schell 
Professor 
Elementary education 



TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR POLICY 

We would like to hear 
what you think Send your 
comments, criticisms and 
complaints to us 

Please include a phone 
number so we can get in 
touch with you m case there 
are questions concerning your 
letter 

Before letters are printed 
m the Collegian, we need to 
see a picture ID Letters 
submitted may be edited tor 
grammar and length 

We cannot guarantee that 
your letter will run. but we wiH 
try to make sure a sampling ot Kedz^HalTT 1 ^ 
both sides ot an issue get into Manhattan. Kan. 6 
the Collegian 




COME BY KEOZtE 1 16 OR SEND 
THEM TO: 

Letters to the Editor 
co Jared Savage 
Kansas State Collegian 



Beware: The GOP is running loose 



Those individuals who watched 
any substantial portion of the 
Republican National Convention 
last week probably remember hearing 
the Republican Party hailed as the 
"Party of Lincoln." 

It may be true that today's GOP was 
founded on the conservative ideals of 
Abraham Lincoln. But what shouldn't 
be forgotten are the contributions of 
20th-century right-wingers that are just 
as much or more a part of what the 
country has become today. 

The two Republicans who can take 
the most credit for the evolution of this 
country into its present state are Joseph 
McCarthy and Richard Nixon. 

Sen. McCarthy, fortunately for 
anyone claiming to be right-wing, 
doesn't get nearly the attention from 
high-school textbooks that a man who 
almost evoked an American fascist 
revolution deserves. 

McCarthy was the chief investigator 
of the House of Representatives Un- 
American Activities Committee in the 
early 1 950s. He is probably most noted 
for his I950 speech in Wheeling. W, 
Va., where he proclaimed to a 
Republican Women's Club that he had 



in his possession an extensive list of 
Communists currently working in the 
U.S. State Department, 

From that point until his political 
demise in 1 954, McCarthy captivated 
the media and 
public by calling 
before his 

committee a 
multitude of 
government 
officials, 
entertainment 
industry 
members, press, 
and private 
citizens whom 
he regarded as 
Communist 
subversives. His 

accusat.ons fcNGLER 
were more often 



than not 

reckless and 

unfounded, ruining the lives of many 

innocent people who came before him. 

More important than his immediate 
victims, though, is the legacy of 
patriotic paranoia he developed and 
nurtured in this country. A Gallup Poll 
taken at the height of McCarthy's reign 




in I954 suggested that 50 percent of 
Americans approved of McCarthy and 
his methods 

Richard Nixon, who was also a 
member of HUAC during the Red Scare 
years as well as a close associate and 
supporter of McCarthy's, exploited this 
paranoia all the way to the presidency 
His staunch anti-communism remains a 
rallying point for the Republican ranks. 

But Nixon is remembered by most 
Americans for something far different 
than being tough on communism: that 
of being a buffoonish liar. 

Nixon's political life was lived under 
the assumption that liberals, both in 
government and media, were out to get 
him — to ruin him and what he stood 
for. Thai paranoia ultimately 
manifested itself in the Watergate 
scandal. McCarthy cultivated the 
noxious seeds of patriotic paranoia that 
would eventually flourish and 
epitomize the Nixon regime. 

Watergate left the public completely 
disenchanted with the political system 
— a state it has often been in since 
Nixon was pardoned by another 
Republican, Gerald Ford. 

Pat Buchanan and George Bush, 
arguably the two loudest GOP voices. 



were respectively a top Nixon speech 
writer/aid and the chairman of the 
Republican National Committee during 
the Watergate scandal. 

Do the Republicans try to remove 
themselves from the crimes of their 
past? Not hardly. A film shown to the 
Republicans in Houston before Bush's 
nomination acceptance speech 
portrayed Nixon in the same positive 
light as Franklin Roosevelt and John F. 
Kennedy. 

The Republican themes brought 
forth at this year's convention once 
again play on the paranoia element of 
American thinking that was revealed 
during the Red Scare. The focus has 
merely shifted. The enemies of America 
are now unwed mothers, rap singers, 
drug users, environmentalists, and 
homosexuals. 

John Adams, the second president of 
the United States, once said. "There 
was never a democracy that didn't 
commit suicide." If Adams's warning 
becomes reality, then it will have been 
the 20th-century conservative 
Republicans who have again armed 
Amenta with the blade of paranoia for 
which to slash its wrists. 



Toles 




Search for 
pleasure must 
have limits 

"While death is all around us. let us nurture pleasure 
— for pleasure is life" — Judith Levin 

The above quote comes from the September/October 
1988 edition of the Utne Reader. It is but a small 
sample of the quile vehement and radical views of 
Judith Levin, concerning the status of morality and sexual 
freedom in the United States. Hers is a position in which 
we find encouragement to embrace immoral sexual 
pleasure, despite the growing threat of the AIDS epidemic. 
Rather than consider the possibility of abstinence or the 
binding "chains" of monogamy, she 
would challenge death for the sake 
of preserving ecstasy through her 
self-styled morality of pleasure 
supreme. 

Levin says it is better to seize 
every opportunity for pleasure than 
to be intimidated by that 
monstrosity known as AIDS. 

It is neither my purpose nor 
desire to argue against sexual 
pleasure. Sexuality and pleasure are 
intrinsically good. Now in saying 
that, I do not condone or endorse 
promiscuity. I believe there are 
moral principles which are 
universal to humanity. So what am 
I? Some sort of moral crusader? 
You bet! I want people to know 
there are options to promiscuity, no matter how it has 
become manifested. A rich diet of sexual experience is not 
the end-all be-all of becoming a complete human being. 

Sexuality is meant for more than one-night stands, the 
cash profits of Playboy, Play girl or any other so-called 
"adult entertainment" entrepreneurs. Sexuality is meant for 
more than prostitution, wet T-shirt contests or even bikini 
contests. (The list goes on.) 

Sexuality is certainly not to die for. But that is what 
Levin and her cohorts would have us believe. They may as 
well just come out and say 'Take a chance, it's worth it." 
Sex today, grave tomorrow. Levin's voice sings out to the 
hapless who would follow her sex ethics, leading them to 
the chopping block of "sexual freedom." 

AIDS, or any other sexually transmitted disease for that 
matter, should not be used as a scare lactic to force 
individuals into celibacy or eternal marriage. These are to 
be sought out in the beginning, so thai we may live free 
from clinics and these diseases. 

1 suppose some will not leam from the harsh lessons 
which others have become subjected to — even to the 
point of death. Perhaps there will be some like Levin, who 
will continue to pursue pleasure as an act of defiance 
against the deadly AIDS virus. If you are one of these, 
who knows? Maybe you will live to tell about it. Then 
again, maybe not. 




SCOTT 

Spradlin 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



1902 



Computer services highlighted in free lectures 



All students, staff and faculty 
can get something for nothing 
beginning Aug. 26. 

Computer and Network Services 
is offering free computing lectures 
to introduce new students and users 
to services provided by the 
KSUVM mainframe computer and 
the operating system of K-State 's 
public Unix quad processor. MATT 
computer. 

All students are also eligible for 
a personal account on the 
mainframe and more information 
during the series in Cardwell Hall 
lecture rooms until Sept. 30. 

Nancy Calhoun, training 
coordinator, said this is the first 
time such a series has been 
conducted for the student body as a 
whole. 

"This is the first time we've 



really addressed the whole 
university community with 
lectures." she said. "We've been 
thinking about doing it for quite a 
while." 

Calhoun said the hour-long 
lectures will cover seven different 
fields including such KSUVM 
topics as Conversational Monitor 
System (CMS), which serves as a 
command interpreter for the 
computer. 

Other KSUVM topics include 
Xedit, which helps the user to add 
or move text and to create files; 
Bitmail electronic mail, which 
sends, receives or prints 
information; and the UNICORN 
campus- wide information system, 
which serves as a "bulletin board" 
for the campus. 

MATT system lecture topics 
include the Unix operating system, 
which serves the same job as the 



CMS; vi editor, which is similar to 
the Xedit on the mainframe; and the 
elm electronic mail, which is also 
the equivalent of the Bitmail 
feature. 

Calhoun said she encourages 
anyone participating in the series to 
purchase the revised "CMS/UNIX 
Survival Kit" which is available at 
the Union Bookstore. Some of the 
manual material may be covered 
more in-depth during the lectures, 
however, purchase of the book is 
not a requirement. 

Lectures will be conducted 
throughout the semester, so walk- 
ins are welcome and pre- 
registration is not required. The 
seminars are lecture only, and 
hands-on training is not provided. 

"I'm interested in the lectures," 
said John Pierce, junior in pre- 
veterinary medicine. "But I only 
use the mainframe for 



communicating with my friends." 
Bill McGuire, senior in electrical 

engineering, said the series would 

be useful. 

"I think it's a good idea because 

people get in with accounts, and 

then don't know what to do," he 

said. 

Depending on the success of the 

upcoming lecture scries and student 

feedback, Calhoun said another 

series could be in the works for the 

spring semester. 



COMPUTING 
LECTURES 

for more tnl<yma6on about the 
frs* computing lectures cal 
Computing and Network Services 
at 532^311 



Canadian shooting spree leaves 2 dead 



ASSOCIATED 



MONTREAL — A professor 
armed with a pistol opened fire at a 
university Monday, killing at least 
two people and wounding three 
before being captured, police and 
witnesses said. 

Some witnesses described the 
gunman as cool and controlled, 
apparently stalking predetermined 
victims and ignoring others in the 



halls of Concordia University. 

"He was in a very, very scary 
mood," said student Rafic 
Chehouri. "He was very calm in 
his walking ... I thought he would 
shoot everyone in front of him, and 
I was in front of him." 

"He was holding the gun in 
front of him, walking like a robot." 
said Chehouri, who took cover in 
an office. 

Unidentified witnesses quoted 



by Canadian Press said the 
assailant was Vatery Fabnkant, a 
professor of mechanical 
engineering. Witnesses were also 
quoted as saying Fabrikant had 
quarrelled with (he administration 
over issues such as being passed 
over for promotion. 

Two Concordia staff members 
were killed, said university 
spokesman Ken Whittingham. But 
he declined to give their names or 



jobs. 

Police spokesman Constable 
Claude Forget said the gunman 
was arrested about an hour after he 
began shooting at the downtown 
campus. Neither police nor the 
university immediately released the 
gunman's name. 

The man took two hostages, but 
was overpowered by one of the 
captives and police moved in, said 
police spokesman Serge Melochc. 



Officials say 

U.S. airlift 

needed 

in Somalia 



MOGADISHU, Somalia — 
Relief officials said Monday a 
planned U.S. airlift was desperately 
needed by Somalia's starving 
people in remote areas of the 
drought-ravaged country. 

But they warned they might not 
be able to protect the food from 
bandits who operate freely during 



Somalia's civil war. 

"We are optimistic, but there's a 
lot of freelance gunmen out there," 
said David Bassiouni, U.N. 
humanitarian coordinator for 
Somalia. "We can only hope for the 
best." 

Bassiouni said a 500-man 
Pakistani army unit would help 
protect food shipments but the 
troops would not amve before mid- 



September. 

He persuaded leaders of warring 
Somali clans to permit the 
Pakistanis to guard Mogadishu, 
Somalia's capital and main port, 
where an uneasy U.N. -mediated 
truce took effect in March. 

Officials said Green Berets of 
the U.S. Army's Special Forces 
would protect three airstrips in 
southern Somalia but only while 



WORLD 



■ 



Brazilian Congress 
calls for ousting 
of president 



Corruption probe 
reveals additional 
details of scandal 



RIO DE JANEIRO. Brazil — 
President Fernando Collor de Mello 
may face impeach mem on charges 
of using his office to "obtain illicit 
profits and benefits." according to 
published excerpts of a 
congressional report. 

The corruption report was 
released Monday in Brasilia, the 
capital, and a request for 
impeachment is being prepared by 
the Brazilian Bar Association. 

"The facts are disgusting. They 
speak for themselves," Sen. Amir 
Lando. the report's author, said 
Sunday. Advance copies were 
published in Sunday newspapers. 

Collor, who denies any 
wrongdoing, is frantically trying to 
marshal enough congressional votes 
to stay in office — even though 
polls show up to 70 percent of 
Brazilians want him gone. 

Collor became Brazil's first 
directly elected leader in three 
decades when he won the 1989 
election on a platform to spur the 



economy and clean up government. 
He now faces monthly inflation of 
more than 20 percent, high 
unemployment and popular unrest. 

The charges stem from evidence 
linking him to the illegal activities 
of Paulo Cesar Farias, his close 
friend and campaign treasurer. 

Congress says Farias, who is 
charged with ^m^gm 

"The facts are 
disgusting. 
They speak 
for 
themselves." 



AMIR LANDO 



extorting 

millions of 

dollars from 

businessmen 

in return for 

promises of 

government 

contracts or 

favored 

treatment, 

used part of the booty to cover 

Collor* s personal expenses. 

Legislators found checks for 
millions of dollars in a bank 
account belonging to Ana Acioli, 
the president's secretary, who pays 
his bills. 

The deposits were made using 
false names and identification 
numbers. Handwriting experts 
determined that most of the checks 
were signed by Farias' secretary. 
Rosinete Melanias. 



U.S. cargo planes are on the 
ground. The strips are in the 
hardest-hit parts of Somalia, where 
relief officials estimate hundreds of 
thousands are just weeks away from 
death. 

Once unloaded, the sacks of 
grain will be the responsibility of 
the U.N. World Food Program, 
which must rely on a ragtag army of 
hired armed guards for security. 



"It's a worrisome situation, all 
right," said Mark Stirling of 
Australia, representative of the U.N. 
Children's Fund, or UNICEF 

Somalia's death toll is estimated 
at about 2,000 people a day, mostly 
children, but relief workers say the> 
cannot estimate accurately since so 
many stricken areas are beyond 
their reach. 




MANHATTAN'S NEWEST A&E MAGAZINE 
MONTHLY IN THE COLLEGIAN 




filial ^rtSMHa-A Ml * «**JM *n- CHH Carf 



COLLEGIAN £*. 
ClassADS 

[*t them work/or you. 



****** 



l-HMlri to tmf m Vcl 



Royal Purple 



1993 



Acacia-Sept. 8 
Alpha Chi Omega-Sept. 8-9 
Alpha Delia Pi-Sept. 9-10 
Alpha Gamma Rho-Sept. 10-11 
Alpha Kappa Alpha-Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Kappa Lambda-Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Phi Alpha- Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Tau Omega- Sept. 14 
Alpha Xi Delta-Sept. 14-15 
Beta Sigma Psi-Sept. 1 5 
Beta Theta Pi-Sept. 15-16 
Chi Omega-Sept. 16-17 
Delta Delta Delta-Sept. 17-18 
Delta Sigma Phi-Sept. 18 
Delta Sigma Thcu-Scpt. 18 
Delta Tau Delta-Sept. 21 
Delta L'psi Ion -Sept. 21 
FarmHouse-Sept. 21 
Gamma Phi Beta- Sept. 21-22 
Kappa Alpha Psi-Sept, 22 
Kappa Alpha Theta- Sept. 22-23 
Kappa Delta-Sept. 23-24 
Kappa Kappa Gamma-Sept. 24-25 
Kappa Sigma-Sept. 25 
Lambda Chi Alpha-Sept. 25 
Omega Pst Phi-Sept. 28 
Phi Beta Sigma-Sept. 28 
Phi Delta Thcu-Scpt 28 
Phi Gamma Delta- Sept. 29 
Phi Kappa Tau-Scpt. 29 



Phi Kappa Theta-Sept. 28 
Pi Beta Phi-Sept. 29-30 
Pi Kappa Alpha-Sept. 30 
Pi Kappa Thcta-Scpt. 30 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon-Oct. 1 
Sigma Chi-Oct. I 
Sigma Gamma Rho-Oct. 1-2 
Sigma Kappa-Oct. 5-6 
Sigma Nu-Oct. 6 
Sigma Phi Epsilon-Oct. 6 
Sigma Sigma Sigma-Oct. 7-8 
Tau Kappa Epsilon-Oct. 8 
Theta Xi-Oct. 8 
Triangle-Oct. 9 
Zcta Phi Bera-Oct. 9 
Boyd-Oct. 9 
Clovia-Oct. 12 
Edwards-Oct. 12 
Ford-Oct 12 
Goodnow-Oct. 13 
Haymaker-Oct. 13 
Marlart-Oct. 13 
Moore-Oct, 14 
Putnam-Oct. 14 
Smith-Oct. 15 
Smurthwaite-Oct. 15 
VanZiLe-Oct. 15 
West-Oct. 15 
OffCampus-Oct. 16-30 



Picture yourself in the 1993 
Royal Purple yearbook. 



Photos will be taken from 8:30 
a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. 
in the K-State Union Room 209. 



If you arc a greek member, but 
live in a residence hall or off 
campus, please have your photo 
taken with your fraternity or so- 
rority. 



Your Q 8 A about 



Q. How do I submit a 
news item? 

A , The Collegian welcomes any 
news tip, story or information about 
any special event. Call us at 532-6556. 
If there's time, give us a news release 
with your name, phone number and 
address. Include the who, what, 
when, where, why and how about 
your event. We don't run all releases, 
but we do publish newsworthy 
information for our student 
readership. 

Q. Whom can I talk to 
if I believe a story 
has an error? 

A. The Collegian editor is the person 
to whom you should direct questions 
and complaints about stories. Call 
532-6556. Please leave a message with 
Student Publications if editor is not 
available. 

Q. How do I submit a 
letter to the editor? 

A. The Collegian welcomes all views 
about current issues. Letters should 
be signed, with the writer's name, 
address, phone number and ID for 
verification purposes. Letters are 
edited for space, punctuation and 
grammar, but not for content. 



Q. How do I place a 
classified ad? 

A. Stop by Kedzie 103, just east of 
the K-State Union. You can sell your 
unwanted items and buy the things 
you want in the Collegian classifieds. 
We take classified ads from 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. weekdays. 

Q. How do I place a 
display ad? 

A. Come to Kedzie 118, and one of 
our advertising representatives will 
be glad to work with you on ad 
campaigns or budgets. Call 532-6560 
for more information. 



Names and numbers to call: 




Samantha Branson 




Editor in chief 


6556 


Annette Spreer 




Advertising manager 


6560 


Ron Johnson 




Director/news adviser 


6555 


Gloria Freeland 




Associate director/advertising adviser 6555 


Linda Puntnev 




Assistant director/yearbook adviser 


6555 


Jackie Harmon 




Ad billing/special events 


6555 


Patricia Hudgins 




Classified advertising manager 


6555 


Wanda Haynie 




Advertising production coordinator 


6555 


Ann Foster 




Bookkeeping/personnel manager 


6555 



OLLEGIAN 



; h^i • Ked/ic 10.1 <H' s 






6 




PORTS 



AUGUST 25, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



VOLLEYBALL 



Quitters need not apply 



' 



.' 




J, KVU WYATTCotogtvi 

K*State volleyball coach Patti Hagemeyer and players run through drills Monday afternoon In Abeam Fieldhouse The team wilt play its first game Sept. 4. 



"This Is a 
very focused 



The net will be filled with new faces this year 



STEVIROCK 



determined 
group. This 
team is not 
even from the 
same book as 
last year's." 

PATTI HAGEMEYER 



Cotttfitn 

The Wildcat volleyball team 
will enter the 1992 season with six 
new players, a new coach and 
something it was previously 
lacking — a sense of confidence. 

"This is a very focused and - 
determined group," said second- 
year coach Patti Hagemeyer. "This 
team is not even from the same 
book as last year's." 

Hagemeyer, who guided her 
squad to a 10-19 record a year ago, 
including III in league play, saw 
five of her players quit the team 
during the 1991 regular season. 

The players" decisions to leave 
the team. Hagemeyer said, were 
based on their acceptance of 
mediocnty. Hagemeyer said she 
wanted her squad to excel and not 
all of the players were ready for the 
challenge. 

"It wasn't a surprise to me thai 
they quit," she said. 

But doesn't the chance of a 
repeat of last year worry the coach 
at all? 



"It would never happen," 
Hagemeyer said. "It's really not an 
issue anymore. This learn 
■.hallenges each other to do better, 
They are very interested in turning 
things around. They don't like to 
lose." 

The 1992 Wildcat sptkers are 
indeed a new team. Only five 
players will return from last year's 
squad. 

Joining them will be six 
freshman players and a graduate 
assistant coach who played under 
Hagemeyer at Southern Illinois 
University. Lori Simpson, who 
played at SI U as recently as last 
year, will assist Hagemeyer in 
coaching the young squad. 

"I'm a firm believer in kids and 
athletes with a desire to excel." 
Hagemeyer said. 

"She (Simpson I is a person that 
works extremely hard. She's been 
a very positive influence on the 
team," she said. 

During her 1991 season as a 
senior at SRI, Simpson earned the 
player of the year award and was a 



first-team. all-Gateway Conference 
selection. She set the school record 
for digs in a season and was named 
the conference player of the w eek 
three times. 

The experience and the skill 
Simpson brings w ith her to the 
team are valuable commodities, 
Hagemeyer said. 

"Lori can pass along some 
insights on what it's like to be an 
athlete," she said. "Physically, 
she's very talented and very 
strong." 

Simpson, who wasn't pan of the 
staff a year ago and thus missed 
much of the turmoil, said she is 
excited to be a pan of the Wildcat 
program. 

"It's a good program — an 
enthusiastic program." Simpson 
said. "I am very excited to see a 
team like this. The freshmen came 
in ready to work hard, and so did 
the upperclassmea They have the 
potential to be up in the top of the 
Big Eight this year." 

If that is to happen. Kathy 
Sax ton, the sole senior on the 



squad, may have to assume a 
leadership role once again and 
guide the young spikers. 
Hagemeyer said. 

During the 1991 campaign, 
Saxton received honorable mention 
alt-Big Eight status for her 
performance. She led the Wildcats 
with 500 kills and 46 aces. She 
also had 2 1 8 digs — good for third 
on the team. 

"Last year. Saxton got her first 
taste of the leadership rote." 
Hagemeyer said. "She no longer 
waits for someone else to make the 
first move — she just does it. 
Kathy will have a great year." 

And that may be important on a 
team that has six freshmen. But 
that lack of experience doesn't 
necessarily concern Hagemeyer. 

"It's hard for players to 
integrate that fast," she said. "But 
it happened in the preseason. We 
had a great preseason." 

The regular season will begin 
Sept. 4 with the Stroh's 
Light/Continental Inn/Best 
Western Invitational in Manhattan 



HOME VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE 



Sept. 4 and 5 



KSU INVITATIONAL 
Toledo 
Wichita St. 
St. Louis 



Sept. 6 AKRON 
21 DRAKE 
30 KANSAS 

Oct. 10 OKLAHOMA 



Oct. 11 NE ILLINOIS 
14 IOWA 
21 NEBRASKA 
23 N. IOWA 



Oct. 28 MISSOURI 

31 UMKC 
Nov. 21 COLORADO 



column fmamammmmmtammm 

Sport heads 
need some 
lessons in 
geography 

The National League needs some remedial 
geography. 

Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent almost 
had the Chicago Cubs and the St. Louis Cardinals 
in the National League West and the Atlanta 
Braves and the Cincinnati Reds in the National 
League East. 

This, according to Vincent, was in the best 
interest of baseball. 

It should have been done when the National 
League split into geographic divisions in 1969. 
Someone in the league office must have flunked 
U.S. Geography 101 to put the Reds and Braves 
in the West. 

Someone else must have failed the course in 
the National Football League. In some way or 
another, these teams are in the wrong geographic 
division. 

■ The Atlanta Falcons, who play in the 
Eastern time zones, must travel to the West Coast 
to play the San Francisco 49ers and the Los 
Angeles Rams. 

■ The 49ers and the Rams must travel to 
Atlanta and New Orleans to play (he Saints, who 
are in the Western 

Division, 

■ The Phoenix 
Cardinals are in the 
Eastern Division, which 
means they have to travel 
to play the New York 
Giants, the Philadelphia 
Eagles, and the 
Washington Redskins. The 
trio must travel to Phoenix 
to play. 

NFL Commissioner 
Paul Tagliabue should 
persuade owners and the 
Players Association to 
realign the divisions in the 
American and National 
conferences. 

With the chance of expansion in the league. I 
will add St. Louis, where the Cardinals used to 
play, and Charlotte. N. C. to the list, since both 
cities have invested time and money to bring an 
NFL team to their metropolitan area. 

In the National Conference Eastern Division, 
(he Giants, the Eagles, and the Redskins stay. 
Coming in are the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and 
the Detroit Lions from the NFC Central division. 

The NFC Central would include the Chicago 
Bears, the Minnesota Vikings, and the Green Bay 
Packers. The Falcons and the Saints would join 
(he conference. 

The Dallas Cowboys, the Cardinals and the 
expansion St. Louis team collect with the Rams 
and the 49ers to make up the NFC West. 

For the American Conference, the Pittsburgh 
Steelers move to the AFC East to replace the 
Indianapolis Colts. Steelers would battle the 
Buffalo Bills, the New England Patriots, the New 
York Jets, and the Miami Dolphins for the 
conference title. 

The Cincinnati Bengals and the Cleveland 
Browns remain in the AFC Central. The Colts, 
the expansion Charlotte team, and the Kansas 
City Chiefs realign to the AFC Central. 

Finally, the Los Angeles Raiders, the Seattle 
Seahawks. the San Diego Chargers, and the 
Denver Broncos remain in the AFC West. The 
Houston Oilers join the group. 

The change would make the NFC East and the 
AFC East the toughest divisions, suggested by 
last season's record and team history. 

The NFC East has two division winners from 
last season's records, the Redskins and the Lions. 
The Giants have won two Super Bowls and the 
Eagles have appeared in recent playoff games. 

The AFC East shows every team has gone to 
the Super Bowl — three of the five teams have 
won it. Putting the Steelers on the schedule would 
make it harder for teams to win the conference 
title, even if the Steelers aren't up to par. 




BRIAN 

Anderson 



NFL PRESEASON 



Chiefs spank the Bills, 35-0 



ASSOCTATMP P m*» 

KANSAS CITY — The 
Chiefs sent the Bills 
shuffling back to Buffalo 
Monday night with a 35-0 
rout. 

Dave Krieg, the 12-year 
Seattle veteran signed as a 
free agent, showed Chiefs 
fans the downfield passing 
attack and scrambling ability 
that had been lacking the 
previous three seasons under 
Steve DeBerg and handed the 
defending AFC champions 
their first exhibition shutout 
in 22 years. 

The Chiefs scored on four 
of their first five possessions. 



CHIEFS 

ROUNDUP 




I New OB Dave Krieg passed 
tor 1 60 yards and two 
touchdowns in two quarters. 

I All three Kansas City QBs 
threw touchdown passes. 
Kansas City's Doug Terry, a 
tree agent defensive back 
from KU, left the field with a 
concussion 



working mostly against 
Buffalo reserves, and made it 
a second straight miserable 
Monday night for the Bills in 
Kansas City. 

Last October, when the 
Chiefs played host to (heir 
first Monday night game in 



eight years, the Bills suffered 
a 33-6 humiliation. The Bills, 
who haven't been shut out in 
(he regular season since 
1985. had last failed to score 
in an exhibition game in 
1970, in a 34-0 loss to Green 
Bay. 



Krieg hit touchdown 
passes of 6 and 24 yards to 
LI. Birden and led an 89- 
yard, second-quarter drive 
that Harvey Williams capped 
with a 7-yard run as the 
Chiefs hiked their exhibition 
record to 1 -2 and dropped the 
Bills to 1-2. 

Buffalo's Jim Kelly split 
first-half playing time with 
Gale Gilbert and hit five of 
eight passes for 52 yards. 

Chiefs Doug Terry, a free 
agent defensive back from 
Kansas, was removed- from 
the field on a stretcher after 
suffering what was later 
described as a concussion. 



SPORTS DIGEST 


►league presidents 


► OKOYE ENDS SILENCE 


CALL MEETING ON FAY 


AND SIGNS WITH KC 


NEW YORK — The two league 


KANSAS CITY — Running back 


presidents today called a special major 


Christian Okoye, the 1969 NFL rushing 


league meeting for Sept. 3 to discuss Fay 


champion, ended his holdout and signed a 


Vincent's status, overriding the 


series ol three one-year contracts with the 


commissioner's refusal to convene the 


Chiefs Monday 


session. 


Okoye s signing leaves wide receiver 


American League President Bobby 


Stephone Paige as the only unsigned 


Brown and National League President Bill 


player. 


White announced the meeting, which will 


No details were announced. Okoye, a 


be at Rosemont, III. 


6-foot- 1 , 260-pound fullback in his sixth 


Vincent, vowing never to resign, 


year, rushed tor 1,480 yards in 1989,805 


Thursday refused the request tor a 


in 1990 and 1.031 last year. 


meeting and said he had retained Brendan 


Okoye did not play in Monday night's 


Sullivan Jr., the Washington lawyer who 


35-0 Chiefs victory against the Buffalo 


defended Oliver North, to 'respond to any 


BiHs. 


inappropriate action.* 





■■•■■*■— *- 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGLAN 



August 25, 1992 y 



i 



Delta Upsilons in top four at convention 



mmYMm 

Colk|un 

K-State's Delta Upsilon house 
placed as one of the top four out of 
1 09 chapters in the nation at their 
national convention this summer. 

The top four, called sweepstakes 
finalists, arc not ranked first 



through fourth but recognized 
collectively. Each received a bowl 
and special recognition at the 
annual convention July 3 1 -Aug, 2 
in Miami. 

"This chapter has been out- 
standing for the last 20 to 25 years," 
said Bernard Franklin, assistant 



dean of student life and DU 
alumnus. 

"This year, they substantiated 
themselves by attracting quality 
men with a set focus," he said. 

This chapter goes beyond the 
traditional role of a fraternity house, 
Franklin said, catling them 



STATS 



•• 



Dunn testifies Remeta 
would have killed her 



Defense says 

brutal ization led 
to crime spree 



ASSOCIATED 



TOPEKA, Kan. — Lisa Dunn, 
charged with murder and 
kidnapping, testified Monday that 
her brutal boyfriend, Daniel 
Remeta, would have killed her and 
threatened to pour battery acid on 
her if she had attempted to flee 
during a multi-state journey into 
crime. 

"I still have nightmares," Dunn 
said of the spree that ended Feb. 1 3. 
1985 during a shootout at a Rawlins 
County farmhouse. 

"Everything he did seemed to 
scare me more," she said during her 
daylong testimony. She frequently 
fought back tears, and at one point 
Shawnee County District Judge 
James Macnish Jr. called a break 
when she broke down crying. 

Remeta, the principal instigator 
of the crime spree, is facing the 
death penalty in Florida, where he 
was found guilty of murder. He has 
been found guilty of four other 
killings — one in Arkansas and 
three in Kansas. 

Dunn described how Remeta 
beat her, deprived her of food, 
raped her and burned her with 
lighted cigarettes during their trip. 



We Take Tips! 

K A S 1 A I lIAti 

COLLEGIAN 



and beige blouse, Dunn was the 
first witness defense attorneys 
called after the state rested its case 
Friday. A week shy of her 26th 
birthday, she was IS at the time the 
crimes were committed. 

The trial is the second for Dunn 
on two counts of murder and two 
counts of kidnapping in connection 
with the February 1985 rampage 
that began in Florida and ended in 
northwest Kansas. The first, in 
Thomas County in 1985. resulted in 
a jury convicting her. 

Six people, including one of the 
suspects, 
Mark 
Walter, 
were killed, 
and three 
others were 
shot in four 
states during 
the trip. 

Police 
cornered tbe 
suspects at 
t h e 
farmhouse 
after they stole a truck and 
kidnapped two men from the 
Levant, Kan., grain elevator. Dunn 
said Walter was shot in the head by 
police as he helped her out of the 
truck. 

"I asked him what was going on. 
and he was hit in the head." she 
said. "Dead instantly, stuff coming 



TO THE EDITOR 



may be brought to Kediie 116. 



"I still have 
nightmares. 
... Everything 
he did 
seemed to 
scare me 
more." 

USA DUNN 



A federal judge ordered a new 
trial because funds were not made 
available to the defense during 
Dunn's first trial to develop a 
battered woman syndrome defense. 

Dunn said she met Remeta al a 
party in Traverse City, where her 
boyfriend had brought another girl. 

"1 was really upset." she said. 
"He was trying to cheer me up. He 
was just being nice. He was just 
attentive to me and my feelings at 
that time." 

Because of problems she was 
having with her parents, she said, 
she moved in with Remeta's family. 

"He asked about my concerns 
and my life," Dunn testified. "He 
wrote me some poetry." 

She also said he told her how he 
was "picked on" in prison and by 
people in Traverse City. 

She said (hey, along with Walter, 
decided to go to Florida to start a 
new life. Dunn said she thought 
they would find jobs and stay out of 
trouble when they started on the 
trip, but Remeta soon started 
talking about committing crimes. 

"I suddenly realized it wasn't 
always him being picked on." she 
said. 

As they crossed into Florida, she 
told Remeta she wanted to go 
home. She testified that he became 
very angry, holding a gun to her 
head and later sticking it into her 
mouth. 




progressive and focused men who 
do hard work for the community. 

"I am really proud of them," 
Franklin said. "I am really proud to 
be an alumnus of this chapter." 

This recognition is based on all 
aspects of the house by the 
Internationa! Fraternity Board of 



Directors. These include 
scholarship, iniramurals. public 
relations, philanthropy work, 
leadership and campus in- 
volvement. Franklin said. 

Last year, the DUs won fourth 
place for grades and ninth place in 
intramurals. 



"1 feel ihe brotherhood is gre*it 
within our house," said Jon Seiei, 
internal vice president and junior in 
landscape architecture. "Our work 
has been really good in the 
community and with our 
philanthropy of working with the 
homeless children." 




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Dread Zeppelin to headline Welcome Back Concert 



Colle$Mn 

Natural progression. 

Maybe this was in the mind of 
Dread Zeppelin's former drummer, 
Paul Masselli, when he decided to 
go on a walk in New Zealand 
earlier this year and never returned. 

Love and a buffet line. 

These things aided in lead singer 
Tortelvis's recent departure from 
Dread, He fell in love with his 
"little missy" and has chosen her. as 
well as a happy retirement to a 
buffet line. 

A logical progression. 

At least according to the new 
lead singer of Dread. Gary B.I.B.B. 
(Bastard Impersonating Butt Boy). 

Dread Zeppelin will headline the 
Welcome Back Concert, which 



begins at 3 p.m. Saturday at 
Memorial Stadium. 

What do band members say 
about playing in Manhattan as the 
kickoff for a 100-date U.S. tour to 
promote the Oct. 6 release of their 
third album. "It's Not Unusual".' 

"Il seemed as good a place as 
any to start off." Gary said. "We're 
excited to get it going." 

The new Dread Zeppelin 
encapsulates the same thinking and 
the usual reggae, rockabilly tunes 
mixed with a new sound. 

Disco is back for real (his time. 

And Gary means it. 

A pioneer in disco, fresh out of 
the 1970s, Gary remains a groovin" 
guy who's out to dance. Or, as he 
puts it, "cut the rug." 

Gary is not new to the Dreads. 
He grew up with Tortelvis in 



Memphis, and when Tortelvis 
decided to retire, he asked Gary to 
take over as lead singer. 

"Tortelvis gave all he had, so he 
asked me to continue on with the 
band." Gary said. "It was an 
unexpected change, which is what 
Dread Zeppelin thrives on." 

Crazy rhythms, brakes and 
fenders. 

New Dread drummer Spice was 
apparently discovered in a Los 
Angeles tow yard. 

Dread guitarist Jan Paul Jo was 
looking for car pans for his 1970 
Cadillac. He auditioned Spice on 
the spot and asked him to join. 

The new Dread Zeppelin. 

This time around, there's more 
emphasis on the band. New tunes. 
Reggae. A shift to disco at times. 

And what about that love for 



Elvis? 

According to Gary, it was as 
natural a thing as any that he sounds 
a bit like Elvis. It is a tribute to 
longtime friend Tortelvis. 

"Dread Zeppelin still has the 
great guitar lines, in tribute to 
Jimmy Page," said Steve Karas, 
publicist for I.R.S. Records. 
Dread's label. "And for the future 
of the band, this was the best 
change that could evolve. 

"It's a different style of music. 
true to Dread Zeppelin that fuels 
itself." 

But the Dread performance is not 
a completely new show. 

According to Gary, the live 
shows won't be much different 
from the past. He said Dread will 
stay true to the club scene and 
smaller audiences, since it's a very 



portable show. 

"The new Dread Zeppelin will 
be a surprise to the public, and it's 
something we're going to have fun 
with," Gary said. 

Gelling Dread to play wasn't 
exactly easy, according to Kim 
Harms. Union Program Council 
special events adviser. 

"We were a little tow on funds 
when trying to find a headlining 
band for the Welcome Back 
Concert. But we worked out a deal 
with Dread Zeppelin, and they were 
really excited to play at KSU." 
Harms said. 

"This year, we're hoping to 
attract a majority of K-State 
students, hopefully about 3.000 to 
4.000," Harms said. "Since it's 
earlier in the day, we're trying to 
encourage students to bring 



WELCOME 

BACK 

CONCERT 

This is the lineup for the 
concert, which begins at 3 p.m. 
Saturday ai Memorial Stadium. 
Tickets are $4 and can be 
purchased at two locations <n the 
K-State Union — the information 
Counter on the second floor and 
the UPC Office on the third floor. 

Truck Stop Love 
Roach Factory 
L.A. Ramblers 
Dread Zeppelin 



Frisbees, just hang out and listen to 
some good music." 



VIDEO REVIEW 



rv Tonya Foster 



► STOP OR MY MOM WILL SHOOT 



"Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot" is tike a 
confusing road map. The plot resembles three 
highways that never connect and leave a person 
lost. 

The trouble starts when Joe Bomowski's 
(Sylvester Stallone) mother Tutie (Estelle Getty) 
comes to visit. While she is there, she manages to 
witness a drive-by shooting and interfere in his 
professional as well as his private life. 

It is the standard light-hearted comedy, if 



nothing is expected by the viewer. Even a little 
action didn't spice up this idiotic comedy. The 
"funny" one-liners were thrown in to keep the 
story going, but they fail as well. 

The laughs are few and far between, but most 
can be attributed to Getty. 

Stallone is a proven box office draw, but face 
it. he can't do comedy. Figure it out. Stallone, 
from your last comedic flop — "Oscar." 



► THE HAND THAT ROCKS THE CRADLE 



For chills that will thrill you. rent "The Hand 
That Rocks The Cradle." 

"The hand that rocks that cradle is the hand 
that rules the world." is the motto Peyton the 
nanny operates by. 

Rebecca DeMomay plays a cunning nanny 
that slowly takes over Michael and Claire's (Matt 
McCoy and Annabel la Sciorra) family. 



Peyton decides to manipulate the family after 
she is convinced Claire is responsible for her 
husband's death. 

The story has substance. It follows a direction 
and knows where it is going. DeMornay is 
consistently crafty in her endeavors, a believable 
psychotic as the nanny from hell. 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Foreign films fading in U.S. 



AfOCUTTO 

LOS ANGELES — In 1990, the 
small Italian film "Cinema 
Paradiso." starring Philippe Noiret, 
earned more money than the highly 
touted American release "The Two 
Jakes," with Jack Nicholson and Eli 
Wallach. 

Just two years later, though, 
moviegoers are saying arrivedcrci 
to cinematic imports. Such movies 
rarely outperform U.S. titles, and 



some people believe the box-office 
viability of foreign- language films 
stands in jeopardy. 

"It's one of the toughest things 
in the world to make money with 
foreign-language films." said 
Harvey Weinstcin. co-chairman of 
Miramax Films, one of only a few 
companies distributing such 
movies. 

Indeed, the major movie studios 
won't touch foreign films, except to 



remake them in English with 
marquee names. 

At 20th Century Fox they're 
working on a new version of 
Holland's "The Vanishing" (with 
Jeff Bridges) and Warner Bros, is 
retooling France's "La Femme 
Nikita" (starring Bridget Fonda) 
■ See FOREIGN pi ge 10 




SELL YOUR SPRING & 
SUMMER TEXTBOOKS 

K-State Union Bookstore 
August 24 - 26, 1 992 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 




We buy all books with current market value 



K-State Union 




McCain Tickets 

Become an usher at McCain Auditorium. 
In return for your time we will give you 
free tickets to the exciting events 
scheduled in the McCain Performance ' 
Series. 

Join us at an orientation meeting in the 
McCain Lobby on Tuesday, August 25 
at 4:30 p.m. 

If you are unable to attend, 
call 532-7026 for details. 




Mini Lunch Buffet 



Free Delivery 



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$4.95 per person 
*, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. 



Open 7 Days 



Mini Buffet Features Daily Soup. Egg Roll, Cnspon Wonton. Crab 
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Beef/Broccoli 
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Seafood Omelette 

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calculator waiting for you when 
you purchase an HP 48SX or an 
HP4KS between June 1, 1992, 
and October 31. 1992. You 11 get 




a bonus book that's gotxt for free 
software, a free PC link cable 
and hundreds of dollars back 
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Its a really big offer. Wort li more 
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Beyond all the bonuses, you II 
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HP 48 calculators have over 
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H 



HEWLETT 
PACKARD 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 25, 1 992 Q 



Wildfires rage on in California and Idaho 



ROUND MOUNTAIN, Calif. — 
Pre-dawn winds blew new life into 
a 64,000-acre wildfire Monday, 
rousting hundreds out of their beds 
and into their cars as the flames 
jumped control lines in at least two 
places. 

The five-day-old fine already had 
destroyed more than 300 homes, 
and hundreds more were in its path. 

"A sheriffs deputy woke us up 
at 4 a.m. and told us, "Hey, Get out! 
The fire's coming!'" said Dave 
Buddy, 43, who lives near Oak Run 
in Shasta County, 

In Idaho, meanwhile, firefighters 
took advantage of briefly cooler 
temperatures Monday as they tried 
to cut off a 257.000-acre fire about 
30 miles east of Boise. 

"They're flanking the sides of 
the fire, and they're going to try to 
pinch it off," said Kay Beall, Boise 
National Forest spokeswoman, 

"This cooler weather has helped 



slow things down a lot, but we still 
have some erratic winds, so the 
fire's still moving." 

The Foothills fire reportedly 
destroyed Idaho's oldest ponderosa 
pine tree and huge amounts of big 
game habitat, as well as many deer 
and elk. 

Across Idaho, more than 5.000 
firefighters continued working on 
fires that have burned across nearly 
320.000 acres of forest and range. 

About 1.800 people were 
fighting the Foothills blaze, which 
entered its sixth day. Crews hoped 
to contain it by Sept. 6. 

In California, the five-day-old 
Fountain fire breached defenses on 
at least two fronts, but authorities 
said thick smoke made it hard to 
say whether the blaze would reach 
hundreds of homes in subdivisions 
in its path. 

Unexpectedly strong wind from 
the east gusting to 35 mph pushed 
part of the 63,000-acre Fountain 
fire outside a containment line 



Monday morning, said Mike 
Weger, a captain with the 
California Department of Forestry. 

The fire destroyed 307 homes 
when it roared through Round 
Mountain and several other tiny 
communities about 200 miles 
northeast of San Francisco. It has 
blackened enough commercial 
timber to build 50,000 houses. 

Bulldozer crews cleared 80 miles 
of lines around the fire, and 
containment was at 40 percent, the 
California Division of Forestry said. 

But winds of up to 25 mph were 
expected to worsen Northern 
California fire conditions in a 
region bone-dry from six years of 
drought. 

Elsewhere, forecasted winds 
from 25 Jo 30 mph and low 
humidity threatened to kick the 
6.400-acre Barker fire over 
containment lines, CDF Capt. Bob 
Buhrle said. 



WILDFIRES 

Fires are still spreading 
rapidly in Idaho and 

California. 



rOOTHILLS FIRE — 
Has destroyed 
320,000 acres. 



i 




AWARD 



Phi Alpha Theta 
chapter of year 



History honorary 

wins award for ninth 
straight year 



Coltefiwi 

The K-State Phi Alpha Theta 
chapter, a history honorary, has 
won the chapter of the year award 
tor the ninth straight year. 

Donald Mrozek, head of the 
history department, said 
involvement of students other than 
undergraduates is one reason the 
program is so strong. 

The honorary is also open to 
graduate students and alumni. The 
basic membership requirement is a 
high grade point average in history 
courses, as well as overall. 

"Some students ask themselves 
what relationship they want to have 



with history after college," said 
Mrozek. "Phi Alpha Theta help 
people to get a better size of hov. 
history helps them view the world. 
It provides a different tilt to their 
lives, because the greater the 
opportunity you get to discuss the 
events of the world, you get a better 
feel for what's around you." 

Laurence Carver, graduate 
student in American history am! 
past president of Phi Alpha Theta 
said he thinks the chapter won the 
competition because it was active. 

"The sheer number and variety 
of activities that we did was whai 
helped us win," Carver said. "We 
did everything from having a book 
sale to visiting the cavalry museum 
at Fort Riley to sponsoring 
speakers. We did a lot of service 
activities to help promote j 

■ See AWARD page 10 



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Recreational 

Services 



Managers Meeting 

Thursday, Aug. 27 
K- State Union 
Little Theatre 

4 p.m. 

* All Intramural Managers must attend'! 

Entry Deadline 

Friday, Aug. 28 

5 p.m. / 
Rec Services Office 

(Flag Football. Soccer, and Individu 
Sports}. 




Soccer Captains 

Thursday, Sept. 3 

8 p.m. 

K-State Union, Room 

213 

Meeting is mandatory for all captains!!! 




Officials 

Flag Football and Soccer 

Football clinic: Sunday. Aug. 30 

at 6:30 in Union 213 

Soccer clinic: Wednesday. Sept. 2 

at 6:30 in Union 213 

Starting pay — $4.50/ hour 

idatory attendance for all meetings. 

Fitness Sessions 

Aerobics: M-F 6:30 ajn 

M-Th 4:20 p.m. 

M-F 1 1:45 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 

Begins Monday, Aug. 24 

Aqua-Fitness: 

M.T.Th 7:30 p.m. 

Begins Monday, Aug. 24 

Outdoor Rental 

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*;» Fri. 4-6 p.m. 
Sat. 1 1 a.m.- noon 

anoes. Tents and more!) 



Rec Services Office 


532-6980 


Court Reservations 


532-6950 


Outdoor Rental 


532-6894 


Rec Check 


532-6000 


IM Hotline 


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UPC 

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BAND ENTRY DEADLINE FRIDAY, 
AUGUST 28, 4PM PICK UP APPLICATIONS 
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JUPCAftt 







A Q August 25, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Officer's bond modified; students sustain 

inHap rp<rtrirt<j cnntnct winning tradition 

U-W-JllV^ 1 V^JJH IV'^lJ V'VraMl'MV'l' CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 not necessarily ihow 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

amount. 

"1 will allow the bond to be 
modified." Graham said. "He will 
pay $1,500 by cash and the balance 
by signature, so long as he has one 
other person to cosign." 

Graham also warned Woodruff 
not to have contact with the alleged 
victim. 

"He is not allowed any kind of 
contact in any form with the alleged 
victims in this case," Graham said. 
"As long as the victim continues to 
reside in the previous residence, the 
defendant is not to go about that 



residence unless accompanied by a 
police officer." 

Because the charges are felonies. 
Woodruff was not required to enter 
a plea of guilty or not guilty to the 
judge today. He will appear again 
before .Graham Monday, and 
Graham will set a date for a 
preliminary hearing. 

Woodruff had no comment 
outside the courtroom. 

After the arraignment, Alvan 
Johnson, director of the Riley 
County Police Department, 
responded to allegations that 
Woodruff once worked for RCPD 
and left under suspicious 



circumstances. 

"RCPD has only been in 
existence since Jan. 1, 1974," 
Johnson said. "Prior to that, the 
county had law enforcement 
through the county sheriff and 
Manhattan police. ... Woodruff 
worked from March 6, 1967, and 
resigned Sept. 1, 1975." 

Johnson said he wasn't sure why 
Woodruff resigned from the 
Manhattan Police Department. 

'To the best of my recollections, 
he was not asked to leave," Johnson 
said. "But I was not in a position to 
have known." 



Drug arrests up, usage down 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

in the last six years, he said. 

Again Arck credits tougher laws 
and education as factors. 

"There is no one thing which 
caused the decreases." he said. 
"Different things change different 
people in different ways." 

Capt. Allen Ray nor, commander 
of the Criminal Investigations 
Division of the Riley County Police 
Department, said statistics can be 
made to say whatever you want 
them to say. But Raynor said he 
agreed drug use is down. 

"Just because the police 
department makes more arrests 



doesn't mean there is more of a 
problem," Raynor said. 

A recent increase in arrests is not 
due to a bigger problem, Raynor 
said. The Riley County Police 
arrested 33 people under charges 
relating to drugs in the first six 
months of this year, compared to 20 
in the first six months of 1991 . 

"We have received a state grant 
allowing us to establish two 
detectives working strictly on 
investigations of illegal drugs. 

"Now we're out there beating 
the bush making it happen (the 
increase of arrests)," he said. "Our 
efforts have more than doubled." 



Raynor said he believes having a 
youthful community makes drugs 
more readily available. 

"The average age of people 
living in Manhattan is around 26 
years old. There is the University, 
and an Army base, and this draws 
many young people and drugs to 
the area," he said. 

"Our focus is not on casual 
users. We focus on mainly dealers. 

"We have just finished a six- 
month investigation resulting in the 
recent arrests of quite a few people 
for dealing drugs. However, we're 
looking at quality, not quantity," 
Raynor said. 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

awards," said Dennis Law. head of 
the Department of Landscape 
Architecture. "We even set our own 
record for the number of awards 
received this year." 

K~State has been ranked first in 
the nation in the society's 
competition since 1976. 

Students who enter the 
competition work on their projects 
for a semester as undergraduate 
theses. Eventually, the projects 
become a development of their 
thesis work, said Robert Page. 
project adviser and professor of 
landscape architecture. 

The competition is judged by a 
blind jury, which does not see the 
students' or schools' names on the 
projects. 

"The students work really hard 
on their projects," Page said. "The 
students who win these awards are 



not necessarily those in the top of 
their class.' 

Students who won 

commendations are fifth-year 
seniors Karen Mans, Edward 
Dermody, William Cline, and 
Jeffrey Davis, and graduate student 
Eileen Bergt. 

Fifth-year seniors Mark 
Zielsdorf and Terry Berkbuegler 
won first place in the national stone 
competition. 

Cline and Davis also won 
honorable mention in a national 
Olympic fields competition, which 
was for professional architects. 

Page said the awards received 
this year will be a big incentive for 
the incoming class. 

"The awards help keep K- State 
in the forefront of the national 
publicity," Page said. "With this 
good reputation, we have the firms 
calling us." 



Award for history group 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 

historical understanding." 

Jeff Bottenberg. a K-State 
graduate, said it is difficult to 
maintain interest in a campus group 
after graduation. But is worth it, he 
said. 

Mrozek said he disliked history 
as a high-school student but 
eventually gained interest as a 
result of a college history course. 
He said teachers get students 
interested in history, but the 



students who go further into 
historical studies do it because they 
want to learn more from the figures 
in history. 

"I suspect that students respond 
to examples that are closer to 
them," Mrozek said. "I am sure that 
there were several who enrolled in 
the history course that President 
Wefald taught because he was the 
instructor, but they stayed in it 
because it was good. Curiosity will 
only hold you for about a week." 



Foreign 
films face 
obstacles 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 

and "My Father the Hero" (with 
Gerard Depardicu, who starred in 
the French version). 

Experts believe several factors 
conspire against the imports, 
including the recession, a tougher 
video and cable- TV market, a buy- 
American prejudice and a collapse 
in cultural sophistication. 

"People would rather not read 
subtitles," said Mitch Goldman, 
president of New Line Cinema's 
distribution arm. 

Miramax's Weinstein said: 
"College campuses now want 
•Terminator 2.* I saw (Germany's) 
'The Nasty Girl* with a college 
audience, and they thought it was a 
drag they had to read the subtitles. 
A whole cinema tradition is being 
lost in this country." 

Without question, the European 
talent pool has been drained. 

Several of the continent's most 
accomplished filmmakers have 
been lured by Hollywood's riches 
and have abandoned their native 
languages. 

"We lost almost our entire 
audience to the American market," 
said director Uli Edel, who left 
Germany for the United States to 
direct "Last Exit to Brooklyn" and 
the upcoming "Body of Evidence." 

"1 was amazed when I arrived 
here that everybody was already 
here. [ mean, (Bernardo) Benolucci 
is here." he said. 



E 



SSENTIALS 



DOUBLE BARRELED 



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JIM'S JOURNAL 




JIMDKKERS 



ONE DAY TO LIVE 



teas open atari a 




Introducing the main characters, the 
head honehos. the kicks in the groin, the 
bf)f Cheeze Whizzes, the people who will 
haunt the deep reservoirs of zirconium 
glucose that reside in sector seven of the 
human cerebellum. 

Sputnik A 22-year-old former 
Roseanne Barr groupie during her 
"Roseanne Sings Her Favorite Anthems" 
tour. Sputnik caused quite a national stir 
when he was quoted as having spotted 
Elvis (Costelio, that is) at the local 
restaurant in Moscow. There are no current 
photos of Sputnik, due to him being 
unphotogenic. (His face caught fire when 
he was 16, and his grandma put it out with 
a rake. 



BYSUEMMMAN 



Delilah Before she met Sputnik, she 
was the Soviet Union's best-known 
actress, starring in such blockbusters as 
"The Best Little Warehouse in Leningrad." 
"Home Alone With the KGB" and "The 
Doors" (co-starring Yakov Smirnoff). The 
best way to describe Delilah's looks is to 
imagine Telly Savalas with hair, the legs of 
Joan Jett and the voice of Maude. Perfect, 
eh? (sigh) 

Ogre Kornbutt Sputnik's half-sister. 
Quite the gymnast, but she is best-known 
for the rumor that she is the leader of an 
illegal gambling ring that specializes in 
wagering on bowling leagues. No need to 
describe her looks. Her name says it all. 



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SSENTIALS 



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crossword. Look for new features. 



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24 Maid or 
man 

lead in 

25 Poet, to 
a poet 

26 They're 
very 
practical 

30 Nice 
season 

31 Shrewd 
person 

32 Cake 
or meal 
lead-in 

33 Serving 



cart 

35 Unadulter- 
ated 

36 African 
tree 

37 Conduc- 
tor's wand 

38 Capital 
of North 
Vietnam 

40 Son of 
Odin 

42 Rubber 
tree 

43 Cut into 
pieces 

48 Fond du 
—.Wis. 

49 Mom's 



50 Role for 
young Ron 
Howard 

51 Inquire 

52 Court 
barriers 



S3 Treaty org. 
DOWN 

1 Monastery 

head: abbf 

2 Vine 
finisher? 

3 Cote mom 

4 On the 
schedule 

5 Word 
before 
mother 
or ladder 

6 '...— you 
any wool?" 

7 Western 
Indian 

S Capable 
of being 
stretched 

9 Escapes 
from jail 

10 — "Faiha* 
Hmes 

11 Tribe 
or dan 



Solution time: 24 mine. 



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16 Hebrew 
measure 

20 Wallach or 
Whitney 

21 Incite 

22 One ota 
pair 

23 Highly 
dangerous 

24 Land or 
line lead-in 

26 Wrinkle 

27 DOE'S 
command 

28 Poi source 

29 British gun 
31 Prospero's 

slave 

34 Court 

35 Prisoner's 
hope 

37 US editor 

38 Island 
dance 

39 ■— 1 1 toved 
you best" 

40 Camp 
shelter 

41 Bella 
Abzug's 
collection 

44 Baa's 
"Golden- 




STUMPED? 



For answers to today's cro ssword, cat 
1-901MS4^73l»fpwfmnutotoucr> 
pne/rolaryphowes.(t8«orily } A King Features service, NYC 



Yesterday's answer 6-25 



45 WWII org 

46 Intelli- 
gence 

47 Plastic or 
classic 
lead-in 



8-25 CRYPTOQUIP 

GSV TVLNVGIB GVZXSVI 

RH H Z B R M T . 'R DZMG 

GL DRWVM NB HLXRZO 

X R I X O V ■ 

Yettcrday'i Cryptoquip: OWNER OF A POSH 
STABLE FIRED A HORSE TRAINER WHO USED TO 
STIRRUP TROUBLE. 

Today's Cryptoquip clue: X equals C 



i 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




LASSIFIEDS 



August 25, 1992 A *f 

GET THE WORD OUT 

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN KEDZ1E 103 



. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






1 DAY 20 words or less — $5 

each word over 20 — $.20 per word 

2 DAYS 20 * ords or less — *® 25 

each word over 20 — $ 25 per word 

3 DAYS 20 words or less — $7.25 

each word over 20 — $.30 per word 

4 DAYS 20 words or less — $8 

each word over 20 — $ 35 per word 

5 DAYS 20 words or less ~ W 50 

each word over 20 — $.40 per word 
(consecutive day rate) 



HOW TO PAY 

U dwMMs mutl bt paid h Advance 
wrins you Nw m tftANthtd terount 
srHn Student PubfiCMOnL 

Cash, track, MtsttfCerd or VHa v* 

ic espied . There Is i S*0 Mtvtet enAroe 
on sU retunifd checks, 

We reoani the right to edit, rah*) or 
nroeartir eMIiriM Ad. 

HEADLINES 

For «n SKtn cfwgt, wv'H pMt • 
hMdHntlCkow fouf *tf to ctftti thi 



CANCELLATIONS 

Ct*taffM Mti mutl b* placed by H you sell your nam before your ad 

now the day txrtofe the date you -ear* hn ixpltwj, m w9 rtfund you tor Ac 

your «) to run. OoMiM dtlftiy *di Tsrra^fting days, 
mud bo placed by 4 am two worWnfl You mutl c*H us bttoro noon ih* day 

days prk* to 1M dale you srirtt your ad the ad Is to be published. 

^_ CORRECTIONS 

FREE POUND ADS ll]fo«»lndinA<mRiyiiute«, 

As i Mnrtot to you. wo run tound Kti caI us. W* accept mpdrwHti 

for ttuoo deye free ot char 90. tor the frtu strong, jrnaaiilef 1. 



Call 532-6555 to place your classified. 




PARKING 

OF THE 
UNION 



««»« OR WRITE 
532-6555 

-JiL *•**• ►« 103 

532-7309 lUnhatta*, Karv 



OFFICE HOURS 



MONDAY-FRIDAY 
8 a.m. -5 p.iti. 
; (Eiotpt holidays) 




BULLETIN 

BOARD 




ADVANCED FLIGHT 
Training. Murti engine 
mse/ument, commercial. 
ATP, CFi rating*. 
Private And inttrument 
ground school. 
Hugh Irvm at 539 3128 
evenings. 

ATTENTION LADIESI Take 
time to schedule a 
free Mary Kay faciall 
Mary Kay it a top- 
line *kin care program. 
Invite some friends. 
It's double the funll 
CaN Kerta Matson at 
539- 4342. 

COME FLY with us. K Slate 
Flying Club has 
five airplanes. For best 
prices call Sam 
Krtipp, 539 6193 after 
5:30p.m. 

SHYNESS WORKSHOP Is 
shyness inhibiting 
you? Five- session 
workshop will teach 
skills of overcoming 
shyness. Mondays 
3:30- 5p.m. beginning 
September 14. Fee: 
$10. Call University 
Counseling Services at 
532-6927 to reserve a 
place. 

SMART ONE day diet' Rid 
IS to 20 pounds 
in 30 quick days. Enjoy 
summerl 'Free 

Samples' 18001395- 39?8 



f ^ 

JOIN THE 
KANSAS STATE UNIV. 
ROWING TEAM 



HAVE FUN 

AND GET IN SHAPE' 

INFORMATION 

MEETING: 

THURS. AUG. 27, 1992 

7 PM 

DEN1SONR.M 113 Ay 



^ 



Lett and Found 




Only found ads can ba 
placed free ol 



LOST FEMALE ferret around 
tha vicinity of 
Sctth and Fremont She 
needs special 

care. Please call 776- 
1326 



vt 




Me iaquira a form of 
picture ID (KSU or 



n placing a 



SBM 28, 6' 179 pounds. 

would like to meet a 
nice lady, 23 to 37 tor 
romance and to- 
getherness Reply 
Collegian Box 1 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 




A HOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 
campus. Central air and 
heating $600 537-0428. 

AIR CONDITIONED, very 

clean one, two, 
three-bedroom units. 
Furnished or unfur- 
nished. Quiet 
surroundings for serious 
students. Nine month 
lease available. No pets. 
537 8389 

CLOSE TO campus very 
nice, one, two, 
three and four- 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great prices. 

537-2919, 537-1666 

NEWLY fCMODELED three- 
bedroom, two 

bath, one-half block 
from campus. No 
pets. 776-1340. 



110 



API- 



CLOSE TO campus very 
nice, one, two, 
three and four- 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great prices. 

537-2919. 537-1666 

FOUR-BEOROOM, TWO 
bath, central air, 
laundry, near campus. 
537-8800. 

LARGE TWO BEDROOM 
west side location. 
Pool, central air, 
dishwasher, activities. 
Available now $449. 
539-7489 

SPACIOUS, VERY clean two- 
three bedroom, 
two bath, air 
conditioned, laundry 
hook- 
ups. Waterbeds 
accepted Quiet 
surround- 
ings for serious 
students. No pets. Also 
one 

and two bedroom units. 
537-8389 



WANTED 

Students looking for 
living accommodations 
with their own 
bedroom.ln unit 
amenities include: 
*0ii/ma$/icr 
i Mioowi res 
tWishm&Drym 
Complex also includes: 
'Hot Tubs 
* Sind Yolk) bill Courts 

As low as: 
J195/monthpef person 
Call for an appointment 





OWN ROOM in a new 
house, $200 a month 
plus one-fourth utilities. 
Call Craig at 776- 
6573. 




A HOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 
campus. Central air and 
heating $600 537-042& 

TWO- BEDROOM HOUSE, 
two and one-half 
mitea from Town Center 
on Highway 24. 
776-1340 




MALE NEXT to campus/ 

Aggieville. $175. 
537-0289 

NON SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate lo share 
two bedroom duplex. 
Call 776-0402. 



ONE NON-SMOKING 
female. $134 per 

month plus one-fourth 
utilities. One and 
one-hall blocks from 
campus. 776-2076. 

ONE- THREE non-smoking 
females, farm- 

house, barn, pasture 
for horses, cattle, 
dogs. Prefer Vetennary. 
Animal Science. 
Horticulture majors. 
Possible rent in ex- 
change for horse 
training or light cattle 
and 

horse chores. 776- 1 706, 
8pm- 9pm or P. 
O. Box 1211. 

OPENING FOR two mala 
student roommates 
m a three- bedroom, one 
and one half 

bath apartment in a 
complex 537-7087 
or 637-2470. 

ROOMMATE WANTED to 

share three-bad 
room, own room, $1 16/ 
month plus one- 
eighth utilities. 537- 
9379. 



SERIOUS. NON-SMOKING 
female roommate 
to share a one-bedroom 
apartment partially 
furnished. Call 539-7586. 

THREE-BEDROOM ON 
Hillcrest with two oth- 
ers, walking distance 
KSU. Laundry 

facilities, garage $235/ 
month. Leave 

message with Karen 
5397*95 

TWO ROOMMATES needed 
immediately 
Four- bedroom house, 
one block from 
campus, own room, 
$175 plus One-fourth 

utUAie*. Travis 776-9319 
leave mes 




SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



205 



TUTORING HELP available 
for math, physics, 
and FORTRAN 

programming. Call 
Chetan 
at 537 1539, 



210 



TTthxj 



A FIVE minute walk from 
Aggieville. Pa- 

pers, letters $1.25 
double spaced. Same 
day slightly higher. Ask 
about resumes. 
Call 776-1534. 



225 



Tttttng 



Pregnant^ 
Ti'siinij Center 

539-3338 

■hu [Hi ■.•ii.iik*. 

1 1 villi'.' 
■ I 'l.llh (.-•»!! lull <lll.ll 



tMHtptts Ml 

Vdik'fxin XilLiL'i 



Mon.-Fri. 

L > a.m. -5 p.m. 



235 



CMs Can 



DEPENDABLE. NON- 
SMOKER needed to 
care for five year old 
after kindergarten, 
and eight year old attar 
school in my 



home., located near 
Amanda Arnold. Must 
have child care 
experience and own 
trans- 
portation. References 
required. Hours will 
be 11:20am 5:30pm.. 
Monday- Friday. 
Please call 537-7354 
after 5:30p.m. for 
more information. 




MUSICIANS: RHYTHM 
guitar, keyboard, fid- 
dle, and steel players 
needed for an es- 
tablished country band, 
5397265 or 587- 
0384 

WANTED ALTERNATES for 
(doo- wop) vocal 
group. Need first tenor 
with high falsetto 
and low bass. Perform 
around state, even- 
ings and weekends 
Good pay 776-4999. 
5371741 



255 



A LITTLE extra cash for a 
chemistry text and a 

pitcher of beer. Cash 
Pawn &Gun, Inc.. 
1917 Ft Riley Boutevard. 

HEALTH AND Auto 
Insurance. Call us be- 
fore buying the 
University Health Plan 
Murit- line Agency 555 
Poynti Suite 

215. Tim Engle 
537-4661 




EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 




Tha Collegian cannot 



tontial of 

advertisement* in 
tha Employment 

classification 



to ap- 

proach any such 
employment 
opportunity 
with reasonable 
caution. Tha 



urges our readers to 
contact the tetter 

SE Jefferson. Tope 
ka.KSM<B07-119O 
(913)232-0454 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

ASSISTANT with execu- 
tive secretary 
responsibilities. Full- 
time. 

Typing proficiency, 
Macintosh computer 
proficiency required. 
Apply in person 
with resume. Sager 
Dental Associates 
PA 514 Humboldt. 

BABYSITTER NEEDED for 
two children in my 
home. Prefer live-in. 
Must have time Avail- 
able from 6a. m to 
7:46a.m. and 3p.m. to 
6p.m. Monday Friday. 
Some nights and 
weekends needed. 
Prefer college girl with 
rural background. Must 
bo absolutely de- 
pendabtel Need reliable 
transportation, ex- 
cellent driving record, 
non-smoker. Must 
enjoy children and have 
previous experi- 
ence. References 
required. Call 776-01*0 
before 9p.m. and leave 



CHILDCARE PROVIDER/ 
teacher aide for 
weekday church 
program involving inf- 
antx through preschool- 
age children. 
Must be available 8.30 
to noon on Thurs- 
day mornings. Potential 
for additional 
hours. Childcare 
experience and refer- 
ences required. Apply 
by August 31 ai 
the First United 



Methodist Church, 6th 
and Poyntz. 

CHILDCHILLV NANNIES east 
coast nannies. 

NY, Conn., Long Island. 
and NJ areas. 
Live-in one year 
commitments $150 and 
up per week. Immediate 
placements. In- 

terviews and 

applications call 

18001858-2429. 

COMPUTER SUPPORT and 
Prog ramming p o 
sit ons are available for 
K State students 
with a variety of skills 
Support Technicians 
must have good 
inlBr,jersorial skitta. have 
experience with PCs 
and popular software 
packages like 

WordPerfect. Lotus, 
dBase. 

Must have a firm 
understanding of 
MStiDS, and Windows, 
and have some 
programming skills. 
Software Developers 
and Network Assistants 
must have ex 
perience with C/C**. 
data based man 
agement systems iSQL 
dBase, Paradoxl 
and with Novell. UNIX. 
MS-DOS. and Wind- 
ows. GUI programming 
experience in X or 
Windows 3.1 is 
especially helpful. 
Applica- 
tions will be available/ 
accepted until 

9/TS2at211Umberger 
Hall. 

HELP WANTED Translators 
for French, Ger- 
man. Spanish. Chinese 
Must be here until 
February 1. 1993 Call 
Pam Fulmar at the 
International Trade 
Institute. 532-6799 for 
interview. 

HOUSE HELPER needed for 
single mom four 
five hours a week for 
laundry, cleaning. 
and errands Salary and 
hours negotiable 
Must be absolutely 
reliable. Must have 
laundry and cleaning 
experience. Prefer 
college girl with rural 
background. Refer 
encei required. Call 
776 0140 before 
9p.m. and leave 
message. 

LEAD TEACHER for 
nationally accredited 

early childhood 

program, the successful 
candidate will have a 
four year degree in 
the educational field 
preferably early 
childhood education. 
Individuals must 
have experience 
teaching young child- 
ren in group situations. 
Please send re- 
sume with cover letter, 
college wan 

scnpts and three names 
of references to 
Marsha Tannehill, 
Seven Dolors Child- 
care/ Pre- school. 220 
S. Juliette by 

•apt*. 

LOOKING FOR advertising, 
public relations, 
or business major 
interested in being 
classified student 
advertising manager 
for the Kansas State 
Collegian adver 
tising department. Must 
have a flexible 
schedule, be able to 
work at least 3- 4 
hours per day. and have 
excellent tele- 

phone skills. For 
Applications and further 
information contact 
Annette or Gloria at 
532-6660. 

MANHATTAN FLORAL is 
accepting appli- 
cations for a full-time, 
year round secre 
tarial position. Apply 
in person at 630 
Poyno Ave. 

NATIONAL PUBLISHING 
company is seek 
ing marketing personnel 
to work with pro- 
fessors and course 
instructors at Kan- 
sas State University. 
Position will re- 

auire 2- 3 hours per 
ay. Must have 
strong customer 
support and interna- 
tional skills. Base pay 
and training are 
provided. Please send 
your resume to, 
CAP. P O Box 26340. 
Oklahoma City. 
OK 73126 

OFFICE ASSISTANT, must 
be flexible, have 
a pleasing personality 
when dealing with 
the public and have 
some experience 
with small office 



procedures and com- 

guters. Apply At Seven 
olors Childcare. 
Preschool, 220 S. 
Juliette, through Aug 
26. EOE 

PART- TIME Programmer/ 
Clerical help want- 
ed 115- 20 hours;' week. 
$4.55- $4.75/ hour 
depending on 

experience) 60 percent 
of 

duties will be 
programming: Writing/ 
main- 
taining PC- based 
programs and mam 
te nance of PC systems 
including installa- 
tion/ updating 
commercial software 
40 

percent of duties wilt 
be clerical: Data en- 
try, operation of optical 
scanner and print- 
er, filing orders, word 
processing (Word- 
Perfect), typing, 
proofing, and some 
heavy 

lifting. Important: 
Applicants must be able 
to work full ome during 
all school breaks, 
including summer 
Work Study preferred 
but not required. 
Applications available 
from the Center for 
Faculty Evaluation ft 
Development, College 

Court Building, 

room 161 

PART-TIME HELP needed 
mornings, after- 
noons and evenings. 
Apply in person 
8530 East Highway 24 

PART TIME HELP on 
commercial hog. cat- 
tle and crop farm, 25 
mites northeast of 
Manhattan. Travel 
allowance given 
Farm experience 
helpful Must have at 
least Fn afternoons 
available. Call 

457-3440 before 8a.m. 

PART-TIME MASSAGE 
Therapist 10 to 12 
hours per week. 
Afternoons. Will train. 
Therapeutic Massage 
776V0022, 

POSITION AVAILABLE 
immediately at Shop 
Quik. Midnight shift 
$4.50/ hour, 4- mid 
night or 3- 11 shift 
$4 .25/ hour part-time. 
2- 3 nights to start. 
Register experience 
preferred. Apply in 
person 11 15 West- 
port Suite B, 

RILEY COUNTY Extension 
Assistant to con 
duct a youth Alcohol 
Abuse education pro- 
gram during after 
school hours. Position 
il 

available September 
1992 May. 1993. 
and involves 150 hours 
per semester at $5 
per hour Some work 
hours may be flexi- 
ble, but applicant must 
be available Mon- 
day- Thursday 
afternoons. At 
minimum, 

position requires a high 
school diploma or 
equivalent, two years 
working experience, 
dasire and ability to 
work with youth, good 
verbal and written 
communication skills, 
and organizational <sM1s. 
Applicant must 

have own 

transportation, mileage 
will be 

reimbursed. Training 
and supervision will 
be provided. Complete 
written application 
and submit with three 
references to Riley 
County Extension Office. 
110 Courthouse 
Plaza. Manhattan, KS 
by August 26. 1992 
Funding in part 
provided by the City of 
Manhattan. EOE. 

STUDENT COMPUTER 
Consultant, 15- 20 
hours per week, to start 
as soon as possi- 
ble, as a consultant for 
faculty, staff, and 
students. Selection 
criteria will be a com- 
bination Of paid work 
experience. Micro- 
computer, mainframe, 
and UNIX knowl- 
edge, grade point 
average, and longevity 
potential. Application* 
will be accepted by 
Joyce Henderson, 
Room 26. Cardwell 
Hall, through August 
31. EOE 

VAN DRIVER: part time 
position available im- 
mediately Hours 
Monday Friday 7- Sam 
and 3- Sp.m. 
Responsible for 
transporting 



clients to and from Day 
Treatment Pro- 

gram CDL required 
Contact CSP Super- 
visor, Pawnee Mental 
Health Services 
Phone 587-4333 

VISTA DRIVE-IN is now 
taking applications 
for full and part-time 
help. Apply in per 
son at 1911 Turtle Creek 
Btvd. 



330 



The Collegian cannot 
verity the financial 
po- 
tential of 
advertisements in 
the Employment 
classification. 
RawSare are advised 
to ap- 
proach any such 
employment 
opportunity 
with reasonable 
caution. Tha 
Collegian 

urges our readers to 
contact tha Batter 
Buasnese Bureau. SOI 
SE Jefferson. Tope 
ka. KS 66607-1190 
9)31232-0454 

$200- $500 weekly Assemble 
products at 

home. Easy I No selling 
You're paid di- 
rect. Fully guaranteed 
Free informs 

lion — 24 hour hotline 
801 379-2900. 
Copyright AKS13KDH 

ALASKA SUMMER 

employment— fisheries. 
Earn $5,000 plus/ 
month. Free transpor 
tationl Room and 
board! Over 8.000 
openings. No 

experience necessary 
Male or female. For 
employment program 

call Student 

Employment Services at 

1- 

2065454155 ext. 

A5768 

POST ADVERTISING 
materials on campus. 
Write: College 

Distributors. 33 Pebble 

wood Trail, Naperville. 

Illinois 60563. 



WOW' RAISE $500- 1000 
IN JUST ONE WEEK! 



For your frai, 
sorority, club, cic. 

Assist Marketing Firm 

running fun event on 

campus for Fortune 

500 Companies 

FREE 

HEADPHONE RADIO 

just for railing 
l-WW.950-1037,cxL25 




OPEN 

MARKET 



410 



kri 



CARPET FOR dorm room. 
Gray, used one 

rr. $50 Call 539-9700. 
S Monday- Fri- 
day. 

CARPET: 8" x 12' light blue. 
One year old. For 
more information, call 
776-1389. 

OfiAFTING EQUIPMENT for 
sale. For more in- 



formation call Angela 
776-2447 

ENTERTAINMENT SET with 
CD player and 
dual cassette player. 
Comes with detach- 
able speakers. $275. 
539 4319 

FOUR- CUBIC foot 
refrigerator for sale. Ex- 
cellent condition. $90. 
Call 776 -4266. 

FUTON FULL size, frame 
$90. matress $50. 
Call Martina 537-2473, 
7p.m. - 10pm. 

LOOK 3X5' metal desks 
formica tops, five 
drawers, tor sale. Call 
776-1700 or 

539-5046. leave 
message. 



AGGIES NEW TO YOU 
Second Hand Store 

537-8803 

MM 4a 14 lii^u KM I am 



TOPEKA DAILY Capital 
Semester Special 776- 
1552 



415 



Furniture to 
■uy/Sail 



FOR SALE full size hide-a- 
bed. Dark brown. 
539-7868. leave 

message. 

FOR SALE: Table lamp, five- 
shelt bookcase, 
dub chair, swivel rocker, 
bedroom chair, 

black fireplace tools. 
Franklin fireplace- 
uses wood or gas, 87 
piece dishes 467 
3722 

GREEN AND white couch 
$50. two green 
swivel chairs 55 a piece 
539-6896 

NICE. COMFORTABLE 
couch. 7 feet long, 
$100 Call, leave 
message, 537-1783 or 
5326170. 

TWIN BED for sale. 
Complete. S75 or best 
off- 
er. Call 776-5582 and 
leave message 

TWO KING- size waterbeds, 
$75 each 

Small dormitory 
refrigerator, $66 or best 
offer. Schwinn Impact 
Pro, 21 inches, 
$400. 539-8762 

WOHLER'S USED Furniture, 
615 North 3rd. 
539-3119. Open 10a.m. 
6pm Monday- 

Friday; until Bp.m. 
Thursdays: Saturday- 
Sunday 1- 5p.m. 



Wohler's 
U»ed Furniture 

Open M-F 10-6 

Thursdays til 8pm 

Sat & Sun 1-5 pm 

615 N. 3rd 539-3119 



420- 



eertaa.Tirf 



WE DON'T have rooml 
Many items like new. 
B'k13' blue carpet, 
appliances, full-sized 
bed, couch, chair, ptasbc 
crates, com- 

pact vacuums, phones, 
coolers. drawing 
paper, tile folders, 
curtains and much 
more. Call 776-7573 for 
more informa- 

tion. 



435 



AT4T PC 6300 computer, 
IBM compatible, 
30mb hard disk, 3.5" & 
5.25* disk drives, 
color monitor, $250 
Call 539 7956 



Pets and 




INTERESTED IN owning a 
pet. but cats and 
dogs aren't allowed? 
Get a rabbit, they 
are a great substitute 
Call 539-7 128 

SAVE $86 on a 55- gallon 
aquarium w/ hood 
and f!uoresr%nt lights. 
Complete set up for 
$259 99. Pets- n -Stuff. 
1105 Waters. 539- 
9494 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 




SOLOFLEX COMPLETE. Like 
new $750. 

537-7675 latter 

5:30p.m. I 




1976 DODGE Dart 71,000 
miles. Runs well 
$1000 or best offer call 
539-8333 

1978 IMPALA 350 
transmission. Best offer 
Call 539 2453 before 
11a.m. or after 
6p.m. 

CHEAPI FBI/ US sened 
1969 Mercedes 

S200. 1986 VW $50. 
1987 Mercedes 

$100, 1965 Mustang 
$50. Choose from 
thousands starting $25 
Free information 
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12- SPEED Eine tour bicycte- 
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Shimeno 105. Call 
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TWO 20- inch ten- speed 
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WOMEN'S 10- speed; 21* 
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Condition. $90 776- 
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1992 ZX7 Ninja. Showroom 
condition match 
ing cover, helmet 700* 



Classified Directory 




irjfe 



SERVICE ■ EMPLOY 
DIRECT- HMENT 

om I career: 







•f 2 August 25, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




My Mom, jhe -thinks all I eyer do if 90 
fhrou^n pto/e*.' *You changed your major 

again ? A/ow if '$ (ihhic fence Forw?vfhet) 

are you going +0 come to your fer\fe$ ahd 
guetf \ti Jvti Another pftafc.'fo JWd Aer, 

v G«Ve me a kreak Ma. I mean I fcepf Me 

Tame phone company a// ^ur year/.'.. 

SKe wa* fmpretfed." 




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C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 




WEDNESDAY 



I Local triatbleta prepare for the 



Sept. 12 event. 

*mmmmmm 



PAGE 6 




HIGH , LOW 



WEATHER - PAGE 2 



AUGUST 26, 1992 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99, NUMBER 3 




UNIVERSITY 



Booklog 

Students make their way through the cashier lines after gathering all the books they need for the semester at Vamey's Book Store Tuesday afternoon 



SHAMS KKYSCR C : i«g*n 



Shining 
review 
for KSU 



MEGAN MULL I KIN 

(olkfian 

K-5tate has been reacciedited for 10 more 
\ears by the Commission of Institutions of 
Higher Education of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Schools. 

Man in Jischke, accreditation team leader and 
president of Iowa State University, said the team 
looks for a well-understood mission, adequate 
resources jnd an expectation to continue to 
accomplish its purposes. He said K-State 
satisfied all the criteria 

"One of the more imprecise things at Kansas 
State University was the extent to which the 
students genuinely believed thes were Retting 
the kind of education they deserved, " Jischke 
said. "It was really refreshing, and it speaks very 
highly of the University." 

The eight-member learn reviewed articles 
about K-State first, then spent three days on 
campus last spring to make the evaluation. 
Jischke said on the third day. K-State President 
Jon Wefald received a preliminary report 
highlighting the main points of the visit. He 
received the final analysis this month 

Wefald said he thought the University would 
get a good report but he couldn't believe how 
positive it was. 

Good attitudes of students, faculty and 
administration were what made the report 
outstanding. Wefald said 

"We have people with caring attitudes." he 
said. "We try and listen to the students and 
faculty and we never take anything for granted. 
The report described K-State as having 

■ See ACCREDITATION page 7A 



HURRICANE ANDREW 



Louisiana 
latest to be 
storm-lashed 



140-mph winds 

strike coastline, 
spawn tornado 

A— OWATTO >MII 

NEW ORLEANS — Hurricane 
Andrew, already labeled the 
costliest storm in the nation's 
history, raked the Louisiana 
coastline with 140-mph winds 
Tuesday. 

Residents, roused by scenes of 
destruction the day before in 
southern Florida, had boarded up 
and fled. 

The storm, blamed for the deaths 
of at least 17 people in Florida and 
the Bahamas, was estimated to have 
caused $15 billion to $20 billion in 
damages in south Florida. If those 
preliminary figures hold up. it 
would be by far the most expensive 
natural disaster ever in the United 
States. 

Andrew began lashing coastal 
parishes by nightfall. Bob Sheets, 
director of the National Hurricane 
Center, said the doughnut-shaped 
wall of the storm around the eye 
had struck the marshy coasttand, 
with 140-mph winds, shortly before 
10 p.m. 

Grand Isle, Louisiana's only 
inhabited barrier island, was 
completely under water, officials 
said. 

A tornado in LaPlace, west of 
New Orleans, destroyed four 
houses and caused serious injuries 
to an unknown number of people 
inside, said state police Capt. 
Ronnie Jones. The twister also 
heavily damaged a doctor's office 
next to a hospital hut didn't hit the 
hospital, Jones said. 

Earlier, hurricane-force winds 
above 74 mph prevented sheriffs 
deputies from responding to rescue 
caits from a stranded 60- foot boat 
and stalled cars in Terrebonne 



LOUISIANA 
COAST 




PATH OF 
STORM 



QORY A 

Collegian 



Parish south of New Orleans, even 
though the storm's eye was still 
about 40 miles offshore, said civil 
defense coordinator Morris 

I) up I a lit is 

Lockport, east of Terrebonne 
Parish, lost power at 7: 1 5 p.m. amid 
reports of lOO-mph wind gusts. 

"We've got trees in the road and 
power outages all over the place. 
We've got 2,700 people in shelters 
and more out looking for shelters." 
Lafourche Parish sheriff's Maj, 
Sonny Hanson said. 

A turn to the north late Tuesday 
meant New Orleans could expect 
lOO-mph winds and more of the 
hurricane than previously 
forecasted, according to the 
National Hurricane Center. But the 
city still was expected to be spared 
a direct hit as the storm moved 
farther west toward low-lying 
Cajun country. 

The eye, moving just off the 
coast, was headed for Morgan City, 
an oil town virtually deserted 
during the day. 

"This swath of damage is going 

■ s..-c ANDREW page 8A 



Enrollment levels off 



SHAWN ftftUCC 



CoNcfim 

K State enrollment figures will 
remain stable for the 1992 fall 
semester, white other regent schools 
fluctuated, .University officials said 
Tuesday. 

Total anticipated enrollment at 
K-State, including the College of 
Technology in Salina, is expected to 
be about 2 1 ,500 students. 

University Registrar Don Foster 
said 17.998 students had registered 
at K-State as of Aug. 2 1 , the end of 
fee payment. That represents an 
increase of only 29 students 
compared to fall 1991. 

Late enrollment is expected to 



push the figure on the Manhattan 
campus to about 20,600 students. 

Enrollment on the Salina 
campus is 663 students, compared 
to 619 last year. Late enrollment is 
expected to push that figure to 
between 800 and 900 students. 

Total enrollment on both 
campuses for fall 1991 was 21,507 
students. 

At Wichita State University, 
enrollment was down 2.9 percent 
from last year. On Monday, 14,447 
students were enrolled, compared to 
1 4.882 one year ago. 

This marked the fourth year in a 
■ See SCHOOLS page 8A 



K-STATE 

ENROLLMENT 



estimate — fall. 
500 students 




■ Enrollment 

increased by 
only 29 
students 
over last 



16.000 



87 88 89 90 

FALL ENROLLMENTS BY YEAR 



State grants adjustment 



loJtrgun 

Despite an influx of $1.69 million in 
enrollment adjustment funds for 1992. 
University officials arc continuing wilh 
plans to stabilize future enrollment. 

Pat Bosco, vice president for 
institutional advancement, said keeping 
enrollment at about 20,000 students is 
key to the future of K-State, at least 
until the state Legislature budgets more 
money for higher education. 

"We've realized that we're dealing 
in a period of time in our state where 
funding is somewhat uncertain," he 
said. "In many areas, we're about 



maxed out. We've reached critical 
mass." 

The problem, Bosco said, is that 
despite coming through with 
enrollment-adjustment money for this 
year, the Legislature has failed to 
deliver all that was promised in 
previous years. 

**I personally feel very betrayed." 
Bosco said. "Six years ago, we had a 
very carefully drafted plan that 
included enrollment-adjustment money 
We have received a percentage of our 
enrollment-adjustment money, but 
unfortunately we haven't received the 
whole amount." 



As a result. Bosco said. University 
officials have been trying to meet an 
increasing enrollment with fewer 
resources 

Bill Feyerharm, assistant dean of 
arts and sciences, said most students 
have seen the results of the budget 
crunch in closed class sections. 

"We had 80 to 100 students on a 
waiting list for chemistry," he said. "I 
don't know how many of them finally 
goi in." 

Feyerharm said students were 
having problems adding classes in 
other areas as well, especially in the 

■ See CLASSES page 8A 



NEWS DIGEST 



►ARK CITY MAN SENTENCED IN RAPE ►3RD DEATH IN CAMPUS SHOOTING 



WINF1ELD <AP> — An 
Arkansas City man convicted of 
raping a severely retarded state 
hospital patient has been 
sentenced to S- 1 years in 
prison 

Cowley County District Judge 
Robert Bishop sentenced Jeffrey 
Walker, 21, Monday. 




Walker's arrest began after the 

staff at Wtnfteld State Hospital 
and Training Center discovered 
a patient who was six months 



The investigation that led to pregnant. 



MONTREAL (AP) — A 
third professor gunned down in 
a Concordia University 
shooting rampage died 
Tuesday. 

The latest victim was Jann 
Saber, 46, an associate 
professor of mechanical 
engineering. Another professor 
and a secretary are 



hospitalized with wounds after 
the Monday shootings. 

Vatery Fabrikant, 52, a 
professor of mechanical 
engineering, was arraigned in 
court Tuesday on charge* 
ranging from first-degree 
murder to illegal use of a 
firearm Bail was denied. 



O A August 28, 1002 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



SOCIETY 



For you, the readers 

Society is a new Collegian section devoted to reporting ceremonies, 
parties or events that have already happened — any cause for 
celebration. 

Similar to small town society pages, this is where you d« the reporting. 
Tell us the lowdown on what happened, and let us tell everybody else. 

Look for the pink forms — like the examples printed below — outside 
Kedzie 1 1 8 next to the bulletins. Have your ID checked and drop the form 
in the bulletins box. Deadline is noon before the date of publication, and 
items will be published on a first -come, first-served basis. 

Society will appear every Wednesday on page 2. 

Society 



What It Is For 

OS 'PAST emus, parties, 

tunclion*, reunions, ceremonies 
engagements, weddings, bun is 

• and the tike 

■WUMieM* 

Fot ntwffution. ( 
Bnaly itMcits acrnny. nantu, data. 


Who It la Tor 


What It Is Not For 

'Personats 

'Announcements 


, and any formal or nlormai group you bafcjng to 
emaa m* CoaagMn rwrn aiMc* *i s:w bssti 

paKO 






' 






,1 . ■'- ' — 
1 




* 






YOUR NAME: 


YOUR PHONE f : 


TODAY S DATE: 


y 

Society 

What It la For What It la Not For 

■ PAST events , parties , 'Personals 

lunctions, reunions, ceremwae*. 'Anntmncefnenls 
engagements, weddings. Units 'Meetings 
and the like who It U Paw 

"YOU Mn raattor and any tomtal « nlgmul group you twung lo 
I ' r« mtarmalion. contact *w Coaagwn nam ttfv » *» tiiie 

ft 

\ BiM»y daacrtw a.lnrt, namav data pmim 


1 


1 


1 


1 




f 




YOUR MAMS: 


YOUR PHONE »: 


IOIIAY S ItATI 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 



Tha Kanut Stda Coaagttn (USPS 2ti 070). ■ Uuoara masMM' at Kami Saaa UFvnuMy. <s 
ouMinad try Stuoant PuMcaMni mc . Kedna Hall 103. Manhanan Kan «S06 Tha Coaaoran a 
nuotiioti awakdayi dunnfl tfva terra* yaar and onca a **ak ifirojgh r»* svumn Sacond nasi 
pofiaga u peal at Manhattan Kan 66S0! 

POSTMASTER Sam) aMraucnangas to Kansai Stat* Cota^an. C*a*«ion daak, ttadBo ' 03 
Manhattan Kan 66506-7167 

HtmtteftitMKmt •« to aotaptad by laiapnona i9U! 633 6<£6 o» at ma Octagon nawaroom. 
luMStHMlH 

inQuinat concamng local, naaonai ana aamfxc away aovar.tng mouV ba Oractad to 19' 3i 
S3J-65S5 



j POLICE REPORTS 



KSTATE POLICE 



These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the KSU Police 
Department. Because of incomplete information in the log, not alt campus 
crimes are listed here. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 25 

At 1 .1 9 p.m., a ttiart of a bicycle 
was rep or led at 1100 Fremont St. 
Loss was $433. 

RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



At 2:49 p.m., a irteft of • rear wheel 
from s bicycle at Marlatl Hall was 
reported. Loss waa $190. 



CAMPUS BULLETIN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20 



These reports are laken directly from the daily log of the Riley County 
Police Department. Because of space constraints, not all crimes appearing 
in the log are published. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 24 



At 1 :20 p.m., Kurmia Monroe. 2204 
Sloan St., reported the thtlt ot a 
puree containing $200 and an ID, 
Loss waa $250 

At 2:30 p.m., the Emergency 
Shelter, 831 Leavenworth, reported 
the thett of a 20-Inch stationary fan 



and 10 ibs, of steak. Loss was 935. 

At 3:28 p.m., J.C. Penney reported 
the thett ot a man's sweatshirt Loss 
was $48. 

At 10:10 p.m., Shelby J. Miller, 605 
Plaza Dr., Grandvlew Plaza, KS„ filed 
an aggravated battery report . 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 29 



At 3:45 a.m., a theft was reported 
at a Mini-Mart. Taken was a video 
cassette of "Rembone the Destroyer," 
Loss was $10. 

At 7:42 a.m.. Mike Daniels, 1720 
Humboldt St., reported a bat at the 
residence. It was released outside. 

At 9:37 a.m.. Charles Veatch. 1529 
Westwlnd Drive, reported a thett ot a 
titronlc training collar. Loss was $150. 

At 10:16 a.m., Becky Washington. 
1834 Laramie St., reported the thett 
and unlawful use ot a Discover card. 



Loss was $772.48. 

At 10:24 a.m., Dillons Westloop 
reported the theft of a Super Nintendo 
Game System True Golf Classics 
gams cartridge. Loss waa $216. 

At 11:08 a.m., tha Riley County 
Haalth Depart men t, 2030 Tscumssh 
Road, reported a live-animal trap 
stolen. Loss was $199. 

At 4:93 p.m.. Shannon Flsnnsgan, 
822 Fremont St., reported a theft of 
telecommunication services. Loss 
was $730. 



■ KSU Young Democrats will have an information table from 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. on the 1st floor of the Union. 

■ Computing and Network Services will sponsor a free lecture 
about using the CMS operating system on the University mainframe 
from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Cardwetl 102. 

* ■ "Law School Deadlines and Application Information* will be 
from 9:30 to 1 1 :45 a.m. in Union 204. 

■ KSU Theatre program, sponsored by UPC Eclectic 
Entertainment, will be in the Union Courtyard at noon to answer 
questions. 

■ -Responsible Dating: Know the Facts" will be from 6 to 7 p.m. 
in Derby 134. The presentation will deal with date and acquaintance 
rape, campus safety and resources for rape victims. 

■ 'Using Library Resources" demonstrations will be from 6 to 7 
p.m. in Van Ziie computer lab. 

■ ■Building Bridges* will be from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in Union 207. The 
presentation will be about the importance of diversity and culture. 
THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 aVOaaaVBWai 

■ Ag Ambassadors and Ag Reps will have a meeting for all 
continuing members at 6 p.m. in Waters 137. 

■ Al-Anon will meet from 12:05 to 1 p.m. in Lafene231. 

■ BaGals will meet at 7:30 p.m. in the UFM fireplace room. 

■ Career Planning and Placement Center will sponsor placement 
orientation meetings for seniors in agriculture at 4:30 p.m. in Waters 
231 and at 7 p.m. in Waters 244. 

■ K -State Water-Ski Team will have an informational meeting at 
8 p.m. in Union 207. 

■ Intramural manager's meeting will be at 4 p.m. in Union Little 
Theatre 



WEATHER 



YESTERDAY'S HIQHS AND LOWS 



TODAY'S FORECAST 

t^j^ | Today, mostly cloudy. Cool. A 40-percent chance of 
flak showers. Hajh 7 K ft BflUlhWII aVtrtds 10 to2C ^iDh 
j Tonight, cloudy, cool Lows 55 to 60. Chance for rain, 40 

a^BaaaaaaaaaV percent 

TOMORROW'S FORECAST 

^ ( A 40-percent chance of morning showers, then decreasing 

cloudiness m the afternoon Mild highs m the mid-70s. 



GOOOLAND 

64/50 



MANHATTAN 

73/69-% 



TOPEKA 

.85/70 



RUSSELL 

66/56 



GAR0EN CITY 

m 64/55 



WICHITA 
* 81/71 



KANS/ 
CITY 

N/A 



COFFEYVILLE j 
am 89/71 



EXTENDED FORECAST 

Friday through Sunday: Dry each day. Highs in the mid- to 
upper 70s Friday, warming mto the mid- 70s to lower 80s 
Sunday. Lows in the 50s 



WORLD TEMPERATURES 



CITY 

Aucklan d 
Budapest 



60 42 



90 79 



SKY Ho ng Konp 
cloudy j Jo'buro, 



dear 



6*41 



clear 



clear < Home 



93 68 



cear 



Caracas 



84 t-i cloudy I Toronto 



82 '62 



clear 






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17TH & ANDERSON 

(ACROSS FROM CAMPUS) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 26, 1992 3^ 



V 



■ 




Paint cycle 



CAHV COMOMftCotafjun 



CAMPAIGN *92 



Kansans sign up 
to campaign 
for Clinton/Gore 



Lwri Holland Jr. of FacllttiM Maintenance applies • frath coat of paint to the curb at 1 7th Street and College Heights Roed Monday morning. 



UNIVERSITY COUNSELING SERVICES 



Series could serve needs of students, faculty 



University offers 

weekly lunch series, 
therapy groups 



Cotoegtm 

Faculty and students seeking 
counseling can attend a new 
University Counseling Services 
weekly lunch series this semester. 

The series will be from noon to 1 
p.m. every Wednesday in the K- 
Statc Union on a walk- in basis. 

"We try to offer topics the 
students will be interested in," said 
Don Lambert, Counseling Services 
psychiatrist. "We offer topics that 



will allow students to get 
information and their questions 
answered quickly." 

Topics that have been discussed 
include dysfunctional families, 
shyness and questions you have 
always wanted to ask a psychiatrist. 

Listings for this semester's 
topics will be available Sept. 8 in 
the Union 

Counseling Services also will 
offer eight therapy groups and at 
least five workshops this year. 

Attending a therapy group costs 
$20 per semester. 

The therapy groups include 
Adult Children of Dysfunctional 
Families, Eating Disorders, Women 



in Relationships, Men in 
Relationships, General 

Relationships, and Gay and Lesbian 
Rights. 

Attending workshops costs $10 
per semester. Workshop topics 
include Anger, Shyness, 
Responsible Drinking, Students 
with Disabilities and Adult 
Children of Alcoholic Families. 

"We are hoping to have some 
workshops on stress management," 
Lambert said. "We will be having a 
new career center, which will be a 
location for workshops on career 
choices." 

Students can have five contacts 
with Counseling Services for free. 



with a cost of $8 per contact 
afterward. Students have the fiscal 
year from July 1992 to June 1993 to 
use these contacts. 

If students cannot afford these 
services, they will be referred to 
services that are provided in the 
community. 

Non-students may use 
consultation services for $40 per 
hour of consultation time. However, 
Lafene Health Center will not offer 
on- going Services. 

"I encourage everyone to call us 
for any questions," Lambert said. 
"The meeting times and places tend 
to change." 



STATS 



Stephan says new garbage law unconstitutional 



TOPEKA — A new state law 
that imposes a $25 fee on each ton 
of out-of-state garbage dumped at 
Kansas landfills is unconstitutional , 
Attorney General Bob Stephan said 



Tuesday. 

Stephan also said another pan of 
the law. enacted by the 1992 
Legislature, is unconstitutional. It 
allows counties to ban or restrict the 
disposal of out-of-state waste in 
their landfills. 



The attorney general said in a 
non-binding legal opinion that both 
provisions are "economic 
protectionist" measures that 
regulate interstate commerce. A 
clause in the first article of the U.S. 

Constitution gtvts Congress the 



sole right to regulate interstate 
commerce. 

Stephan said it is his opinion 
that a constitutional challenge 
would be successful. 



The balloons, confetti and 
speeches are in the past, but some 
effects of the Republican National 
Convention are still evident. 

Hundreds of volunteers in 
Kansas signed up to campaign for 
the Democratic presidential ticket 
of Bill Clinton and Al Gore during 
the Republican convention. 

Joel Berg, Kansans for 
Clinton/Gore press secretary, said 
several hundred people have 
volunteered to campaign, even 
though offices in Wichita and 
Topeka have been open only since 
Aug. 17. 

"A few hundred per office have 
volunteered here in Wichita and 
Topeka," Berg said. "The amount 
of people who came in was in the 
hundreds." 

Patrick Broz, Wichita 
volunteer, said the number of 
people was astounding. 

"It's incredible," Broz said. 
"Every day the number grows. I 
think we've added almost 20 
today." 

Even a number of registered 
Republicans in Wichita have signed 
up for Clinton/Gore. 

"We've had a dozen or two," 
Berg said. "The fact we arc getting 
any is remarkable 

"I think people are disgusted," 
Berg said. "It's politics as usual, 
and people want change. There was 
this whole long convention where 
they had nothing to say about 
where George Bush will lead this 
country. People don't believe what 
they have to say, especially the 
vicious and untrue things about 
Clinton and his wife." 

While people may be disgusted, 
Broz said he volunteered for a 
different reason. 

"I volunteered because I believe 
in the ticket and I'm tired of 12 
years of Reaganomics," Broz said. 
"I just graduated from WSU with a 
teaching degree. 1 sent out 100 



applications and couldn't get a job. 
It's not because I wasn't qualified 
but because there aren't any jobs in 
the teaching field. He's supposed to 
be the 



"I think 
people are 
disgusted. 
It's politics 
as usual, 
and people 



change." 

JOEL BERG 



'Education 
President.' " 

L i z 
A 1 f o rd . 
Wichita 
volunteer, 
also signed 
on for 

different 
reasons. 

"I believe 
strongly in 
what Clinton 
can do for 
the country," Alford said. "I don't 
believe Bush can lead us into the 
next century." 

Alford said the main reason 
she's for Clinton is because of his 
pro-choice position. 

"I believe in his stance of 
abortion on demand, but also that 
doesn't have to be the only 
answer," Alford said. "I do believe 
in a woman's right to choose." 

Alford said she thinks Quayle's 
abortion stance is elitist. 

"He has a possibly racist, elitist 
stance in that he believes his 
daughter has the right to choose, 
but the American public does not." 
Alford said. 

Alford is also volunteering for 
business reasons. 

"I just graduated with a master's 
degree in political science," Alford 
said. "1 believe working for the 
campaign will be advantageous." 

Broz said he believes local 
volunteers can affect the national 
campaign. 

"I think I am making a 
difference here locally, and that 
impacts the national campaign." 
Broz said. "They don't have to 
worry so much about what goes on, 
and they don't have to send anyone 
from LittJe Rock." 



WORK SMARTER. 
NOT HARDER. 



Management or 
marketing major? 
Smart. 

Finance or accounting 
student? Also smart. 

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PINION 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



The opinions expressed m In Our Opinion" an 
mentors. These views do not necessarily represent tt 
PuttfaMtorw he or tie A.Q. Meet School Of Journalism i 



» opinions o( a majority of Editorial Board 
views of Kansas State University, Studs* 



S a m an tha Branson Erin Kerry Richard Andnkfc John Han 

E Mot in Omt Amy Co* Jodell Lamer Torn Liner 

, . „ Shawn Bru« Devkj Mayo Mart Erwier 

JuredSavage Frank Kkrmajn DenATnomn David Fillipi 



Column* am tie oprtona at 

only tw osiurrrtBt They <to not 
tw view* ot tie Kanae* 
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AUGUST 26, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



In Qw Q?ppN 



fly rne Collegian Editorial Board 



Time for action in Somalia 



THE ISSUE 

The crista ki 

at' 



in 

tea 

of 



WE SUGGEST 



of the 



In America, the term "food availability* 1 
means how late the corner supermarket stays 
open. But in Somalia, it is subject to whether a 
hungry civilian has a gun. 

Upwards of 3 million Somalis will die from 
starvation during the next month. In a sick twist 
of irony, plenty of food is available. In a sicker 
twist, more aid arrives in the country's ports 
every day. 

As in Ethiopia during the drought of the 
1980s, this food aid seldom gets to the 
desperately hungry. Unlike in Ethiopia, Somalia's 
famine is not the result of drought. 

It is the result of anarchy, the noble notion 
spray-painted by 14-year-old punk rockers on the 
outside walls of supermarkets. Instead of 
government, the region is ruled by loose bands of 
14-year-old rebels with discarded Cold War guns. 

Rebels cling to the food, steal it from each 
other like alley dogs ripping at a piece of rump 
roast In the fight, the powerless starve. 

Agriculture requires stability. Only with 
assured protection of land can farmers safely 
grow crops and graze cattle. Only with a national 



economy can the product be distributed around 
the country, let alone be exported abroad 

Food aid drives the price of agriculture 
products down in surrounding countries, which 
themselves have shaky economies and 
governments, Too much aid to Somalia could 
lead to repeat performances in Ethiopia, Djibouti 
and Kenya. 

It is imperative that the Horn of Africa be 
stabilized. 

International action should not consist 
merely of care packages. Whether done through 
the United Nations or the Organization for 
African Unity, the gangs of armed eighth-graders 
need to be put down with force, allowing relief 
organizations to save some lives. 

Then, steps towards a responsible 
government and a sustainable national economy 
must be supervised to ensure peace and self- 
government. Central to this would be 
demilitarization of the region. 

It is a cruel stand. But inaction would be 
akin to genocide. It can be a cruel planet. 



SOJAEaoOV^ SOT 
TO AAAKE THE 
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IF THE ftfePi/BL/CAWs 
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Readers Write 



TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR POLICY 

We would iika to hear 
what you think Send your 
comments, criticisms and 
complaints to us 

Please include a phone 
number so we can get in 
touch witt you in case there 
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Before letters are printed 
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submitted may be edited tor 
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We cannot guarantee that 
your letter will run. but we will 
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KEDZIE HALL 116 


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COM! BY KEDZIE 1 16 OR 
THEM TO: 

Letters to the Editor 
Co Jared Savage 
Kansas State Collegian 
KedzieHall 1 is 
Manhattan. Kan 66506 



Other Viewpoints 



mm 



Jr ^PV\a# «9^*> \J ^T 



Despite freedom, discontent rules after coup 

The year since (he beginning of the coup has brought us more 
grief than joy, more problems than knowledge of how to solve them. 
In general, wc lost more than we gained in this year. Except for one 
thing — freedom. Even if it's not complete, then in any event it's 
incomparably more than we received in alt the preceding seven 
decades. -... 

Aug. 19. 1991, was the freest day in the history of modem Russia, 
because Moscow was ready to lie down in front of the tanks — to lie 
down unselfishly, simply for the idea of freedom, which is more 
important to life than any ideology. ... 

We have all been disappointed by the results of the past year. ... 
There was no manna from heaven. No golden fruit fell at our feet, 
and the bosses' chairs are not occupied by the people we dreamed of. ... 

And yet, let's once again remind ourselves: There were tanks in 
the streets of Moscow; there were gun barrels pointed at the people 
— and it failed. 

Nezavisimaya Gazeta. 
a Moscow newspaper 

► HOWS, N.M. 

Ulterior motives for appointing Baker 

President Bush evidently considers his own political fortunes 
more important than continuity in U.S. foreign policy in a time of 
global turmoil and opportunity — in the Mideast, in Bosnia, in Iraq, 
in the former Soviet bloc. How else to explain his decision to yank 
Secretary of State James Baker back to direct his re-election effort? 

Baker will be chief of staff, a position he held under former 
President Reagan. Officially, he'll be in charge of administrative 
operations, which surely could use an overhaul. 

Unofficially, though, there is little doubt that his chief assignment 
will be to salvage the Bush campaign. 

Administration officials suggest that Baker's apparently 
permanent return — along with several top aides — from the State 
Department also signals a greater emphasis on domestic issues. 
Thai's important, but must it be achieved at the expense of foreign- 
policy management? 

Republicans ... arc bubbling over Baker's "promotion" to 
defining Bush's campaign schedule and messages. The rest of the 
world likely will manage to contain its enthusiasm. 



Daily News Sun, 
Hobbs, N.M, 



► Jer us al e m 



Hussien has tittle to fear from another attack 

At most it (the West) can prevent Iraqi air action against the 
Shiites and the Kurds and rain some punishment on Iraq. But if the 
results of Desert Storm are any indication, Saddam Hussein can 
survive an air offensive with relative ease. Nor is it likely he will be 
deterred from attacking the rebellious Shiites and Kurds by threats of 
such an offensive.... 

The Jersusalem Post 



Ideas of true feminism need to be brought to light 



the (ravels from adolescence to 
f^ adulthood, we have all pushed the 
JL. J. J.English language to its vernacular 
boundaries, experimenting with those 
fabulous new words hijacked from late- 
night television or an unusually vocal 
outpouring from our parents in their 
moments of distress. 

The "f-word," as it is affectionately 
known, was generally abandoned for more 
expressive verbal tidbits. Or so I thought. 
Playgrounds grew into college campuses, 
bicycles were traded for automobiles, and 
the "f-word" became "feminist." 

Feminism is a woman-centered 
philosophy, because it is women who must 
conform to the doctrines set forth by the 
patriarchal institutions already in place. 
Being woman-centered does not make 
feminism anti-man. Nor is feminism saying 
that men don't have to play out any gender 
roles of their own. The difference is that 



men's roles are not as rigid and are not 
determined by the opposite sex. 

Feminists are often met with contempt 
and paranoia. A woman who calls herself a 
feminist is thought of as a "zany chick who 
disrupts everything," a "man-basher," or, if 
all else fails, the question of sexuality is 
used as a last resort. When one of society's 
insecurities fails, that being equality for all 
women and men. we resort to another — 
homophobia. 

People assume that you must either hate 
men or love women if you are a feminist. 
Like loving women and men are mutually 
exclusive. More importantly, as if sexuality 
and preference are even "requirements" for 
freedom. 

For these reasons, many women have 
found il difficult to label themselves 
feminist. Fewer than 25 percent of women 
identify themselves as feminist, but a great 
majority of women support the ideas that 



feminism embraces and struggles to 
promote. This lack of outward identity has 
hurt the progress and 



development of the 
women's movement. 

The fear of 
identification is only 
a product of the 
enemy. To be fearful 
of how and what 
society thinks is only 
to be fearful of 
ourselves. Our 
sexuality isn't so 
fragile that it can be 
determined or 
altered merely by 
another person's 
perceptions. 

While 
"feminism" is just a word, there is a need 
for women to identify themselves as such. 




KELLY 

Klawonn 



The more women who identify themselves 
as feminist, the more power women will 
have in redefining the word and moving 
forward with the movement. The label 
helps provide a sense of unity, identity and 
solidarity. 

All women need to speak out against the 
injustices they face on a day-to-day basis. 
Ask why there are no women tenured in 
your department. Or why there are so few 
women in the University's administration. 
And why the salary of a woman is only 70 
percent of that of a man who has the same 
qualifications and experience. 

This means going to your classes and 
questioning the absence of women in course 
material and readings. It requires asking the 
professor what role women play and what 
their contributions are. 

Demand answers to your questions. You 
have that right. 

In social and political philosophy class 



last year, the only woman studied was Ayn 
Rand. Yes, she is a woman, but what we 
read had little to do with the experience and 
the injustices faced by women in society. 
Or in a history of journalism class, the only 
women mentioned were limited to 
broadcast journalism, a field where blond 
hair and blue eyes have become a 
benchmark of what a woman is within the 
field. 

To study a woman's writings is not 
enough. We need to study the woman's 
experience and perspective. We need to 
resist the ways of thinking and the material 
that wc are taught. 

Now, don't be fooled. There are plenty 
of women who have made significant 
contributions in all areas of study, but their 
stories have either been lost or ignored. It is 
our job to locate and demand that these 
women arc given equal time and 
consideration. 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 26, 1992 g^ 









: .* . 



Expansion, renovation of Rec Complex to begin 



Construction about 

seven months away 



Colkfiui 

The days of fighting the crowd 
and the long wait to use equipment 
at the Chester E. Peters Recreation 
Complex are limited. 

The reality of an expanded Rec 
Complex came one step closer Aug. 
18 with the selection of an 
architectural firm. The Ken Ebert 



Design Group of Manhattan was 
chosen to design and plan the 
expansion. 

"It was the best news I received 
for the day — for the week for that 
matter." said Robert Westberg, 
project manager of this project and 
architect with TKEDG, 

The project will include adding 
four basketball/volleyball courts, a 
larger weight and fitness room, an 



aerobic/multi-activity room, a 
longer elevated running track, more 
administration offices and air 
conditioning for the entire building. 

Renovations will also take place. 
The current weight room will be 
converted into a table tennis room, 
and the gym and racquctball floors 
will be re-surfaced. 

Outside, the tennis, racquetball 
and basketball courts will be 
resurfaced, and new lighting of the 
playing fields is included. 

In November 1991, students 
approved the Rec Complex 
referendum by 81 percent. Funds 



previously being applied to bonds 
for the Rec Complex, KSU Stadium 
and the K-State Union were re- 
directed to be applied to fund the 
expansion, said Recreational 
Services Director Raydon Robel. 

"The expansion of the Rec 
Complex has been slow incoming," 
Robel said. "After students 
approved the Rec Complex 
referendum last Nov. 5 and 6, the 
expansion then became a project of 
the state. It had to be approved by 
the Board of Regents and both 
houses of the Kansas Legislature 
before an architect could be hired." 



The expansion was approved by 
the regents in December and by the 
Legislature in late May, Robel said 
In June, the state advertised for 
architectural firms and developed a 
list of the top five contenders. 

The contenders were then 
interviewed and voted on by K 
State representatives, the regents, 
and the state Division of 
Architecture Services. Student 
Body President Jackie McClaskey 
represented the students' vote. 

"We were selected based on our 
qualifications and our interview," 
Westberg said. "Having someone 



qualified and close was important to 
this project from the beginning. We 
have been involved prior to this 
We were contacted two years ugo 
by the University to develop a 
possible plan for the expansion of 
the complex." 

Robel said groundbreaking and 
construction of the complex is Kill 
about seven months away. During 
that time, TKEDG will proceed 
with designing and planning. 

Currently. TKEDG has a rough 
idea of what the building will look 

■ Sec EXPANSION page 7A 



CAMPUS 



KSU Foundation helps fund 

expansion of Throckmorton 



Collriun 

The first step toward private 
funding of the Throckmorton Hall 
expansion was put in place by the 
KSU Foundation. 

Kansas Association of Wheat 
Growers made a pledge Aug. 10 to 
raise at least $50,000 as a lead gift 
through their membership. 

Construction on Phase II of 
Throckmorton began this spring, 
said George Ham, associate dean of 
the College of Agriculture and 

WORLD 



expansion project coordinator. 

"Private funds will form a fourth 
of the total funding," said Ham. 
"We are working with the KSU 
Foundation to raise these." 

The federal government and the 
state of Kansas each finance a 
fourth of the funds. 

Betty Johnson, constituent 
development officer of the KSU 
Foundation Center, said this was 
the first gift actually solicited by (he 
Foundation. 

"We hope to have the $S million 



needed through private funds 
pledged and committed by fall 
1994, but realistically it may take 
longer." Johnson said. 

"The two new wings will largely 
house research facilities, as the 
teaching needs were pretty well 
satisfied in Phase 1 in fall 1981." 
Ham said 

The three departments that will 
be housed in Throckmorton after 
Phase II completion include 
Horticulture, Forestry and 
Recreation Resources: Agronomy 



and Plant Pathology. 

The greenhouses attached to 
Throckmorton are a part of Phase U 
that has already been completed. 
The two wings (east and west) will 
almost triple the size of the building 
to a total of 1 6 1 ,000 square feet, 
and will house offices, classrooms 
and research laboratories. 

"We expect to occupy the 
building in the summer or fall 
1994," Ham said. "While the 
contractors were ahead of schedule, 
the rain this year delayed work." 



! 




Be A living Legend 

at 



Thousands pay to 
hear 'Squidgy' tape 



AMQCUTiP mn 

LONDON— Thousands of 
people paid up to $22 Tuesday to 
be titillated telephonically by a 
recording of an unidentified man's 
conversation with a woman who 
may or may not be Princess Diana. 

Transcripts of the tape that have 
appeared in tabloid newspapers 
since Sunday identify (he woman 
only as "Squidgy," a pet name 
used by the man. 

But several bits of the 
conversation hint it might be Diana: 
The woman talks to a child named 
Harry, and she talks about Fergie 
— the Duchess of York — and the 
royal residence at Sandringham, 
and about her unhappy marriage. 

Buckingham Palace said the tape 
was "inconclusive in terms of 
voice quality." 

The Sun. the tabloid which 
published extensive transcripts 
Monday and Tuesday, made the 
whole tape available by telephone, 
charging 95 cents a minute. 

The newspaper reported more 
than 20.000 calls by late afternoon, 
averaging about five minutes per 
call. Listening to the entire 
conversation would cost about $22. 



A story in Tuesday's Sun said a 
ham radio operator, Cyril Reenan, 
made the tape from an intercepted 
car phone conversation on New 
Year's Eve, 1989. and that Reenan 
turned it over to the newspaper. 

"There's no way I want to harm 
royalty," The Sun quoted him as 
saying. 

The tape is mostly rambling 
conversations and no proper names 
are exchanged. 




Attention Students 

Students are to submit any change 

of name and /or address to the 

Registrar's Office, Anderson 118, 

no later than 9/3/92. Grade 

reports are mailed to student's 

permanent address as recorded in 

the Registrar's Office. 




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August 26, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



ACADEMICS 



; •:■+(■• ; j. - ■ . ■' ' :< 



Student's experiment to go aboard space shuttle 



woYoima 

Collegian 

Richard Brian Hilgcnfcld sees 
space travel in his future. 

Hilgenfeld, senior in pre 
medicine and biochemistry, has 
spent much of the past year doing 
experimental research with Rob 
Dencll, professor of biology. Their 
combined research is based on the 
effect of gravitational changes on 
fruit-fly embryos. 

Hilgenfeld said experimentation 
with fruit flies has merited a $5 
million grant from NASA's 
Specialized Center of Research and 
Training for ground-based research. 

"I was just looking for work in a 
lab, so I talked to Rob and told him 
what I wanted to do," Hilgenfeld 
said. "He found something for me 
and said, 'Here it is. Go with it' 1 
wouldn't exactly call it a job, even 
though I get paid some money from 
the gram. I'd probably say it is 
more of an opportunity,'' 



Hilgenfeld's new opportunity 
expanded when he was selected by 
his Public Speaking I class to give 
his research presentation at the 
public speaking contest in Nichols 
Hall. 

Hilgenfeld also had portions of 
his research published in 
Transactions of the Kansas 
Academy of Science. 

Hilgenfeld, a Golden Key 
National Honor Society member, 
used his presentation research to 
earn credentials in the society, 
which has more than 10,000 
members. 

He was one of three students 
selected nationwide to participate in 
the Student Scholastic Showcase 
during the annual Golden Key 
Convention in Scottsdale, Ariz., this 
summer. 

The showcase is not a contest 
but a tribute to students who have 
had either published or honored 
work. Each of the three speakers 



received a $500 scholarship. 

Willard Nelson, K -State Golden 
Key adviser, introduced Hilgenfeld 
to the convention. 

"This was a real honor for 
Richard, and it was also a real 
honor for K-State," Nelson said. 
"This was the first time that we had 
a K-Siate member give a speech 
there." 

Because Hilgenfeld had 
experiences giving his presentation. 



he said he was able to remain calm 
at the showcase. 

"There were people there who 
were in just about every major, so 
the most difficult thing I had to do 
was present it in a way that was 
simple enough for everyone to 
understand," he said. "1 also had to 
make it interesting for everyone, so 
1 made an analogy. I explained how 
the feeling of different levels of 
gravity in space compared to how it 




August 27 -20 10 am -4 pm 

Front U*n ol The MM Union 



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Acacia- Scpi. 8 
Alpha Chi Omega-Sept. 8-9 
Alpha Delta Pi-Sept. 9-10 
Alpha Gamma Rho-Sept. 10-1 1 
Alpha Kappa Alpha-Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Kappa Lambda-Sept. 1 1 
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Kappa Sigma-Scpt. 25 
Lambda Chi Alpha-Sept. 25 
Omega Psi Phi-Sept. 28 
Phi Beta Sigma-Sept. 28 
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Phi Gamma Delta- Sept. 29 
Phi Kappa Tau-Scpt. 29 



Phi Kappa Theta-Scpt. 28 
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Sigma Alpha Epsilon-Oct. 1 
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Sigma Kappa-Oct. 5-6 
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Sigma Sigma Sigma-Oct. 7-8 
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OffCampus-Oct. 16-30 



Picture yourself in the 1993 
Royal Purple yearbook. 



Photos will be taken from 8:30 
a.m. to noon and 1 to 530 p.m. 
in the K- State Union Room 209. 



If you arc a greek member, but 
live in a residence hall or off 
campus, please have your photo 
taken with your fraternity or so- 
rority. 



L 



felt while in the spinning barrel in 
the park." 

In December, his fruit-fly 
experiment will go into space 
aboard the space shuttle Discovery. 

"This is a really good feeling to 
be able to work in the astronaut 
program." Hilgenfeld said. "I've got 
a great avenue ahead of mc. 
However, in order to go into space, 
you've just about got to go on to get 
your Ph.D." 



Dr. Jeanne 
Klopfrnslcin 



M 



Optometrist 

Fanifl j Ej« Care 

JIM Kimball 

Candlnmod Stropping 

Outer 

776-2255 



Originally a business major. 
Hilgenfeld decided to switch to 
biochemistry and prc-medicine 
because of his varied interests. 



"Tve always been interested in 
science and was looking for a major 
of combined interest. This 
combines math, biology and 
physics, which all interest me." 



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Your Q 8 A about 



Q. How do I submit a 
news item? 

A. The Collegian welcomes any 
news tip, story or information about 
any special event. Call us at 532-6556. 
If there's time, give us a news release 
with your name, phone number and 
address. Include the who, what, 
when, where, why and how about 
your event. We don't run all releases, 
but we do publish newsworthy 
information for our student 
readership. 

Q. Whom can I talk to 
if I believe a story 
has an error? 

A. The Collegian editor is the person 
to whom you should direct questions 
and complaints about stories. Call 
532-6556. Please leave a message with 
Student Publications if editor is not 
available. 

Q. How do I submit a 
latter to the editor? 

A. The Collegian welcomes all views 
about current issues. Letters should 
be signed, with the writer's name, 
address, phone number and ID for 
verification purposes. Letters are 
edited for space, punctuation and 
grammar, but not for content. 



Q. How do I place a 
classified ad? 

A. Stop by Kedzie 103, just east of 
the K-State Union. You can sell your 
unwanted items and buy the things 
you want in the Collegian classifieds. 
We take classified ads from 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. weekdays. 

Q. How do I place a 
display ad? 

A. Come to Kedzie 118, and one of 
our advertising representatives will 
be glad to work with you on ad 
campaigns or budgets. Call 532-6560 
for more information. 



Names and numbers to call: 




Sam J nth j Branson 




Editor in chief 


6556 


Annette Spreer 




Advertising manager 


6560 


Ron Johnson 




Director/news adviser 


6555 


Gloria Freeland 




Associate director/advertising adviser 6555 


Linda Puntney 




Assistant director/yearbook adviser 


6555 


Jackie Harmon 




Ad billing/special events 


6555 


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KANSAS SI Al 1 



Kedzie 103 tjusi c.ki ot tho K-surv L nion) 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 
HURRICANE ANDREW 



August 26, 1992 -T A 






Florida left with a mess 



ASSOCIATED PRESS 



MIAMI — South Florida fought 
off looting, disease and desperation 
Tuesday in the wake of Hurricane 
Andrew, and the storm's dazed 
survivors jammed roads and formed 
lines in a scramble for necessities. 

Labradors trained to sniff out 
bodies joined the effort to measure 
the full devastation left by the 
hurricane, which may be the 
nation's costliest natural disaster. 
One preliminary estimate put the 
toll at up to $20 billion, 

"It's pandemonium," said 
Thomas Moore, an official at a 
shelter filled with 70 ill, elderly 
nursing-home evacuees in the hard- 
hit Richmond Heights area, about 
10 miles south of central Miami. 
One evacuee died earlier, and 
Moore said everything from 
medicine to adult diapers was 
needed. 

Federal and state government 
relief efforts were joined by 
donations from supermarkets and 
bottlcd-water companies, kitchens 
set up by the Salvation Army and 
Southern Baptists, and U.S. military 
field rations. 

Andrew whirled across the Gulf 
of Mexico toward coastal areas in 
Louisiana, where residents were 



forewarned by scenes in southern 
Florida. 

The storm badly damaged an 
uncounted number of homes 
Monday, as well as an Air Force 
base, Miami's popular zoo. mobile 
home parks and department stores. 

At least 14 people died when 
Andrew pounded Miami's southern 
suburbs and nearby farm 
communities with winds that 
lopped 1 60 mph. The storm had left 
three confirmed deaths in the 
Bahamas on Sunday. 

Florida's death toll seemed 
certain to rise. 

"Some bodies are caught in the 
wreckage, and they have had to be 
left for the time being," said Jay 
Eaker, a Federal Emergency 
Management Agency spokesman in 
Tallahassee. 

The Coast Guard reported 
finding a man Monday evening 
aboard a 48-foot pleasure boat. He 
told his rescuers that two 
companions were washed 
overboard in Biscayne Bay, and a 
helicopter and vessel searched there 
Tuesday. 

Three Labrador retrievers trained 
in body recovery were sent to the 
wreckage of shopping centers in 
Cutler Ridge, a town on the 
southern fringes of metropolitan 



Miami where authorities suspected 
some people were buried under 
debris. 

Police, bolstered by 2,(100 
National Guardsmen, promised a 
hard line against looting as a 7 p.m. 
to 7 a.m. countywide curfew was 
extended Tuesday night. Police 
made at leasl 200 arrests for looting 
and curfew violations, 

"We will ftll the jails up until 
they're running over," said 
Detective Donald Blocker of the 
Metro- Dade police. 

Gov. Lawton Chiles set up a 
command posi in a Miami Lakei 
hotel running on its own generator 
and said lie would direct the 
government front South Florida 
until the crisis is eased. He visited 
more ravaged neighborhoods 
Tuesday after touring Monday with 
President Bu*h 

"These folks need to know we're 
going to try to help them," Chiles 
said. "There's some things I think 
we can do to cut red tape." 

Disaster officials said 50,000 
people were homeless, with nearly 
.15,000 still in shelters. 

The Federal Emergency 
Management Agency set up a 
Miami office to direct relief efforts 
and take applications for assistance. 
Some 1.800 mobile homes were 



being shipped for temporary 
housing. 

The hurricane stranded some 
2.000 travelers when Miami 
International Airport was closed at 
1 1 p.m. Monday. The airport 
reopened Tuesday evening, and 
Federal Aviation Administration 
supervisor Richard Schultz said 
airline flight schedules should be 
back to normal by today. 

Officials said the airport suffered 
only minor damage. 



Expansion on its way 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5A 

like with (he expansion, but has 
plenty of other design options 
available. 

"We want this facility to be as 
flexible of a building as possible," 
Westberg said. "We are trying to 
develop the most functional, yet 
exciting, project that we can." 

After the designs are complete 
with specifications, the state will 
open bids to construction 
companies for the contract. Robe I 
said. He expects completion of the 



expansion to be mid-ye.ii IW4. 

Expansion of the H<.\ ' omplex 
is much needed. Robe! uud. \txjut 
2,000 students used the Ret 
Complex daily last yeai «*»> 

for the year. The current budding 
has 93.000 square feet. The 
expansion will add another $8,000 
square feet and will io>t S7.M2 
million. 

"With the expanded facilities, 

we expect :• big impact io the 
number of people using the 
complex." Kobel said 



ACCEPT 

MEDICARE 
ASSIGNMENT 




DERMATOLOGY 

Robert H. Cathey, M.D.P.A. 
Diplomate Am Board Dermatology 

DISEASES OF SKIN • HAIR • NAILS 
•SKIN CANCER • COLLAGEN INJECTIONS 
•SPIDER VEIN TREATMENT 

(Mamaian i Except On Days Below) 
Junction Ciy ..i st 4 3ra wed. erf each mc 
AI3*ene.-2na Wea of eacn inonti 
For any appointment call 



537-4990 

1133 College Av 



UPPER LEVEL 
8LDG B 



Accreditation review shining 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A 

community, and you don't find that 
on many college campuses." 

The 10-year renewal is the 
maximum accreditation period 
granted by the commission. 

After the evaluation was 
completed, concerns and strengths 
were listed. Among the strengths 
were a positive attitude toward the 
University among faculty, staff and 
students: effectively including 
students and faculty in government; 
admired administration: dedicated 
faculty; strategically planning fund 
allocation; and an effective student- 
recruitment program. 



Most of the concerns addressed 
the lack of funds allocated to the 
University. The report called for 
improvements in non-competitive 
faculty salaries, library space and 
the shortage of state-of-the-art 
equipment and computing resources 
for academic and administrative 
purposes. 

Wefald said most of those 
concerns were out of the 
administration's control because 
they depended on state funds. But 
he said the No. I priority is faculty 
salaries. 

The third section of the 
evaluation offers advice and 



suggestions for all departments. It 
also gives an outline for strategic 
planning for several of K Stale's 
colleges 

Wefald said the administration 
will do its best to implement any 
changes needed to meet the 
criterion. To keep the Universit) ;tt 
the high student- and faculty - 
satisfaction level reported in the 
analysis. Wefald said he would 
L-onsiantl) try to improve, 

"We're not taking anything for 
granted. We know we have to do 
better," he said "We want to take it 
up another notch by working with 
the students and the faculty." 




FALL 1992 CLOSED CLASS LIST 



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SHUTTLE HOURS 

August 19 1 :00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. 

August 20 & 21 ..8:30 a.m> 4:00 p.m. 

August 24 - 28 ..............8:30 a.m.- 4^X) p.m. 

EXIT AT THE K-STATE UNION BOOKSTORE 



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DO 
NOT 
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Look for the 
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ft* K-Sttt« Union Snuttli to Wt Boomton it *• Hop n«*f t»t you. 

1. Derby Food Center 

2. Smurthwaite Scholarship House 

3. Beta Sigma Psl Fraternity 

4. Southwest Corner of Weber Parking Lot 

5. Jardine Community Building (East Side) 

6. Kramer Food Center 

7. West Stadium Parking Lot 

8. South side of Union (by the parking lot) 

Signs posted at eacfi stop give approximate 

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Trie stiuttit departs from Union 

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8A 



August 26, 1902 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Classes restored, thanks to partial enrollment adjustment 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A 

philosophy and English 
departments. 

According to both Feyerharm 
and Bosco. the situation could have 
been worse had K-State not 
received the partial enrollment 
adjustment. 

Opening more class sections. 



purchasing instructional equipment, 
and other operating expenses were 
covered by $925,000 out of the total 
adjustment. 

"Frankly, 1 don't know how we 
would have managed without it," 
Bosco said. "Thank God, we got it." 

The largest share of money 
went to the College of Arts and 



Sciences, and Feyerharm said the 
money was used to restore class 
sections that had been cut in 
February. 

"The funds that came in were 
used primarily to give students what 
they had last year," he said. "And 
we're pretty close to where we were 
last year." 



But Feyerharm and Bosco 
agreed that, unless something is 
done soon, the situation is going to 
become desperate. 

"It's getting tougher and 
tougher," Feyerharm said. "And 
we're having more and more 
difficulty." 

Bosco said he lays that blame 



squarely on the shoulders of the 
Legislature and that he's not 
hopeful for a solution soon. 

"There is no longer any central 
focus in our state that is planning 
for the needs of higher education 
for the year 2000," Bosco said. "1 
wonder aloud who is looking at the 
demographics at our state high 



schools where enrollments are 
increasing by 20 percent throughout 
the state." 

Still. Bosco promises that 
enrollment stabilization will not 
keep out any future students. 



Schools' numbers vary 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A 

row that enrollment at Wichita 
State has declined. Enrollment 
peaked there in 1988-89 when 
1 7,419 were registered. 

Pittsburg State University 
officials reported an enrollment 



jump of 9 percent, as 5,783 students 
enrolled for the fall semester. 

Enrollment numbers for other 
regents schools were not yet 
available. All figures wilt not be 
official until the 20th day of 
classes. 



Andrew attacks again 



PAT M. DREILING D.D.S. M.S., P. A. 

Practice limited to Orthodontics 
TRANSFERS WELCOME 

537-0136 



Manhattan Med. Center 

1 1 33 College Ave. Building D 



members American 
Association of Orthodontics 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A 

to be somewhere around 40 to 50 
miles wide," Sheets said. 

Hooding was feared as the storm 
began moving parallel to the coast, 
pummeling a wide swath with 
heavy rain. The storm's forward 
motion also slowed to 1 3 mph from 
16 mph earlier in the day. 

Gov. Edwin Edwards declared a 
state of emergency for all of 
Louisiana and wrote to the While 
House requesting a disaster 
declaration before the hurricane hit. 
More than 2 million people in 
Mississippi. Louisiana and Texas 



were asked or told to leave their 
coastal homes. 

Earlier, traffic heading north 
from the Cajun coastland was 
bumper to bumper for as far as the 
eye could see on U.S. 90 — more 
than 3 1/2 miles at one bend. 
Traffic was also tied up on 
Interstate 49. 

The evacuation orders carried 
added weight because most people 
had seen pictures of the destruction 
in Florida, where parts of southern 
Dade County, below Miami, were 
left in ruins. 



Hansen Nutrition Center 

Diet cures what diet causes 
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PORTS 



K-STATE BASEBALL 

K State Baseball coach Mike Clark will have a 
preseason meeting Thursday for all returning 
players and anyone else interested in trying out for 
the team. The meeting is scheduled for 5 p.m. 
Thursday in the Brandeberry Complex, next to Prank 
Myers Baseball Field. 



AUGUST 26, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




Aquajocks 



J. KUTTWW RNU/Coliagan 



Top to bottom: Eric Finger, MHS student, Andy Artnbrust, senior in secondary education, Andrea Bio, senior 
in accounting, and Steve Sedam, MHS student, play two-on-two water basketball in the Natatorlum Tuesday. 



ATHLETIC DEBT 



Athletics fixing debt 



Cottefim 

The athletic department managed 
to operate in the black in the 1992 
fiscal year for ihe first time since 
1985. 

The Department of 

Intercollegiate Athletics ended the 
year with a surplus of $265,020 
under the guidance of first-year 
Athletic Director Milt Richards. 

In addition to the surplus, the 
department paid off $330,000 of the 
capital -improvement debt. 

The department has changed its 
procedure in figuring its maximum 
credit. Jack Key, assistant athletic 
director and chief financial officer, 
said the department could shrink the 
debt from $5.4 million to $4,4 
million through restructuring the 
cash- flow debt. 

"We didn't borrow as much 
money as we could." he said. "We 
had enough cash on hand." 

The end-of-fhe-year surplus is a 
step in the right direction, Richards 
said. 

"Only 20 percent of all Division 
I athletic departments operate in the 
black. So. we're obviously pleased 
with that announcement." he said. 

Richards credited a successful 
football program and fund-raising 
efforts. 

"The football season made about 
$400,000 more lhan we planned." 
Key said. "In fund raising, it's the 
best we've ever done." 

Ernie Barrett, assistant athletic 
director, and his team raised a 
record high of $1.2 million. Key 
said the department realized most 
donations would come in small 
amounts. 
"I think there are a lot of people out 



there who have never been asked 
who would be willing to give K 
State athletics money." he said. "It's 
a whole lot easier to get 10 $40 
donors than one $5,000 donor." 

On the down side, the men's 
basketball team fell behind the 
projected revenue. Key said this 
was due to low attendance. 

And the future possibility of 
sliding into a deficit has called for 
reshaping the budget. 

"We have a very, very 
conservative budget," Richards 
said. "Starting with this month, 
we're operating with a five year 
financial plan. It's based on our best 
estimate of the picture of the 
athletic department and will be 
updated every year." 

Key said next year's budget is 
$8.5 million. 

"We're lowering the total budget 
by $300,000. which was 
accomplished by an 8 -percent cut," 
he said. 

The cut's purpose is to save 
money for the facility projects for 
the upcoming year, planned and 
unplanned. 

The cut of about $700,000 
provided money to repair the R.V. 
Christian Track for an estimated 
cost of $250,000, which was 
scheduled for 1996. The 1998- 
planned infield turf renewing of 
Frank Myers Field was rescheduled 
for this year, at a cost of $275,000. 

Total project costs for 1992 add 
up to $865,000 for repairs and 
installing additional facilities. 

The new football press box and 
football indoor complex cost more 
than $3 million but will be financed 
by private donors. Key said. 



"The football 
season made 
about 
$400,000 
more than we 
planned. In 
fund raising, 
it's the best 
we've ever 
done." 

JACKKf.Y 



SPORTS DIGEST 



l 

L 






t c 



► RANGERS OUTGUN 
KANSAS CITY, 6-2 

ARLINGTON, Texas — Kevin Reimer 
hit a long two- fun homer and Ruben Sierra 
added a solo shot as the Texas Rangers 
beat the Kansas City Royals 6-2 Tuesday 
night and stopped a 
seven-game home 
losing streak. 

George Brett went 2 
for 4, including a solo 
homer in the sixth, and 
tied Willie Keeler for 
20th place on the career 
hit list at 2.962. Brett, 
who has six homers this 
season, homered in 

consecutive games for the first time since 
Jury 24-25, 1990. 

Jose Guzman (11-10) allowed seven 
hits in seven innings, struck out five and 
walked two. He gave up solo homers to 
Brett and Keith Miller, who hit his fourth of 
the season in the first. 

Kevin Appier (14-6) gave up five runs 
and nine hits in five innings. 




► COLLEGE FOOTBALL 
BEGINS TONIGHT 

ANAHEIM, Calif — Even without its 
best pass rusher. Texas A&M s defense 
gives Stanford coach Bill Walsh plenty to 
worry about when the Aggies and 
Cardinals get an early start on the season 
tonight in the Pigskin Classic. 

Last year. A&M had the nation's top 
defense, allowing just 222.4 yards per 
game. 

►CHIEFS SEND 14 
PLAYERS PACKING 

KANSAS CITY — The Kansas City 
Chiefs made no surprise announcements 
Tuesday when they released 1 4 players 
and made other roster moves to reduce 
their squad to 60 

Among those released cornerbacks 
Herbie Anderson. Eric Everett and 
Raymond Irvin; defensive tackle Darryl 
Grant; offensive tackle Pete Shorts; wide 
receivers Marcus Grant and Byron 
Jackson and guard Dean Brown 



Giving the tri a try 



To register 
call Jason 
Bradley at 
776-8082, 
or Matt 
Hayman at 
532-6765. 



Wildcat Sprint Triathlon 
begins two weeks from 
Saturday; registration still open 



I 



Collefiu 

Area athletes will compete once again in the 
KSU Wildcat Sprint Triathlon two weeks from 
Saturday. 

The course will be in and around the River Pond 
areas of Tuttle Creek State Park. 

This year's triathlon is dedicated to Spencer 
Willey Gillun, who recently died of sudden illness 
at the age of 16 months. Gillun was the son of 
Wildcat triathlon club member Charlie Gillun and 
his wife, Anne. 

The 13.3-mile event, organized by the Wildcat 
Triathlon Club and the Center for Exercise 
Research at K-State, starts off with a 0.3-mile 
swim, continues on a 9.9-mile bike tour and 
concludes with a 3. 1 -mile run. 

Mate and female athletes, who must be at least 
15 years old, compete in eight age groups. The 
five-year age groups start with the 15- 19 group and 
conclude with the 50 and over group. 

Race director Jason Bradley, senior in veterinary 
medicine, said he expects about 120-150 entries 
from Manhattan, Kansas City, Lawrence and 
southeastern Nebraska. 

The course, changed slightly from last year, is 
considered moderate and does not give an expert in 



one event a decisive advantage, Bradley said. 

"The swim is very deal able for most people, but 
the athletes have to realize it's an open-water 
swim," he said, "The bike tour is moderately hilly, 
with one 'dead dog hill* from the transition area up 
to the dam. And the run is fiat and fast." 

The sprint triathlon offers newcomers an 
opportunity to get (heir feet wet for future 
competitions. 

"It's a very good race to start with," Bradley 
said. "It gives a base on what the triathlete has to 
work for the next lime." 

Besides individual competition, teams of three 
athletes, one for each leg, can enter the event. All 
teams — whether male, female or mixed — also 
compete within separate age groups. 

"(The reason) to have team competitions is 
because a lot of people don't have the lime to 
practice for all three events," Bradley said. "A lot 
of the athletes do a team triathlon first and then 
switch to individual competitions." 

The team competition will begin after all 
individual heats have started, with one heat every 
five minutes. The men's heat will be first, with all 
female athletes in the second heat, followed by the 
remaining men's individual heats. 

Race registrations are $25 per individual and 
$60 per team and will be accepted until Sept. 3. 

Late entries are welcomed however, from Sept. 
6 until race day, at a cost of $35 per individual and 
$75 per team. 



TRIATHLON COURSE 



Hare is the course lor KSU 
Wildcat Spnm Triathlon 
which a at 10 am. Sept 12 
near Tuttle Creek 
Reservoir 

SWIM .3 miles 



9.9 miles 
3,1 mites 



RUN 



Tuttle Creek 
Reservoir 




1 COTTONWOOD SHELTER 
HOUSE — Ptck up race packets 

a STATE PARK Of FICE — Pari* 
permits sokJ here 

3 START/FINISH of swim 

* HOLDING AREA tor txcydes 

m DEAD DOG HILL 

a Bicyclists lake right at top ol 
dam 

T Bicydisls turn right towards 
Rocky Ford 

A Bicyclists turn right and go 
north. 

9 Bicydisls across dam and down 

lo ftmah line 

S O Finish ime 



August 26, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



CAMPAIGN '92 



Candidates seek 
votes by speaking 
to Legionnaires 



Republican accusation of Clinton tax increases 
labeled as misleading by top campaign official 



Bush, Clinton 
offer different 
ideas on service 



ASSOCIATED I 



CHICAGO — Bill Clinton 
appealed to veterans Tuesday not to 
oppose his presidential candidacy 
just because he avoided serving in 
Vietnam, President Bush pointedly 
reminded them that when his time 
came to serve in World War II. "I 
was scared but 1 was willing." 

The presidential rivals appeared 
two hours apart before an American 
Legion convention. First, Bush 
extolled his experience as a 
wartime fighter pilot and 
commander-in-chief. Then, Clinton 
tried to bury the controversy about 
his Vietnam-era draft status. 

"You know I never served in the 
military. You know I opposed the 
war in Vietnam," the Arkansas 
governor said. "But I want you to 
know this. I was never against the 
heroic men who served in the war. 

"If you choose to vote against 
me because of what happened 23 
years ago, that's your right and I 
respect that," Clinton said. "But it is 
my hope you will cast your vote 
while looking toward the future 
with hope rather than remaining 
fixed to the problems of the past." 
The veterans applauded. 
In raising the matter before a 
group of veterans Clinton hoped to 
blunt it as a campaign issue. He 
compared his action to John 
Kennedy going before the Greater 
Houston Ministerial Association in 
1960 to face head-on the issue of 
people voting against a candidate 
because of his Catholic religion. 

"If I should lose this election on 
the real issues, I shall be satisfied 
that 1 tried my best and was fairly- 
judged," Clinton said. 

Bush, too. used his appearance 
to defend himself — in the 
president's case against accusations 
that he stopped the gulf war too 
soon rather than sending troops into 
Baghdad to crush Saddam 
Hussein's government. 

"We are not in the slaughter 
business," Bush said, raising his 
voice. "We were in the business of 



f Music reviews j 

and more. flft 

IgOLLEGIA^J 



TO THE EDITOR 



Your views are important. 
The COLLEGIAN editorial 
page is an open forum for 
our readers' ideas. Please 
bring your letters to the edi- 
tor to Kedzic Hall 116. Let- 
ters must be signed, and the 
author must show an ID. 



stopping aggression, and I don't 
like these historical revisions. We 
did the right thing." 

Bush, who also was applauded 
by the Legionnaires, said his top 
military advisers as well as Gen. 
Norman Schwarzkopf, had told htm 
the battle had been won and it was 
time to stop. 

In other campaign developments 
Tuesday: 

— Bush flew to Detroit where 
he told a rally in suburban Canton 
that a Clinton proposal to increase 
car mileage standards would throw 
American auto workers out of their 
jobs. Dozens of auto workers 
protested Bush's visit, waving pink 
slips to suggest his policies were 
responsible for layoffs in the 
industry. 

— Vice President Dan Quayle 
whistlestopped across North 
Carolina by train, deriding Clinton 
as "Tax Hike Bill" and contending 
he had raised taxes repeatedly in 
Arkansas and would do the same in 
Washington. 

— Al Gore, the Democratic vice 
presidential candidate, toured a 
supercomputer center in Columbus, 
Ohio. He ridiculed Bush's new job- 
training proposal, saying it was 
designed to save only two jobs — 
those of Bush and Quayle. 

In Chicago, both Bush and 
Clinton lavished praise on the 
veterans and were well-received in 
return. Clinton was far more 
detailed in his promises to support 
veterans* programs and causes. 

Among the Legionnaires, 
opinion was mixed on whether 
Clinton's lack of military service 
and the steps he took to' avoid being 
drafted should be a campaign issue. 
But there was no mistaking the 
dissatisfaction with Bush over the 
administration's handling of 
veterans' affairs and the economy. 

Clinton, saying he owed 
veterans one final statement on the 
issue, told the group he got a draft 
notice in 1969 and was told by his 
draft board he could finish his 
school year. He said he then joined 
an ROTC program to avoid the 
draft but soon reversed that 
decision and submitted to the then- 
new draft lottery, only to draw a 
high number and never be called. 



WOCUTTOWItl 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — The 
latest Republican tines of attack on 
Democrat Bill Clinton fault the 
Arkansas governor for raising taxes 
128 times — and enjoying it. In 
fact, the real figure is much smaller. 

The Clinton campaign admits to 
49 tax increases, including more 
than $260 million in tax increases 
for a $2-billion state budget in 
1991. 

The Bush-Quayle campaign's 
list of alleged Clinton tax increases 
counts four tax boosts twice. And 
Clinton supporters say it also 
includes items the average voter 
would not consider a tax or an 
unreasonable fee. 

Two of the 128 entries on the 
Bush-Quayle list are increases in 
the percentage of bets the state gets 



from dog- and horse-racing tracks. 
Another lengthened the dog-racing 
season, which is a tax hike only in 
the sense that a longer season 
increases the state's take from 
wagers. 

Most of the fees on the list raise 
little money or target a specific 
audience. For example, one fee is 
assessed on people convicted in 
Arkansas courts. 

President Bush, in his speech last 
week at the Republican National 
Convention, said Clinton had 
boosted taxes 128 times and 
"enjoyed it every time." Vice 
President Dan Quayle tossed out the 
same figure on Tuesday as he 
campaigned in North Carolina, 
depicting Arkansas as a state ol 
high taxes and low incomes. 

Overall, Arkansas ranked 13th 
among the states in a study of state 



tax bills, and it ranked -tfith in local 
tax burden, according to the 1990 
report of the Advisory Commission 
on Intergovernmental Relations. 

"The list is totally misleading," 
Betsey Wright, a top aide in 
Clinton's campaign, said of the 
Bush-Quayle list. The campaign 
acknowledges 49 "actual taxes" 
increased under Clinton, [he biggest 
earmarked for education, health 
care and roads. 

Wright, Clinton's former chief 
of staff, said Republicans also fail 
to mention Clinton supported 4S 
tax - red uc I ion measures. 

Records kept by the 
Legislatures staff show that fewer 
than 30 tax increases supponcd by 
Clinton generated about $100,000 a 
year. 

Clinton did support more than 
$260 million in tax increases in 



1991, the year of his most recent 
legislative session. 

A $150-million sales tax 
increase is paying for a host of 
education programs. About $80 
million in new gasoline taxes are 
being levied to improve roads. 
Health-care professionals agreed to 
pay $30 million in taxes to keep the 
Medicaid program afloat and get 
higher reimbursement rates. 

A 1 99 1 increase in the corporate 
tax rate went to vocational 
education schools. 

Personal income taxes averaged 
$314 per person in Arkansas in 
1990; the national average was 
$425. General sales taxes in the 
state averaged $4 1 3. compared with 
a national average of $488. Because 
of Arkansas' low income, sales 
taxes claimed a relatively high 3. 1 
percent of personal income. 



KSU WILDCAT 




SOCCER 

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Room 206 in the Union 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 26, 1992 




J. MAmmr RMAColleQan 



Bart through art 

Bart Fromme, sophomore in art education, takes time to look at a display in the Union Art Gallery. 



MCCAIN 



3B 



Laser Zeppelin blends sight, 
sound into high-tech concert 



Collejiin 

You could travel to see Disney 
World or the Academy Awards, but 
they're coming to McCain 
Auditorium Thursday night. 

Laser Zeppelin is a rock concert 
without the band. 

It entails thousands of laser 
beams shooting out over the 
audience as a 10.000-watt Dolby 
concert system, featuring the 
famous .W-speaker cabinet wall of 
bass, bellows out Led Zeppelin 

This is a different show, going 
after classic rock and full 
technology to create 
entertainment effect,' 
Winthrop of Brian 
International Ltd. 

The BWI production has been 
touring laser concerts for eight 
years and has appeared at more than 
500 venues nationwide. The 
company also specializes in other 
types of laser shows. 

Led Zeppelin was chosen 



a different 
said Matt 
Winthrop 



because the music is harder and 
better suited for the laser show. 
Since we're working with K-Rock 
(KMKF-FM 101.5) to produce ihe 
show, it's more exciting for the 
students," Winthrop said. 

The McCain show features two 
high-power laser systems with an 
entire bank of computers and laser 
projector. 

While one laser projects full- 
color laser images on a 500-squarc- 
foot screen, the other lasers shoot 
beams out over the audience. The 
beams then hit crystal mirrors 
throughout the room to form a 
three-dimensional spider weh of 
lasers, also known as the Star Wars 
effect, 

"The two laserists try to create 
an exciting new show every time. 
Some graphics are already 
programmed into the computer. 
And other effects — like fog jets 
and mirror balls — help produce a 
strong audience response," 
Winthrop said. 



Lasers have become high-tech 
and more prevalent in the enter- 
tainment industry. This will be the 
first time a touring laser concert 
will feature an electric screen. 
During the show, it can be raised 
up. and the system can shoot full- 
color beams and tunnels out over 
the audience. 

Audience members wary of 
lasers being projected above them 
need not worry. BWI is overseen by 
the Center for Devices and Radio- 
logical Health, a branch of the Food 
and Drug Administration. 

"They have very strict guidelines 
by which we have to fotlow. so it is 
a safe industry. Also, there is very 
little documentation if it is 
potentially dangerous since there is 
a difference between the lasers used 
for entertainment and those used for 
clinical purposes." Winthrop said. 

The Laser Zeppelin rock concert 
is at 8 p.m. Thursday in McCain. 
Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 
Thursday. 



) Film good despite low budget and repeat storyline 



mchawd umtuam 

Cotfe|ian 

"Straight Out Of Brooklyn" 
looks as if it was shot on a flimsy 
$500 budget and with a cast who 
probably never will see the big- 
time. And it follows a storyline that 
has been done millions of times 
before. 

It is also one of the best films 



I've seen in a long time. 

Winner of the Special Jury Prize 
at the prestigious 1991 Sundance 
Film Festival, this film is a 
beautiful example for the argument 
that good cinema doesn't require a 
swollen budget, snazzy special 
effects or a glamorous cast. 

"Straight Out Of Brooklyn" 
turns its negatives into positives. 



and in the process creates a stark, 
simple story that does something 
few films nowadays accomplish. It 
makes you think. 

REVIEW ■*■ it tin 

Filmed and set in Brooklyn's 
Red Hook housing projects. 
"Straight Out Of Brooklyn" is the 
story of the struggling. Mack- 



working-class Brown family caught 
in the vortex of trying to survive. 

Ray Brown, played extremely 
well by George T. Odom. is a father 
whose desire for a good life for his 
family throws him into a 
frightening paradox. 

At times, he is a sensitive and 
compassionate individual. At 
others, he is a violently abusive 



parent and spouse. Bitter at what he 
feels is a white society that has kept 
him down all his life. Ray is the 
hamster in the wheel — too worn 
out to try to get off. His drunken 
soliloquy midway through the film 
is almost as powerful as the film's 
ending. 

Dennis Brown (Lawrence 
Gillian! Jr. t is Ray's son. a teenager 



who has had his fill of a life with no 
foreseeable future. He wants out, 
and now. His desperate plan to 
escape is the crux of the film's plot. 
but it's not the most fascinating 
aspect of this work. The clincher is 
the consequences Dennis must face 
tor his actions. 

■ Sec Brooklyn page 5B 




KANSAS STATI 

COLLEGIAN 

532-6556 




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Thursday, August 27. 1992 
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4R August 26, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



■••mmpmmih 







INTERNATIONAL 



Neither rain, nor ... 



J. KYI* WTATT CoJIegan 



Slight showers Tuesday didn't hinder many students, as they put umbrellas to use on their way to 
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COLLEGIAN 1Q 



Government in Bosnia 
claims success, but 
fighting, shelling continue 



AtOCUTTO »«m 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia- 

Herzegovina — Outmanned and 
outgunned troops loyal to Bosnia's 
Muslim-led government claimed 
some successes Tuesday in their 
drive to break the Serb siege of 
Sarajevo, 

But a U.N. officer said it 
appeared the offensive was 
sputtering. 

Bosnia's Muslim, Serb and 
Croat factions have been trying to 
strengthen their positions before the 
Wednesday opening of a peace 
conference in London, sponsored 
by the European Community and 
the United Nations. 

Lord Carrington quit Tuesday as 
the EC's chief negotiator in the 
crisis, saying he did not have the 
time needed to mediate a settlement 
in the former Yugoslav federation. 

All truces reached during 
Carrington's peace efforts 
collapsed. 

NATO leaders, meanwhile, 
delayed a decision on sending 6,000 
soldiers to guard relief shipments to 
Bosnia- Herzegovina. 

The United States and its allies 
are wary about becoming embroiled 
in the conflict, and a NATO source 
said the alliance wanted to sec what 
happened at the peace talks. 



TRIAL 



I 



Psychologist 
testifies 
Dunn was 
'all but slave' 



TOPEKA — Lisa Dunn, 
standing trial a second time for 
kidnaping and murder, was unable 
to flee from her boyfriend who 
fancied himself as another Charles 
Manson. a psychologist testified 
Tuesday. 

Marilyn Hutchinson, a Kansas 
City, Mo., psychologist, said that 
during two February 1985 murders 
in Levant, Dunn was all but a slave 
to Daniel Remeta. 

She testified in Shawnee County 
District Court that Dunn suffered 
from the battered woman syndrome 
and post-traumatic stress disorder 
as Remeta systematically abused 
and terrorized her. Remeta is on 
death row in Florida. He also has 
been found guilty of one murder in 
Arkansas and three in Kansas. 

"He was actually fashioning 
himself after Charles Manson," 
Hutchinson said. 

Dunn, 26, faces two counts each 
of murder and kidnaping 



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The upsurge in fighting Tuesday 
reduced already -modest hopes for 
the peace conference. 

Similar efforts earlier failed to 
end the carnage, which began when 
Bosnia-Herzegovina's majority 
Muslims and Croats voted for 
independence Feb. 29. 

Ethnic Serb militias want to 
remain united with the smaller 
Yugoslavia, which is dominated by 
Serbia and seized control of much 
of Bosnia's territory. 

At least 8,000 people have died 
in the fighting — U.S. Senate 
investigators say up to 35.000 
civilians have been killed — and 
more than 1 million are homeless. 



Montene gro 

QMOOMY A. MUMtOttCo*0gun 

Fighting erupted with new 
intensity in the Bosnian capital after 
a relatively quiet night. Mortar 
rounds and rockets smashed into the 
presidential building and adjacent 
military headquarters. Several large 
buildings were ablaze by dusk. 

Warplanes flown by Serbs 
reportedly attacked the cities of 
Jajce, Tuzla and Hajici in Bosnia. 

The commander of Bosnian 
government forces. Sefer Haliovic, 
also accused Serbs of using "nerve 
gas" against his troops. 

These Bosnian claims could not 
be verified. 



KANSAS 



mmm 



Coffey County 
officials indicted 



7 charged 

with offenses; 
arraignment set 

ASSOCIATED PRESS 



BURLINGTON — Attorneys 
for six current and former 
Coffey County officials indicted 
by a county grand jury were 
given another week Tuesday to 
study the charges. 

The arraignments of the six in 
Coffey County District Court 
were continued to Sept. I, the 
same day on which a seventh 
official is to be arraigned. 

Indictments issued by a 
county grand jury Aug. 19 
charge the seven with offenses 
ranging from theft to violating 
the Kansas bid laws, according 
to Steve Doering, a special 
prosecutor from Garnet t. 

Named in the indictments are 
County Engineer Harry L. 
Hunsley of Burlington; present 
county commissioners Melvin 
Bunge of Wavcrly. Vernon 
Sergeant of Lebo, Johnnie 
Sleezer of Gridlcy and Melvin 
Cummings of Burlington; former 
county commissioner David 
Beard of Burlington; and County 
Road Superintendent George 
Finical of Burlington. 

Arraignments for all but 
Finical had originally been set 
for Tuesday. 

District Magistrate Judge 



Phillip Fromme called ihe grand 
jury in June after a group called 
the Coffey County Concerned 
Citizens presented petitions 
requesting the investigation. 

Doering Mas named special 
prosecutor for the hearings 
because of a conflict of interest 
involving Coffey County 
Attorney Brad Jones, who is the 
official representative of the 
County Commission. 

The indictments are contained 
in four criminal complaints. 

One complaint contains four 
separate counts alleging that the 
five past and current county 
commissioners and Hunsley, in 
various combinations, violated 
state laws requiring competitive 
bids on road and bridge projects 
costing more than $5,000. 

The complaint alleges that 
contracts for guardrail 
installation, general road 
improvements and painting 
stripes on roads were awarded 
even though bids weren't sought. 

Finical and Hunsley are each 
charged with one count unlawful 
deprivation of property for 
allegedly renting county 
equipment, in violation of state 
law. 

Hunsley and Finical are also 
charged with one count each of 
theft and permitting a false claim 
and official misconduct. 

Doering said the defendants, 
if convicted, face possible fines 
or sentences in the county jail. 



CALIFORNIA 



Firefighters tackle 
64,000-acre blaze 
in West for 6th day 



ROUND MOUNTAIN. Calif. — 
Exhausted firefighters spent a sixth 
day Tuesday tackling a 64.000-acre 
fire that already has ravaged an area 
twice the size of San Francisco and 
caused an estimated $5.5 million in 
damage. 

The ftre, which has destroyed 
307 homes in several hamlets along 
Highway 299, was kept in check 
overnight and was declared 60 
percent contained. But fire bosses 
warned that flames could overrun 
containment lines again if forecasts 
of milder winds proved false. 

"Cautiously optimistic is the 
term we are using." said U.S. Forest 
Service official Pam Bowman. 

In Idaho, a 257,000-acre fine — 
Ihe largest of several burning 
throughout the West — threatened 



a tree believed to be the state's 
oldest ponderosa pine. The 
branches of the 1 86- foot tree caught 
fire Monday evening but it wasn't 
clear whether the trunk was burned. 

That blaze was about 70 percent 
contained by early Tuesday, but 
authorities had 34 more miles of 
fire lines to cut. 

The so-called Fountain fire in 
Northern California was the worst 
of several fires in Ihe region. It has 
blackened enough commercial 
timber to build 50.000 houses so far 
has cost $5.5 million. 

At its peak last week, the fire 
forced the evacuation of 7,500 
people and drizzled ash as far away 
as San Francisco, about 200 miles 
to the south. 



h 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 26, 1992 



Citizens continue demand for ousting 



'Brooklyn' director is 
the true star of the film 



: i 



• 



ASSOCIATED P MM 

BRASILIA, Brazil — From city 
streets to the halls of Congress, 
pressure mounted Tuesday for the 
impeachment of President Fernando 
Collor de Mello. embroiled in a 
corruption scandal. 

Congress released a scathing 
report Monday that accused Collor 
of taking $6.5 million in undue 
benefits from his 1989 campaign 
[ re usurer Paulo Cesar Farias. 

Investigators said Collor knew 
Farias was running an extortion ring 
that took millions of dollars from 
businessmen in return for 
government contracts or favors. 

In Sao Paulo, more than 30,000 
elementary and high-school 



students chanting "Collor in Jail" 
and "Impeachment Now" marched 
through the banking district. Many 
wore striped prison-type shirts and 
waved Brazilian flags. 

Street vendor Carlos Ferrer sold 
T-shirts bearing the words: "I 
believe in the president, and in 
elves, Santa Claus and virginity." 
He said business was brisk. 

The report will be grounds for a 
petition to Congress by the 
Brazilian Bar Association for the 
impeachment of Collor, Brazil's 
first freely -elected president after 
21 years of military rule. 

"The president has lost the 
moral conditions to govern the 
country," said Gov. Luiz Antonio 
Fleury Filho of Sao Paulo, Brazil's 



richest and most populous slate. 

The 22-member panel of 
investigators is to vote Wednesday 
whether to approve the report. But 
the government already concedes it 
will lose. 

"Challenging the report would 
just radicalize the debate. It would 
be counter-productive," said Rep. 
Roberto Jefferson, one of Collor's 
most stalwart defenders on the 
panel. 

Instead, the government will try 
to block an impeachment request at 
Congress, where a two-thirds 
majority is needed to open 
proceedings. A vote is expected by 
Sept. 8. 

Collor has tried to shore up 
support by opening the public 



coffers to friendly legislators. He 
recently gave a pay raise to the 
military and released $400 million 
for low-cost housing and sanitation 
projects. 

But the government forces were 
seriously weakened when the 
leaders of two pro-government 
parties announced they would 
support impeachment. 

The center-left Democratic 
Labor Party broke with Collor ai an 
anti-corruption rally Monday night 
that drew more than 100,000 people 
in Rio de Janeiro. 

More damaging was the 
withdrawal of support by the 
conservative Social Democratic 
Party, one of Collor's earliest 
backers. 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3B 

The true star of this film, 
however, is its writer and director, 
Maity Rich. Only 19 years old 
when the movie was released in 
1991, Rich has the raw potential to 
show the film world that Spike Lee 
is not king of black cinema. 

Beyond his other duties. Rich 
also played the role of Dennis' 
friend Larry "Love" as well as 
penning a song for the film's 
soundtrack 

"Straight Out Of Brooklyn" docs 
not have the financial budget of a 
"Boyz 'N The Hood," and it is far 
from such a glossy production. Yet, 



by stripping away the glam, Matty 
Rich and his cast have made a film 
that seems much more real and 
tangible than "Boyz." 

I'd like to show this movie to all 
those wealthy GOP geezers oui 
there who insist that anyone can 
rise in this American society if they 
just pull themselves up by their 
bootstraps. This film shows it's 
easier said than done. 

The UPC Kaleidoscope film 
"Straight Out Of Brooklyn" will be 
showing tonight and Thursday at 7 
and 9:30 p.m. in K-State Union 
Forum Hall, and Friday at 7 p.m. in 
Liitle Theatre. Admission is $1.75, 






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29-38. Levi's denim shirt in teal, 

white, blue or red. S-XL. $30. 



Instant Old 560 Jean 

A loose interpretation of the 

classic Levi's jean with an easy 

fit through the seat and thigh. 

Sixes 29*38. Levi's denim shirt in 

white, teal, blue or red. S-XL. $30. 



Mega Bleach 560 Jean 

The zipper fly, five-pocket jean 
with the cool finish and loose fit 
that Levi's does best. Sizes 29-38. 
Levi's long sleeve, one pocket mock 

in red. black or teal. S-XL. $18. 



-o 



Instant Old 550 Jean 

Classic five-pocket jean cut with a relaxed scat, full thigh 
and tapered leg. Cotton denim with zipper fly, sizes 29-38. 
Levi's indigo stripe woven shirt with back yoke, S-XL, $28. 



Dillard's 




OAK PARK 



For Your Convenience We Accept Visa MasterCard American Express, Discover Carte Blanche Dinar's Club Or Your D<Hard s Charge 
BANNISTER • MISSION • WARD PARKWAY • INDEPENDENCE • METRO NORTH • INDIAN SPRINGS 
INTESRITY. . QUALITY VAIUE DISCOVER 1NE DIFFERENCE! Shop TttU» 1« A.M. • t P.M. • Plata II A.M. -I P.M. 



PLAZA 



TO PF K A 






August 26, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






E 



SSENTIALS 



DOUBLE BARRELED 



DARY1BLASI 



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ONE DAY TO LIVE 



ftORE PRIMITIVE (KEDICINE 



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Day 1 — the introduction. 

We have a couple who are madly in love 
with each other, but they aren't open with 
it because their fathers don't get along. 
The woman, Delilah, is from a wealthy 
family in Moscow. She has all the 
amenities in life with which most 
Muscovites are unfamiliar: eating at the 
Moscow McDonald's, owning a brand- 
new Yugo and never having her mail 
opened by the KGB. Meanwhile. Sputnik, 
her lover, grew up on a mayonnaise farm 
just outside of Kiev with his half-sister, 
Ogre Kornbutt, who knows only one 




BYSUEMRMUN 



language — Swahili — and her half-sister 
(Sputnik's quarter-sister), Susan, who 
works at the Moscow McDonald's as the 
Boris McLenin clown. The main reason 
their fathers don't get along is because the 
rivalry stems from a couple of centuries 
ago when Tybalt killed Mercutio. The 
hatred between the two families lingers on 
in this day and age. Anyway, Sputnik and 
Delilah mei when Sputnik loaded up his 
truck with his two pigs, Snow White and 
Napolean, and moved to Moscow. Movie 
stars ... a funky language ... BIG women ... 
a swimming pool. Sputnik is now a 
Moscow Hillbilly. 




CROSSWORD 



CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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a 1934 

song 
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1 2 Lenno n ' s 
lady 

13 Enameled 
met at ware 

14 Sticky stuff 

1 5 On pen- 
sion abOf 

18 Informal 
reception 

18 City on the 
Moselle 

20 Hebrew 
tatter 

21 Author 
Ludwng 

24 Type of 
bottle or 
hinge 

28 Spread out 

32 Mall 
feature 

33 Before 
carpet or 
cedar 

34 Marching 
coins? 

36 Narrow 
inlet 

37 Singer/ 
guitarist 
Clapton 

39 Watchful 
41 Lissome 



43 Johnny 
on the — 

44 TV alien 
46 Vacillate 
SO Like some 

sand- 
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55 Corrida 
cheer 

56 Word after 
tan or 
safety 

57 Crooner 
Perry 

58 New 
Guinea 
port 

59 Irritates 
WHS 

student 
61 Conclude 
DOWN 

1 Classify 

2 Unique 



person 

3 French 
novelist 

4 Raged 

5 School 
dance 

6 French 
island 

7 Confined 
6 Some pot 

bellies' 
9 Greek 
letter 

10 Harvest 
goddess 

1 1 Very small 
17 Ugly old 

crone 

19 Even, to 

a poet 

22 Blast or 
phone 
lead-in 

23 Sugar 





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Yesterday's answer 8-26 



EUGENE SHEFFER 

cubes 

25 Contrary 
gardener'' 

26 Nobelist 
Wiesel 

27 Metallic 
element 

28 Pitcher 
Hershiser 

29 Around: 
pre t u( 

30 Turn of 
the tide'' 

31 Look 
furtively 

35 Mountain 

in Wales 
38 Intones 
40 Airport 

schedule 

into 
42 Santa's 

helper 
45 Actuality 

47 Small 
rodent 

48 Ardor 

49 Actress 
Pamela 

50 Kimono 
sash 

51 Pay — 
view 

52 Lodge 
member 

53 Runner 
Sebastian 

54 Dutch WVOIME N J j IFBZW 
unde Yesterday's Cryptoqulp: THE GEOMETRY 

TEACHER IS SAYING, "I WANT TO WIDEN MY SO- 
CIAL CIRCLE." 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue: B equals G 




CTI HIDEO? an * w * f * to *****'* crossword, call 
W I VITirCVi 1 -900-4S4-6» 73 '99«pefmmuie touch 
lone / roiary phones (16+ only )AKir>g Feaiwei tervwe. NYC 



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LASSIFIEDS 



GET THE WORD OUT 

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN KEDZIE 103 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



1DAY 

2 DAYS 

3 DAYS 

4 DAYS 

5 DAYS 



20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

20 words or less — 

each word over 20 

(consecutive day 



$5 

— $.20 per word 

$6.25 

— $.25 per word 

$7.25 

— $.30 per word 

$8 

— $.35 per word 

$8.50 

— $.40 per word 
rate) 



HOW TO PAY 

M cteaetfleda mutt be ptM in advance 
unlaw you have en ettabttshed account 
with Student Pubffcatton*. 

Cash, ehaca, MasterCard or Was art 
accepted, Thart li 1 110 etrvie* charge 
on e9 returned checks. 

ws iMene the iksil to euH* laject or 
property dseiity any ad. 

HEADLINES 

For mi axtra charga, aptl put t 
i you as tt catch ma 



DEADLINES 



CANCELLATIONS 



Oaaeftjd ad* mat bt placed by It you m* your Ham twtora your «rf 

noon tta day Mtota tha data you aeot h*a«opHd,Mea rotund you lor ina 

your ad to run. Classnad «»p*aj ada r araaaH no day a. 
muattwplaosd by 4 pA.lw working ifou mu«i cot u* Mot* noon tha day 

dayt prior to rna daH you want your ad ma ad la to taa pubaanad 

FanFOUNOAD* "WB55S5-.*- 

A2i«*rrN»toyo*i,wi^totj)M4»dt ctJiJ*.W»KO^r**pcpT^hmfyorty 

JQ? HVatt Qiyi nV*t Of ClaaVOaV *W W% fin WQ I 



Call 532-6555 to p lace your classified] 




PARKING 

OP THE 



OR WRITE 
532-6555 coumian 

*** _ KeeWe IM IM 

532-7309 



OFFICE HOURS 

MONDAY-FW0AY 

8 i.m.-5 p.m. 

(Iicept hoMd e yej 




BULLETIN 
BOARD 




ADVANCED FLIGHT 

Training. MultHongino. 
inatrumont. commercial, 
ATP. CFI ratings. 
Private and instrument 
ground school 

Hugh Irvin at 539-3128 
evening*. 

ATTENTION LACHES) Take 
time to schedule a 
tree Mary Kay facial I 
Mary Kay ia a top- 
line skin core program. 
Invita tome friends. 
r» doubto tha tun 1 1 Call 
Karla Mation at 
5394342 

COME FLYwithua,K State 
Flying Club has 

five airplane*. For best 
price* call Sam 
Knipp, 539 6193 attar 
5:30p.m. 



NEED MORE student in Ling 
594 Comanche 

texts, (p. 65. class 
directory). For infor- 
mation: Jim Arm ego St, 
532-6873. Lea* 

ura 110S 

SHYNESS WORKSHOP. I* 
thyness inhibiting 
you? Five- session 
workshop will teach 
■kill* of overcoming 
shyness. Monday* 
3:30 5p.m beginning 
September 14, fee: 
S10. Call University 
Counseling Service* at 
532-692? to reserve a 
place. 

SMART ONE day diet! Rid 
15 to 20 pound* 
in 30 quick day*. Enjoy 
•ummerl 'Free 

Sample*' (BOO) 395 3979 




Only found edi can be 

placed tree of 
charge. 

LOST FEMALE ferret around 
the vicinity of 
Sixth and Fremont. She 
need* special 

caie. Please call 776- 
9328. 



driver* licorta* or other) 
when piecing a 




We require • form of 
picture ID IKSU or 



ELIZABETH H. I lova you 
and I'll be her* 
waiting I Happy 
Birthday, Jot. 

SBM 26. 6' 178 pounds. 
would like to meet a 
nice lady. 23 to 37 for 
romance and to- 
getherness Reply 
Collegian Box 1. 



040 s 



AMATEUR RADIO 'No- 
Code* license claas 
(DEN 201 ref#34460l 



Wed. 



Aug. 



26. 



7p.m. Dur lend 274. For 

tnformetion 

537-1591. 




05(F 



KAT -gZALUMS- Cartoa here 
wa come be- 
cause we're new alum*. 
Bring cash and 
card*, at 6:30 we're 
hitting the margs- 
JK. 



GET 

THE 

WORD 

OUT 



1 Classified Directory 


000 


400 


MlfN 


OPfJI 


MM*** 


NMKIT 


100 


500 


inuMv 


TRNN- 


MUBmn 


NMRMH 




600 


wmci 


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■ 





KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



'. l 






Collegian Classifieds 



August 26, 1092 7D 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



105* 



A HOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 
campus. Central air and 

-~ I. 537-0*78 



AIR CONDITIONED, very 
clean one, two, 
three-bedroom units. 
Furnished or unfur 
mshed. Quiet 

Surroundings for 
serious 

student*- Nine month 
lease available. No 
pet*. 537 8389 

CLOSE TO campus very 
nice, one, two. 
three and four- 
bedrooms. Apartment 



plexes and houses with 
great prices. 

637-2919,537-1666. 

NEWLYRE MODELED three- 
bedroom, two 
bath, one- half block 
from campus. No 
pett. 776-1340. 




CLOSE TO campus very 
nice. one, two, 
three and four 
bedrooms Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great price*. 

537-2919 537-1666. 

FOUR BEDROOM, TWO 
bath, central air. 
laundry, near campus. 
537-4800 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM, 
west side location 
Pool, central air, 
dishwasher, activities 
Available now, $449. 
53*7*89. 

SPACIOUS, VERY clean two- 
three bedroom. 
two bath, air 

conditioned, laundry 
hook- 
ups Weterbeds 
accepted. Quiet 
surround 

Ings for serious 
students. No pets. Also 
one 

and two bedroom units 
537 8389. 

THE PERFECT roommate 
apartment. Nine 
month leases. Extra 
large two-bedroom. 
Two private baths. 
Washer and dryer in- 
cluded. Dishwasher 
Swimming pool. Pri- 
vate balcony. 
Immediate availability. 
Up. 
perclastmen and 

Jjraduate students pre 
erred. Call 776-8641. 



WANTED 

Students looking lor 

living accommodations 

with their own 

bedroom within a 

4-bedroom townhome. 

In unit amenities include: 

• Drsmtasner 

• MkroHim 

• Wmhm&Drym 
Complex also includes: 
•HWfote 
•SiflrfVoiffririCowft 

As low as: 
JI95'month per person 
Will match roommates 

if necessary 
Call lor an appointment 



776-3804 




^ jgtafeW. 



OWN ROOM in a new 
house. $200 a month 
plus one- fourth utilities. 
Call Craig at 776 
6573 

SHARE FEMALE non- 
smoking, two-bed- 
room apartment, own 
room, less than 
one block from campus, 
utilities paid, 

negotiable. Call 
776-6683. 



120^ 



HOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 

bathroom* nsar 

campus. Central air and 
hasting. $600 537-0428. 



AVAILABLE SEPT 1 four 
bedroom. Located 
1715 Poynti. Two bath, 
fireplace. wash 
er/ dryer, yard. $620 
plus utilities, lease 
plu* deposit 539-3672 

TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE, 
two and one -ha If 
milts from Town Center 
on Highway 24. 
776-1340 



135- 



FREE ADVICE Purchase a 
mobile horn*. 

We finance low 
payments; two- 
bedroom, 

$149.75 monthly. 
Countryside 539-2325 




FEMALE- NON-SMOKING 
roommate wanted 
immediately. Share 
attractive four bed 
room with friendly/ 
trustworthy room- 
metes. $182/ month 
one-fourth reason- 
able utilities. Call 
539-4158, leave mes- 
sage 

MALE NEXT to campus/ 
Aggieville. $175, 
537-0289 

MALE ROOMMATE, 
graduate student, non- 
smoking to share two- 
bedroom apart- 
ments. One block to 
campus, share bath- 
room, furnished 
Washer, dryer. $175 
plus electricity, 
776-4776 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate to share 
two-bedroom duplex. 
Cal 776 0402. 

ONE NON-SMOKING female 
roommate need- 
ed lo share three 
bedroom apartment 
doe* to campus. Please 
carl 776-3421. 

ONE NON-SMOKING 
female. $134 per 
moMh plus one-fourth 
utilities. One and 
one-half block* from 
canepus. 776-2076. 

ONE- THREE non-smoking 
females, farm 

house, barn, pasture 
for horses, cattle, 
dogs Prefer Veterinary, 
Animal Science. 
Horticulture majors. 
Possible rent in ex- 
change for horse 
traiamg or light cattle 
and 

horse chore*. 776-1206, 
8pm- 9pm or P. 
O. Box 1211. 

OPENING FOH two male 
student roommates 
in atVee-becboom, one 

and one hall 

bath apartment in a 
complex 537-7087 
or 537-2470. 

ROOMMATE WANTED to 
share three-bed- 
room, own room, $116/ 
month plus one 
eighth utilities. 537 
9321 



SERIOUS. NON SMOKING 
female roommate 
to share a one-bedroom 
apartment-- par 
liaty furnished. Call 
539-7586. 

THREE-BEDROOM ON 
Hill-rest with two oth- 
er*, walking distance 
KSU Laundry 

tacflties, garage $235,' 
month. Leave 

message with Karen 
5397495 

TWO ROOMMATES needed 
immediately. 
Foiai bedroom house, 
one block from 
campus, own room; 



$175 plus one-fourth 

" . Travis 776-9319 
leave me* 




SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



205 



TUTORING HELP available 
for math, physics, 
and FORTRAN 

programming. Call 
Cheten 
at 537 1539 



MUSICIANS: RHYTHM 
guitar, keyboard, fid- 
dle, and steel player* 
needed for an es- 
ta bashed country band. 
539 7265 or 587 
0384. 

WANTED: ALTERNATES for 
(doo- wop) vocal 
group Need first tenor 
with high falsetto 
and low bass. Perform 
around slate, even 
ings and weekends. 
Good pay. 776 4999. 
537 1741. 



255-- 



210 



Typrni 



A FIVE minute walk from 
Aggieville. Pa- 

pers, letters $1 25 
double spaced. Same 
day siighity higher Ask 
about resume*. 
Call 776-1534. 

RECOGNIZE THIS? We're 
still here 1 Utilize 
my 6.S. in English/ 
Speech for papers/ 
editing, my ten years 
personnel man- 
agement for resume*. 
$1.25 double, let- 
ter quality. Call Janice 
537-2203 



A LITTLE extra cash for a 
chemistry text and a 
pitcher of beer. Cash 
Pawn ftGun, Inc., 
1917 Fl Riley Boulevard 

HEALTH ANO Auto 
Insurance. Call us be- 
fore buying the 
University Health Plan. 
Mufti- line Agency. 555 
Poyntr Suite 

215. Tim Engle 
537-4661 



3™ 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



IbVbbbK Waaffttaasej 



225 



letting 




Pregnane) 
Testing Center 

539-3338 

•I rvv ptvgiiauc} 

rvsltlli! 

' l.>i;ill\ oiniuli.iUi.il 

•Yniii t i.i\ fVittllH 

•t .ill Fm 



LJinpus in 
Anderson \ illaiu 



235 






DEPENDABLE, NON 
SMOKER needed to 
care for five year old 
after kindergarten, 
and eight year old after 
school in my 
home,, located near 
Amanda Arnold. Must 
have child care 
experience and own 
trans- 
portation, References 
required. Hours will 
be 11:20a.m. -6:30pm. 
Monday- Friday. 
Please call 5377354 
after 5:30p.m. for 
more information. 



240 



Mas l dans/Ms 



The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po 

in the Employment 
classification. Readers 
are advlsad to ap- 
proach any such 
employment opportunity 
with reasonable caution. 
The Collegian 

urges aur readers to 
contact the Batter 
Business Bureau, 501 SE 
Jefferson, Tope 

ha, KS 66607 1 190 
(913)232-0454 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

ASSET ANT with execu- 
tive secretary 

responsibilities. Full- 
time. 

Typing proficiency. 
Macintosh computer 
proficiency required. 
Apply in person 
with resume Sager 
Dental Associates 
P. A 51 4 Humboldt. 

BABYSITTER NEEDED for 
two children in my 
home. Prefer live in 
Must have time avail- 
able from 6a.m. to 
7:45a m and 3pm to 
6p.m. Monday- Friday 
Some nights and 
weekends needed 
Prefer college girl with 
rurM background Must 
be absolutely de- 
pendable I Need reliable 
transportation, ex- 
cellent driving record, 
non smoker Must 
enjoy children and have 
previous experi- 
ence References 
required. Call 776-0140 
before 9pm and leave 
message. 

CHILDCARE PROVIDER/ 
teacher aide for 
weekday church 

program involving inf- 
ants through preschool- 
age children 
Must be available 8:30 
to noon on Thurs 
day mornings. Potential 
for additional 
hours. ChilrJcare 
experience and refer 
enots required. Apply 



by August 31 at 
the First United 
Methodist Church, 6th 
and Poynti. 

CHILDCHILD/ NANNIES east 
coast nannies. 

NY, Conn., Long Island, 
and NJ areas. 
Live-in one year 
commitments. $150 and 
up per week. Immediate 
placements. In- 

terviews and 

applications call 
1800)858-2429. 

CHINESE RESTAURANT, 
kitchen help. Ex- 
perience preferred, part- 
time 539-2551 

COMPUTER SUPPORT and 
Programming po- 
sitions are available for 
K State students 
with a variety of skill*. 
Support Technicians 
must have good 
interpersonal skies, have 
experience with PCs 
and popular software 
packages like 

WordPerfect, Lotus. 
dBase 

Must have a firm 
understanding of 
MSOOS. and Windows, 
and have some 
programming skills. 
Software Developers 
and Network Assistants 
must have ex- 
perience with C C* * 
data based man- 
agement systems (SQL, 
dBase, Paradox) 
and with Novell, UNIX. 
MS-DOS. and Wind- 
owl. GUI programming 
experience in X or 
Windows 3.1 is 
especially helpful. 
Applica- 
tions will be available,' 
accepted until 

9/1/92 at 21 1 Umberger 
Hall. 

HOUSE HELPER needed for 
single mom four- 
five hour* a week for 
laundry, cleaning, 
and errands. Salary and 
hours negotiable 
Must be absolutely 
reliable Must nave 
laundry and cleaning 
experience. Prefer 
collage girl with rural 
background. Refer 
ence* required. Call 
776-0140 before 
9p.m. and leave 
message 

LEAD TEACHER for 
nationally accredited 
early childhood 
program, the successful 
candidate will have a 
four year degree in 
the educational field 
preferably early 
childhood education. 
Individuals must 
have experience 
teaching young child- 
ren in group situations 
Please send re- 
sume with cover tetter, 
collage tran- 

script* and three names 
of reference* to 
Martha Tannehill. 
Seven Dolor* Child- 
care/ Preschool, 220 
S. Juliette by 
Sept. 1 

LOOKING FOR advertising, 
public relations, 
or business major 
interested in being 
classified student 
advertising manager 
for the Kansas State 
Collegian adver- 
tising department. Must 
have a flexible 
schedule, be able to 
work at least 3- 4 
hours per day, and have 
excellent tele- 

phone skills. For 
applications and further 
information contact 
Annette or Gloria at 
532-6550 

MANHATTAN FLORAL is 
accepting appli- 
cations for a full-lime, 
year round secre- 
tarial position Apply 
in person at 630 
PoynU Ave. 

NATIONAL PUBLISHING 
company is seek- 
ing marketing personnel 
to work with pro- 



fessors and course 
instructors at Kan- 
sas State University. 
Position will re- 

3uire 2- 3 hours per 
ay. Must have 
strong customer 
support and interna- 
tional skills. Base pay 
and training are 
provided. Please send 
your resume to. 
CAP. P O Box 26340, 
Oklahoma City, 

OK 73126. 

OFFICE ASSISTANT, must 
be flexible, have 
a pleasing personality 
when dealing with 
the public and have 
some experience 
with small office 
procedures and com- 
puters. Apply at Seven 
Dolors Chiidcare 
Pre school, 220 S 
Juliette, through Aug. 
28, EOE. 

OFFICE STUDENT Help- 1- 
5, Monday- Fri- 
day. Musi have 
computer experience. 
$4,25/ hour. Contact 
Pal, 537 -7050 

PART- TIME Programmer/ 
Clerical help want- 
ed (15- 20 hours/ week, 
$4.55- $4 75/ hour 
depending on 

experience) 60 percent 
of 

duties will be 
programming: Writing/ 
main- 
taining PC- based 
programs and main- 
tenance of PC systems 
including installa- 
tion/ updating 
commercial software. 
40 

percent of duties will 
be clerical: Data en- 
try, operation of optical 
scanner and print- 
er, filing orders, word 
processing (Word- 
Perfect), typing, 
proofing, and some 
heavy 

lifting. Important: 
Applicants must be able 
to work full-time during 
all school breaks, 
including summer. 
Work Study preferred 
but not required. 
Applications available 
from the Center tor 
Faculty Evaluation & 
Development. College 
Court Building, 

room 16V 

PART-TIME HELP needed 
mornings, after- 
noons and evenings. 
Apply in person 
3530 East Highway 24 

PART-TIME HELP on 

commercial hog, cat 
tie and crop farm. 25 
miles northeast of 
Manhattan. Travel 
allowance given 
Farm experience 
helpful. Must have at 
least Fr«. afternoons 
available. Call 

4S7- 3440 before Se.m. 

PART-TIME MANAGER- to 
hire/ train sales 
and management 
personnel. Good com- 
munications skills 
required. Recorded 
message reveals details. 
537-2662 

PART TIME MASSAGE 
Therapist 10 to 12 
hours per week. 
afternoons. Will train 
Therapeutic Massage 
776-0022 

POSITION AVAILABLE 
immediately at Shop 
Quik Midnight shift 
$4.50/ hour, 4- mid- 
night or 3- 11 shift 
$4 25/ hour part-time 
2- 3 nights to start. 
Register experience 
preferred. Apply in 
person 1115 West 
port Suite B 

STUDENT COMPUTER 
Consultant, 15- 20 
hours per week, to start 
as soon as possi- 
ble, as a consultant for 
faculty, staff, and 
students. Selection 
criteria will be a com- 
bination of paid work 



experience. Micro- 
computer, mainframe, 
and UNIX knowl- 
edge, grade point 
average; and longevity 
potential. Applications 
will be accepted by 
Joyce Henderson, 
Room 26, Cardwell 
Hall, through August 
31. EOE 

VISTA DRIVE IN is now 
taking applications 
for full and part-time 
help Apply m per- 
son at 1911 Turtle Creek 
Blvd. 

WANTED: WORK-STUDY 
student for office 
duties. 10-12 hours a 
week. Apply at the 
Industrial Engineering 
Office. Borland 

237 before Aug. 31 



330 



The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advertisement* 
in the Employment 
classification Reader* 
are advised to ap- 
proach any such 
employment opportunity 
with reasonable caution. 
The Collegian 

urges our reader* to 
contact the Better 
Business Bureau, SOI SE 
Jefferson, Tope 

ka, KS 66607 1190 
(913)232-0454 

$200- $500 weekly Assemble 
product* at 

home. Easy! No selling 
You're paid di- 
rect. Fully guaranteed 
Free informa- 

tion— 24 hour hotline 
801-379-2900 
Copyright IKS13KDH 

ALASKA SUMMER 

employment— fisheries. 
Earn $5,000 plus/ 
month. Free Iranspor 
tationt Room and 
board* Over 6,000 
openings No 

experience necessary. 
Male or female. For 
employment program 
cell Student 

Employment Services at 
1- 

206 545 4155 ext. 
A5768 

ASSEMBLERS EXCELLENT 

income. easy 

work assembling 
products at home 
Seven day, 24-hour 

service. Information 
15041646-1700. Dept 
P6438 

POST ADVERTISING 
materials on campus 
Write: College 

Distributors. 33 Peboie- 
wood Trail, Naperville 
Illinois 60563 



VOW 1 RAISE $500-1 000 
IN JUST ONE WEEK' 



For your frai. 
somril). club, etc. 

Assist Ma rkc ung Firm 

running tun cvcrtl on 

campus fur Fortune 

500 Companies. 

FREE 

H l viX'HoSr RADIO 
juaI for calling 

1 -800-950-1037. esl. 25 




OPEN 
MARKET 





Classified Directory 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



<M© Amincerneffis 
MO Lost and Found 
0M Personals 
046 lyteettngstverrtt 
OM Par&es-n Mem 




HOUSING 
REAL ESTATE 



IBS For Rem - 

Apt Furnished 

110 ForRent- 

Apt Urtomtefied 



11t Rooms Available 
190 For Rent —Houses 
1t9 For Sate -Houses 

190 For Rem - 

Mobile Homes 

138 For Sale- 
Mobile Homes 

140 For Rent - Ga/age 

148 Roommate Wanted 

190 Sublease 

199 SUtte-fastum 

190 Office Space 

199 LandtorSaJe 




SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



futai 



119 ResumeVTypinn 

119 Desktop Pubtefciio 

120 Sewnp/Arteratiorts 

298 Ptap/iancy Testing 
290 LawnGare 

998 ChsdCare 

240 Muscian&'DJs 

949 PetServues 

990 Automotive Repair 

299 Other Services 




EMPLOYMENT, 
CAREERS 



310 Help Warned 
990 Volunteers Needed 



Opportunities 




OPEN 
MARKET 



408 Wanted to Buy 
410 Items for Sale 
419 Furniture to Buy/Sei 
490 GaragevYart Safca 
418 Auction 
490 Antiques 
499 Computet* 
440 Food Specials 
449 Muse Instruments 
490 Pes and Supplies 
499 Sporting Eu^pmervt 
490 Stereo Equipment 
498 Tickets to Buy/S*U 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 



910 Automobiles 
810 Bicycles 
990 Motorcycle* 
CarPooJ 




TRAVEL 
TRIPS 



910 Tout Packages 

920 Airplane Tickets 

930 Train Tickets 

440 Bus Tickets 



CATEGORIES 

To help you find what you are 
looking for, the classified ads 
have been arranged by category 
and sub -category All lategones 
are marked by one of the large 
•mages, and subcategories are 
preceded by a number 
designation 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always put what item or 
service you are advertising first 
This helps potential buyers find 
what they are looking for 

Don t use abbreviations Many 
buyers are confused by 
abbreviations. 

Consider including the price. 
This tees buyers il they are 
looking at something in their price 



WE DO NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS OR LAST NAMES IN 
PERSONALS. 






risen far tats 




CARPET FOR dorm room 
Gray, used one 
year. $50. Call 539 9700. 
9- 5 Monday- Fri- 
day. 

CARPET: 8'x 12* tight blue. 
One year old. For 
more information, call 
776-1389 

DOUBLE BED bunk. Nicely 
stained wood 

with attached matching 
ladder and alarm 
clock shelves. Very 
sturdy. S50. call 
53* 3316 

ENTERTAINMENT SET with 
CO player and 
dual cassette player. 
Comes with detach 
able speakers. $275 
539 4319. 

FOUR CUBIC foot 
refrigerator for sale. Ex 
cedent condition. $90 
Call 776 4266 

FUTON FULL sue. frame 
$90, matrass SSO 
Call Martina 537-2473, 
7p.m.- 10pm 

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS: 
Camoflage cloth- 
ing, field jackets, 
overcoats, new G.I 
boots, sleeping bags. 
Also CARMARTT 
workwear. Monday- 
Saturday. 9- 5. St. ' 
Marys Surplus Sales. 
St. Marys. KS. 
1-437-2734 

LOOK 3X5 metal desks 
formica tops, five 
drawers, for sale Call 
776-1700 or 

539-5046. leave 
message. 

TOPEKA DAILY Capital 
Semester Special 776- 
1552. 

WINDOW UNIT air 
conditioners for sale. 
28.000 BTU. 1300 14,000 
STU SSO. 

5,000 BTU, 110 volt. 
$75,7 76-9069 



AGGIES NEW TO YOU 
Second Hand Store 

537-8803 

■tic WIia.r^ "HI Bat 



415 



FurMtursta 

hnj/Sell 



FOR SALE: Table lamp, five- 
shelf bookcase, 
dub chair, swivel rocker, 
bedroom chair, 

black fireplace tools. 
Franklin fireplace 
uses wood or gas. 87 
piece disnes 457- 
3722 

GREEN AND white couch 
$50. two green 
swivel chairs $5 a piece 
539-6896 

NICE. COMFORTABLE 

couch, 7 feet long, 
SiOO Call, leave 
message. 537 1783 or 
532-6170 

TWIN BED for sale 
Complete. $75 or best 
off- 
er. Call 776-5582 and 
leave message. 

TWO KING- siie waterbeds. 
$75 each 

Small dormitory 
refrigerator. $66 or best 
offer. Schwinn Impact 
Pro, 21 inches. 
$400. 539 8762 

WHITE WICKER sin drawer 
tall lingerie 

chest. Excellent 
condition. Great dealt 
539-3075 

WOHLER*S USED Furniture. 
615 North 3rd. 
539-3119 Open 10a.m.- 
6p.m. Monday 

Friday, until 8p.m 
Thursdays: Saturday- 
Sunday 1- 5pm 



Wohlers 
Used Furniture 

Open M-F 10-6 
Thursdays til 8 p.m. 
Sat St Sun 1-5 p.m. 
615 N. 3rd 539-31 IB 



420 



fiarsee/YanJ 



WE DON'T have room! 
Many items like new. 
8x13' blue carpel, 
appliances, full sued 
bed, couch, chair, pkobc 
crates, com- 

pact vacuums, phones, 
coolers, drawing 
paper, tile folders. 
curtains and much 
more. Call 776-7573 tor 
more informa- 

tion. 



435 



386SX, VGA, two MB ram. 
39MB HD. five 
and one- fourth inch and 
three and one- 
half inch dnves, mouse, 
modem. $1250 

or bast offer Call 
539-7795. 

IBM-PC. COLOR screen, 
keyboard, mouse, 
Epson printer $550. 
Doug 537-7064. 




INTERESTED IN owning a 
pet, but cata and 
dogs aren't allowed ? 
Get a rabbit, they 
are a great substitute 
Call 539- 7 128 

SAVE $88 on a 55- gallon 
aquarium w/ hood 
and fluorescent lights 
Complete set up for 
$259 99. Pets n Stuff 
1105 Waters. 539 
9494 




SOLOFLEX COMPLETE like 
new $750. 

537-7675 (after 

5 30pm I 




CD PLAYER- Techrks, single 
disc pro 

grammable. remote 
compatible. $100 or 
best offer 532-2573. 
Jon. 

FOR SALE: Alpme pull-out 
car stereo. Clan 
on three-ways. Like 
new. Make offer 
776-0757. 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 




1976 DODGE Dart 71,000 
miles. Runs well 
$1000 or best offer call 
539 8333 

1978 IMPALA 36a automatic 
transmission 
Best offer Call 539-2453 
before 11a. m 

or after 6p.m. 

CHEAP! FBI/ U.S. seized 
1989 Mercedes 

$200. 1986 VW $50, 
1987 Mercedes 

$100. 1965 Mustang 
$50 Cnoose from 
(house nd s sta rti ng $25 
Free information 
24 hour hotline 1801 1 
379 2929 Copy 
right number KS13IUC 

VW BUG 1975. new. rebuilt 
engine, good in- 
terior, $1350, call 
Martina 537-2473 
7p.m.- 10pm 




12- SPEED Elite tour bicycle 
new- $125 or 
best offer. 1913)785 
2604. 

1990 TREK 1100 58 cm 
Shimano 105. Call 
7787091, 

GOOD TOURING 12 speed 
bike. Nishiki In 
lernetional, suntour 
components $195 
Doug Fox 537-7054. 

TWO 20 inch ten- speed 
bicycles. Good Con 
dition $50 each. 539 
5078 after 7p.m. 

WOMEN'S 10- speed: 2T 
Fuji, ridden less 
than 50 mites, perfect 
condition $90. 776- 
9435 




1990 HONDA CBR 600, 
excellent condition. 
$2950. 537 9674. 

1992 ZX7 Ninje. Showroom 
condition match- 
ing cover, helmeL TOO* 
miles, under war- 
ranty $6500. Days 
539- 1926, evenings 
537-0343 ask for Bntt 



GET 
THE 
WORD 
OUT 




• 



August 26, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




# 






SALDDN 



Welcome Back Party! 

Rusty'© way of saying 

WELCOME 0ACK STUOBNTSl 
WEPNE6PAY 

•Ladies' Night 

*25$ Hamburgers from 5-3p.m. 
*100 FREE Last Chance Tanks 

given to first 100 ladies 
through the door at 10 p.m. 

*$1.50 Weiis ~~ 

*$1 Shots 

*$2.75 Big 3eers 





NO COVER! NEVER HAD IT! NEVER WILL! 



1213 Mora 
AggieviUe 



! 





'■ 



y 



— 



\ 






CkmsasstattLJ^ 
OLLEGIAN 



HEAD \^y 
TO \P 

HEAD 



I K-Succ nuy ittrt an All Big 
htc 

IMQI 6 




AUGUST 27, 1992 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99, NUMBER 4 



i 






I 



CAMPUS 



Paperwork 
delays new 
roof for 
Denison 



DIANE DENISON 



Collegun 

Paperwork is the only thing delaying 
completion of the last of the roofs on campus that 
were scheduled to be replaced or repaired during 
the last fiscal year. 

Renovations for seven roofs were budgeted 
$275,000 during the 1992 fiscal year. Only one 
remains to be done. 

Denison Hall is the only project not yet 
started. The roofs replacement has been delayed 
because of contractor paperwork. 

"The first contractor went bankrupt, so we had 
to go with another bid. and the second contractor 
will be delayed until mid-September," said Ed 
Rice, assistant vice president of Physical 
Facilities. 

Buildings with new roofs are the James R. 
Macdonatd Laboratory at Cardwell Hall, 
Shellenberger Hall and parts of Seaton Court. 
The Chester E. Peters Recreation Complex is 
under contract for a new roof, and the roofs of 
Bushnell and Dvkstra halls have been repaired. 

The average roof lasts 20 years, and K-State 
has approximately 80 roofs, which would require 
the repair of four roofs per year. Rice said. 

Four buildings are scheduled to get new roofs 
this year. A budget of $310,000 has been 
allocated for Kedzie Hall, the west wing of 
Waters Hall, the An Building and more of Seaton 
Court. 

Roofs on the KSU Foundation building, 
Dickens Hall and half of Abeam Field House will 
be replaced during the 1994 fiscal year. There is 
a budget of $487,000 for these buildings and 
$240,000 of it is for Aheam. 

In November. Dickens received major water 
damage. It is not scheduled for a new roof until 
the 1993-1994 school year because the problem 
is not the roof, but the interior roofs drains. 

"Everything is fine as long as they keep the 
drains free." said Duane Nell is, head of the 
department of geography. 

Interior damage to Nellis' office has been 
repaired, but other rooms remain in need of 
painting and repair on the second floor of 
Dickens. 

A record 39 days of rain during June and July, 
7.68 inches above the norm, had little effect on 
the roofs this summer. Rice said. 

The rain was slow and steady enough to only 
cause the insulation in Denison to become wet 



IMMMMMHBH 



■'» - i.«3" 



Products showcased for students 



and need replacing. 




CARY COMOWRColtegw 



Michele LWH), an employee of Market Source, sets up a tent's framework Wednesday morning tor today's Campus Fest. 



Giveaways, samples, free food 

abound at Union's Campus Fest today 



ColltJUn 

Campus Fest hits the K -State 
campus today, luring students into 
various booths for free food, 
product samples, giveaways and 
more. 

The festival, sponsored by the 
K -State Union Bookstore, is a two- 
day event featuring 22 different 
local, regional and national 



companies ranging from computer 
software to candy bars to cologne. 

Campus Fest runs from 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. in Union Plaza. 

Kay Farley, Union Bookstore 
manager, said Campus Fest visited 
the grounds only two years ago 
and found the experience exciting. 
She also said student feedback was 
positive. 

The Bookstore pays to bring the 



festival to K-State. and vendors 
pay to participate, she said. 

Appreciation is only one reason 
why Campus Fest comes lo K- 
State. Farley said. 

"It's brought to campus to 
provide excitement for the 
beginning of school," she said. 
"The excitement it creates is 
wonderful. It's kind of our Mj at 
saying we're glad you're back and 
have a good time this year." 

MarketSource Corp. of 
Cranbury, N.J.. organizes the 
event, which tours 50 university 



campuses in the fall and 10 in the 
spring, said event coordinator 
Michele Lane. 

Lane said one of her favorite 
aspects of Campus Fest is working 
with students and seeing that 
everyone walks away happy. 

Karen Meyer, director of event 
marketing, said students' reactions 
to products are enjoyable. 

"I enjoy coming out to see the 
students' reaction," she said. 
"Students seem surprised or find it 
unexpected to get free samples," 



■ Campus 
Fest will be 
from 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. In 
Union Plaza, 
between 
Seaton Hall 
and the 
Union. 



KANSAS 



fflBW 



'ammmmmmmmaammmmsm 



Finney praises, 
challenges women 



"America's 
heritage Is 
richer for 
the parti- 
cipation of 
Kansas 
women." 

GOV. JOAN FINNEY 



TAP MUMIWHnS 

Coltepm 

Gov. Joan Finney praised 
women's achievements and 
challenged them to continue their 
work in a speech Wednesday at 
Fort Riley. 

She addressed about 90 men 
and women as the keynote speaker 
for the 1992 Women's Equality 
Day celebration. 

The 1st Infantry Division and 
Fort Riley sponsored the event 
Wednesday afternoon at the 
Leader's Club at Fort Riley. 

The event commemorated the 
19th Amendment, which gave 
women the right to vote. 

Morris Boyd, assistant division 
commander at Fort Riley, made 



opening remarks about Women's 
Equality Day by quoting baseball 
legend Yogi Berra. Berra 
mistakenly said, upon receiving an 
award, that he would like to thank 
all those "who have made this day 
necessary," instead of possible. 

"Maybe Yogi wasn't too far off 
the mark," Boyd said. "Today we 
gather to reflect on some key 
events that make a day like today 
possible. But, at the same time, I 
think we have to reflect on the fact 
that in order to go forward, days 
like today are definitely 
necessary." 

Boyd mentioned important 

women of Fort Riley and Kansas 

who have contributed to the 

■ S« FINNEY page «) 




No-fly zone declared 



BAGHDAD, Iraq — Baghdad newspapers today 
denounced the United States and its allies for their plan to 
protect Shiite Muslims by blocking Iraqi planes from the 
southern skies. 

President Bush officially announced the ultimatum in 
Washington and said it would begin in 24 hours. At the 
United Nations in New York, Iraqi Ambassador Abdul 
Al-Amir Al-anbari was summoned to the French U.N. 
mission to receive a communication about the "no-fly 
zone" from the U.S.. British, French and Russian envoys. 

"Our great people are on a stale of alert, unified and 
angry along with their leadership and armed forces and 
are ready to fight the enemies and to foil their Zionist- 
imperialist schemes," said Al-Thawra, the organ of the 
ruling Baath party. 

The allied move comes amid steady Western 
condemnation of President Saddam Hussein over his 
treatment of the Shiites in the southern marshlands and 
his reluctance to admit U.N. weapons inspectors to Iraqi 
ministries as required under Gulf War cease-fire 
resolutions. 

The warning tells Iraq to clear the skies south of the 
32nd parallel or risk attacks in the air. In Washington, the 
State Department said Iraq had essentially moved all its 

■ See IRAQ page 9 



THE 38TH PARALLEL 

As of today, Iraqi airplanes will not be allowed to fly south 
of the 38th parallel. U.N. forces headed by the United 
States and Britain will enforce the policy. 




omqorv a- MMMMMOofctfaa 



4. KYt* i*i*i I 

GOV. Joan Finney speaks on women's roles In government at Fort Riley Wednesday. 



NEWS DIGEST 


► ANDREW LOSES STRENGTH 


►STATE PRIMARY RESULTS IN 


NEW IBERIA. La (AP> a tropical storm 


TOPEKA(AP) — Sen. 


showed Wednesday 


— Hurricane Andrew Wednesday afternoon 


Bob Dole won the 


John Reinhart, spokes- 


carved its way through after its winds dropped 


Republican renomination 


man for the Secretary of 


here Wednesday, below the hurricane 


in Kansas' Aug. 4 primary 


State's office, said Michael 


throwing tornadoes at a threshold of 74 mph . By 


election with just over 8*0 


Alan Smith ot Manhattan 


1 00-mile-wide target and evening, the storm was 


percent of the vote. His 


resigned his nomination in 


pumping torrents of rain. centered near Natchez. 


Democratic opponent, 


the 22nd state senatorial 


Andrew, the nation's Miss. 


Gloria O'Dell. won her 


district. Incumbent 


costliest natural disaster One death was 


primary with nearly 70 


Republican Lana Oteen 


ever, was downgraded to reported in Louisiana. 


percent, official returns 


was renominated 



August 27. 1092 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






L 



PEOPLE 



J 



Glasscock recognized, 
named to program 



SHANNON WILSON 



Colleton 

Rep. Kent Glasscock. R- 
Manhattan, was recently chosen as 
one of 35 nationally recognized 
representatives to attend the Toll 
Fellowship Program for young state 
leaders. 

Glasscock was asked by the 
Council of State Governments to 
attend the week- long program from 
Aug. 29 through Sept. 3 in 
Lexington, Ky It is designed to 
prepare today's new leaders for 
continued government service 
and/or for higher office, CSG 
executive director Dag Ryen said, 

Ryen said the Toll Program is a 
training and developmental 
program for young and dynamic 
leaders. 

"The participants discuss how 
the role of state government has 
evolved and its implications to the 
fabric of American society," he 
said. 

Each year, eight state leaders 
from West, South, East and 
Midwest regions are nominated by 
committees. 

The leaders can represent any of 
the three branches of state 
government. 

CSG then nominates a secretary 
of state, lieutenant governor and 
state treasurer. 

The program is designed to 
provide interaction between state 
leaders and to evaluate etch to 
determine his or her personal 
strengths, Ryen said. 

Glasscock, who was nominated 
by the Midwest Committee, said he 
is excited by the prospect of 
meeting with some of today 's most 




Glasscock 



influential state leaders. 

"There are some inescapable 
good feelings," Glasscock said. 
"Whenever you get the chance to 
rub intellectual elbows with the 
brightest from around the country, 
you can't help but benefit. 

"My goal is probably threefold," 
Glasscock said, 
"One is to meet 
people from 
across the 
country 
involved in 
state 
government and 
see what they 
are doing. 

"Second. I 
hope to gain 
some sense of 
what the trends 

are nationally in state government." 
Glasscock said. "And finally, I 
want to increase my own leadership 
skills so I can become a better 
legislator and more perceptive 
member of government here in 
Kansas." 

One of the issues Glasscock said 
he is looking forward to is talking 
with other leaders about education, 
about what they are doing to 
improve education in their states. 

Although Glasscock said he the 
program will help him better serve 
his constituents in the 62nd district, 
he has no plans for higher office. 

"1 don't have any plans to," 
Glasscock said. "1 am honored to 
serve at my present capacity. If, at 
some future time, there was a 
situation in which 1 was asked to 
serve, I would certainly took into 
it." 



MMtdMMMliaatiMMkHt 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 



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puBMftM Of Skidd* PuMcawna me. Kmm Hal 103 Marwaaan. Kan . MSOC T*» Coaayan a 
puMaftad wakdan <Ming <n* kxosi raar ana one* * *••* ffmug" aw nmw Saawd aau 
po*t*e* it pati at Manhamn Kan B6SCJ 

POSTMASTER Sana attna* manga* to Kanaat Saw Co"ag*v Cwunaon ea». Kadza 1U. 
Manhattan, Kan . aSSOe-7187 

NawtsonMuaon* web* aoeapM by W a p n o na. (913) S32-6SS*. of ■ ma CMagwt m— p o m , 
KaosaMafi tie 

mquiflM eonoanng local, natonal and ottaftad daplii aduim a mg ihou« &t anewd » ;»' 3) 
OMSK 



1 POL ICE REPORTS , 

K-simroucE 

These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the KSU Police 
Department. Because of incomplete information in the log, not all campus 
crimes arc listed here. 
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 



At 3:10 p.m. a bicycle was 
reported «tot*n from the bike rack on 
th« north side of the K- State Union. 
Lou m $354. 

At 327 p.m. a bicycle was 

RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



reported stolen from the north side ot 
Btuemont Hell. Loss was $65. 

At 6:25 p.m. a bookbsg and Its 
contents were reported stolen from 
West Stadium 123 Loss was $199. 



CAMPUS BULLETIN 



These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the Riley County 
Police Department. Because of space constraints, not all crimes appearing 
in the log are published. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 



Af 1 A3 a.m. an employee at Last 
Chance Saloon, 1213 Moro St., 
reported a fight on the premises. 

At 329 a.m. en employe* of Saint 
Mary Hospital emergency room, 
reported s battery that occurred at 
Last Chance Saloon, 121 3 Moro St.. 

At 10:11 a.m. Phil Elchman, 27D4 
Hobos Drive, reported e peat theft of 
• 24-foot extension isdder from 
Vic, Horizon Construction company, 
3901 Berbers Lane. Loss was $260. 

At 11:14 a.m. Christopher P. 
Gilbert, 6710 E. U.S. Hlghwsy 24, was 
laauid a notice to appear for criminal 
trespass at 100 Manhattan Town 
Center. 

At 12:52 p.m. Kurt Feltrttr, 1925 
Plymouth Road, reported tomatoes 
were thrown et his house and thst his 
house wss toilet papered, 

At 1 JO pm. Rhonda Mullln, 1604 
Den holm Ave., reported a theft of four 
pebo end pool swivel-seat bar stools. 



Loss was Si ,200. 

At 3:17 p.m. Mary May, 1200 
Fremont St. No. 16, reported a vehicle 
burglary. Taken wss miscellaneous 
,ewelry valued at $1,191. 

Al 3:58 p.m. Stanley Wstklns, 2138 
Prairie Glen Place, reported the theft 
of an extension ladder. Loss was $80 

At 3:59 p.m. a terroristic threat, 
battery and criminal damage to 
property report was filed. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 

■ Student Senate will meet at 7 p.m. in Union Big 8 Room. 

■ Campus Crusade for Christ will meet at 7 p.m. in Throckmorton 
131. 

■ College of Education will meet at 6 p.m. in Bluemont 101. 

■ Vietnamese Student Association will meet at 7:30 p.m. in the 
International Student Center. 

■ Provost's Role and Aspiration Committee invites faculty, staff 
and students to view the Program Review documents in Farrell 
Library reserve section, 

■ Career Planning and Placement will sponsor placement 
orientation meetings for seniors in agriculture at 4:30 p.m. in Waters 
231 and at 7 p.m. In Waters 244.. 

■ K- State Ambassadors and Ag Reps will have a meeting for all 
continuing members at 6 p.m. in Waters 137. 

■ At- Anon will meet from 12:05 p.m. to 1 p.m. in Lalene 231. 

■ BaGaLs will meet at 7:30 p.m. in the UFM fireplace room. 

■ CampusFest will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Union Plaza. In 
case of rain, it will be in the Union Main and West ballrooms. 

■ K-State Water Ski Club will have an informational meeting at 8 
p.m. in Union 207. 

■ Intramural Manager's Meeting will be at 4 p.m. in Union Utile 
Theatre. 

■ K-State Pre-Vet Club will meet at 7 p.m. in Trotter 201. Sunset 
Zoo Director Don Wixom will speak. 

■ KSU Parachute Club will have a business meeting at 7 p.m. in 
Union 204. 

■ Southwind will have an organizational meeting at 7 p.m. in the 
ECM building at 1021 Denison Ave. 

■ K-State Rowing Association will have a recruitment and 
informational meeting at 7 p.m. in Denison 1 13A. 

■ United Black Voices gospel choir will perform at noon in the 
Union Courtyard. 



WEATHER 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 



TODAY'S FORECAST 

Today, some low clouds and tog early otherwise decreasing 
cloudiness Warmer High in the mtd-7Qs. North wind 10 to 
1 5 mph, Thursday night and Friday dear. Low Thursday 
night in the mid-50s 

TOMORROWS FORECAST 

Warmer still. High 80-85 





EXTENDED FORECAST 

Saturday through Monday: 
Lows in the 50s. 





MANHATTAN 


TOPEKA 


GOODLAND 


64/56 


67/61 W 

KANS* 
CITY 


68/52 • 


RUSSELL 




63/53 


64/60 


GARDEN CITY 






68/55 


WICHITA 

67/59 






COFFEYVILLE 1 






^ 73/66 




Little or no rain Highs 80 to 85 



WORLD TEMPERATURES 

CITY TEMPS SKY Hong Kong 
Auckland 59/52 rain Jo'burg 



90 82 



64/43 



clear 



Budapest 



93-75 



dear Rome 



97/66 



dear 



Caracas 



86/66 



clear Toronto 



83/66 



cloudy 



; 



KSU WILDCAT 



SOCCER 

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Aug. 27 5-6 p.m. 
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35. Chicken, Pork, or Baal..... $4.75 

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HEWLETT 
PACKARD 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 27, 1902 £ 



I 



Senior studies 
farm methods 
in homeland 



i 






"In today's 
global 
economy, 
you never 
know when 
you'll have a 
Job that 
requires you 
to have 
firsthand 
knowledge 
of Europe." 

ARLOBIERE 



Colkfai 

Dan Dostie, senior in agricultural 
technology management, went back to 
his roots last year when he studied in 
Toulouse, France. 

The city is only 60 miles from the 
village his forefathers emigrated from 
two centuries ago. Dostie's ancestor, a 
captain in the military, left France in 
1754 to fight for new land in North 
America. 

Ten generations later in 1991. Dostie 
returned to leam from the French how 
to better farm in America. 

Dostie is the first in his family to 
return to France since 1 754, as well as 
the first K-Stater to go overseas through 
the agricultural economics program. 

Although Dostie said he found many 
differences in farming techniques and 
crop patterns, there were some French 
customs he recognized from his father's 
stories. One of those customs was the 
afternoon siesta, when most of 
southwestern France takes a short nap, 
he said. 

L'Ecole Superieure d'Agriculture, 
the Bench school where Dostie studied, 
found three families for him to live with 
during a five-month internship in the 
village of Labanhcre, 

He worked at two grape vineyards 
and a dairy farm. After milking cows, 
making hybrid strains of seed corn, and 
perfecting his French for five months, 
Dostie moved to Toulouse. 

For the last half of the year, he 
attended school and lived with other 
foreign exchange students from 
Hungary, Italy. Spain. Canada and 
Czechoslovakia. 

Dostie was one of 450 students at the 
small private agricultural school. 

"1 felt like I was in high school 
again," he said. 

All students attended class from 8 
a.m. to 5 p.m. in the same lecture hall 
five days a week. Since courscwork was 
structured rigidly, taking optional 



classes happened less frequently than at 
K -State. There was only one exam each 
semester. 

The internship program was very 
demanding, Dostie said, as all French 
students were expected to get an 
internship every summer and a six- 
month internship the last year of the 
program. 

Students then write an in-depth paper 
similar to a master's thesis at the 
conclusion of the five-year program. 

He said K-State's professors seemed 
generally more qualified to teach than 
those in France. French teachers are 
often professionals who are invited to 
teach because of their knowledge, he 
said, but who have no training to be 
professors. 

Many trained government officials 
spoke on the new economic order 
emerging in Europe as a result of the 
breakdown of trade barriers. 

One advantage of France's intensive 
program is that each class got to go to 
the foreign country they studied. Dostie 
said. 

Dostie's class studied Irish 
agricultural policies, and then visited 
agricultural firms in Ireland for a week 
in May. 

Arlo Biere. professor of agricultural 
economics, said an agreement between 
K-State's agricultural economics 
program and, I'Ecole Superieure 
d'Agriculture allowed Dostie to pay K- 
State tuition for a visiting French 
student while the French student paid 
Dostie's tuition in Toulouse. 

K-State has was host to 1 1 French 
students through the agricultural 
economics program, and Biere said it 
has added an international dimension to 
the department. 

"In today's global economy, you 
never know when you'll have a job that 
requires you to have firsthand 
knowledge of Europe," Biere said. 
"We're very encouraged by the 
program." 




MARGJUtET CLAfUUM CoUe<J*i 



Dan Dostie. senior in agricultural technology management, stands in one of the alleys between bams of 
milking cows at the KSU Dairy Teaching and Research Center Wednesday afternoon. 



». 

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■M 







PINION 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Tht opinions expressed in 'In Our Opinion* are the 
members These views do not necessarily represent the 
Pubeoatone Inc. or the A.Q .Miller Scnooi ot Joumaliern and 

*MMUmsssssssssssss«BMssssssssssssssssssssss«IHsl 



of e majority of Editorial Board 
Of Kanaaa Stale University, Student 
Communications 



Samantha Branson Erin Perry 
Editor in Cfctsf 



Jared Savage 
GpWon Pagt Ed** 



Richsnl Andntdc John Han 
Amy Cox Jodel! timer Tom Lister 

Shawn Bruce David Msyet Mark Eneler 
Frank Kleemann Derek Thomin David RUipi 
Brian Andcnon Julie Long Marti Giaoobe 



Cokjrniw are the opinions of 


only the ooxjmnM Tney do not 


reflect ihe vwwt oi t* Kansas 


Stale Coseoien, but instead oeer • 


OJIWktlQ MaMpOstft 



AUGUST 27,1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



In Our Opinion 



By the Collegian Editorial Board 






Go driving; take your chances 



THE ISSUE 




Once again, the season to run the gauntlet 
across Manhattan Avenue from campus is upon 
us. 

So is the suicide run of trying to go to Wal- 
Mart and get through the Bluemont, Third Street, 
and Tunic Creek Boulevard traffic . And now, a 
new wrinkle has been added to mis danger zone: 
Sonic Drive-In. 

For sure, a large number of persons and 
Frankie Avalon groupies are overjoyed to see the 
arrival of the Sonic on Third Street. But the 
location couldn't be in a worse place. Before, it 
was just a matter of waiting to clear the 
intersections. Now, it will be drivers taking their 
lives into their own hands when they venture to 
this portion of Manhattan. 

Needless to say, the return of thousands of 
college students at once creates more than a few 
traffic snarls. This problem has been further 
complicated by the overabundance of unmarked 
intersections throughout the city, pedestrians who 
enjoy reading while crossing the street, and a 
severe lack of parking spaces in and around 



Aggieville. 

Sonic being put where it is only adds to an 
already impossible quagmire that at times makes 
Manhattan, Kan., look like Manhattan, New 
York. 

So where does the city go from here? 

The time has since passed to place, at least, 
pedestrian crosswalks on Manhattan Avenue, so 
that students who live east of campus don't have 
to calculate windows of opportunity to make it 
across alive. Asking for a stoplight would 
probably be out of the question, since there's 
already plenty on the west side of campus. 

And whatever happened to logical city 
planning that kept new construction away from 
already traffic -congested areas? Manhattan would 
be well-advised to take a second look at an 
intersection before it goes and gives out building 
permits. 

So pedestrian and driver beware: If yon 
drive, map out your route or you might not make 
it home till Christmas. And if you walk and read 
at the same time, LOOK UP! 



Readers Write 



► CRIME 



Strong action needed from Congress now 



Editor. 

For almost a year now. 
comprehensive anti-crime 
legislation has been stalled in 
Congress, while the spread of 
violent crime is foremost in the 
minds of many Americans as 
one of the greatest threats to our 
comm unites. 

Partisan bickering and 
inaction on crime legislation has 
added not only to the dis- 
satisfaction with government in 
general, but underscores a sense 
of helplessness people feel. 
Images of violent crimes 
reinforce the view that its level 
is rising unchecked. 

Certainly, there is little 
evidence to suggest that progress 
is being made in the war against 
crime, and Congress must bear 
the responsibility for failing to 
take action. But the truth of the 
matter is that even if the current 
crime bill becomes law. it will 
only be a small step toward. 

For example, the crime bill 
calls for the death penalty for 
more than 50 crimes, for 
everything from genocide to 
using weapons of mass de- 
struction. In actuality, it will 
only apply to a small number of 
cases, as most murder cases are 
tried in state courts. 



The crime bill also provides 
for a waiting period prior to the 
purchase of a handgun, which 1 
have long supported. However, 
this would not be a cure-all for 
stopping crimes involving 
handguns. Finally, ate we 
willing to pay the $3-billion 
price for law enforcement, 
prison construction, and boot 
camps for youthful offenders? 

What can we do? People 
must feel safe in their com- 
munities and secure in their 
homes. To effectively fight 
crime, criminals must know they 
will be caught and punished if 
they break the law. 

Additional funding will not 
be enough. We must also make 
better use of existing funds. 
Among other things, we must 
acknowledge that last year, it 
cost $25 billion in federal, state 
and local funds to operate 
existing prisons and jails. 

It is time to make some hard 
choices — to set priorities, 
reallocate resources, engage in 
long-range planning. I believe 
that we must attack crime and 
lawlessness — our communities, 
our families, and our children 
demand it. 

Sen. Nancy Landon 
Kassebaum 



Civil liberties groups 
are the real censors 




j 



JOHN 

Hart 



When rap singer Ice-T was 
forced to pull the song 
"Cop Killer" off his "Body 
Count" album earlier this month, 
civil liberties groups responded in 
predictable knee-jerk fashion and 
bowled censorship. 

The enemy was the same. Once 
again those radical, fascist 
conservatives were on the hunt, 
ready to devour anyone who dared 
to speak out against the 
establishment. 

Yet, it's ironic that the same 
people who cried censorship over 
the Ice-T issue and self- righteously 
exalted themselves as America's 
civil liberties protectors have in 
recent years been among the most 
active censors in the country. 

The most censored group in 
America today is not the music 
industry, the National Endowment 
for the Arts or even the KKK. but 
those who espouse J udeo- Christian 
values. There is an obvious bias 
toward these values in America 
today. Across the nation, civil 
liberties groups are attempting to 
purge Christianity from the public 
sector. For example, in dozens of 
cities the ACLU has prohibited the 
display of Christmas nativity 
scenes, which are usually bought 
with private funds. 

Neutrality toward religion in the 
public sector, especially education, 
it a joke. Our schools reek of an 
anti-Christian bias. During my 
senior year in high school I was 
prohibited from using the word 
"God" in a column. Now. 
Christmas break is called "winter 
break." Thanksgiving is no longer 
a holiday remembered for the 
pilgrims thanking God for their 
blessings, but is instead known as 
the day the pilgrims thanked the 
Native Americans for helping them 
grow vegetables. 

Of course, all this censorship is 
justified by the separation of church 
and stale. What 1 find interesting, 
though, is that a separation of 
church and state clause can't be 
found in the Constitution. The First 
Amendment reads, "Congress shall 
make no law respecting an 
establishment of religion, or 
prohibiting the free exercise 
thereof; or abridging the freedom of 
speech ... .** 

The separation of church and 
state idea comes from the first 
clause. The intent of the clause was 
to prevent Congress from 
establishing an official state 
religion supported by taxes. Today, 
the First Amendment has been 
stretched to include a "separation" 



of religion and government or a 
freedom from religion. This 
illogical line of thinking has lead to 
the direct violation of the next two 
clauses, free exercise of religion 
and freedom of speech, especially 
when used by religious people. 

Besides flagrantly violating the 
intent of the First Amendment by 
creating a self-serving separation of 
church and state clause, civil 
liberties groups have even violated 
their own erroneous interpretation 
of the Constitution, Humanism, the 
belief that man and his universe are 
self- sufficient and self-sustaining, is 
being taught in our schools. In the 
humanism manifestos, humanists 
have claimed that their belief is a 
religion, a claim the Supreme Court 
has upheld. So how can humanism 
be taught in our schools that are 
both neutral to religion and 
separated from religion? 

Double standards and 
hypocrisies are at the heart of 
modern anti-censorship thinking. 
The National Endowment for the 
Arts vs. Sen. Jesse Helms issue is 
the quintessential example of anti- 
censorship doublethink. 

Helms proposed a congressional 
ban on ihe use of public money to 
circulate obscene materials or 
materials that would blaspheme 
religion. One publicly funded 
photographer, Andres Serrano, is 
best known for his work depicting a 
crucifix submerged in a flask of 
urine. The proposal did not state 
that artists like Serrano could not 
produce such material. That would 
be censorship. Helms merely 
proposed that he shouldn't have to 
pay for material that desecrates his 
religious beliefs. How would the 
public respond if it were asked to 
pay for art depicting John F. 
Kennedy submerged in a flask of 
urine? 

I strongly oppose censorship. I 
support the rights of others to 
express ideas I disagree with and 
find offensive. I even applaud the 
civil liberties groups for fighting 
individuals and organizations who 
are attempting to lake away 
people's freedom of speech. God 
created man with a mind so he 
could reason and express his 
thoughts. Nevertheless, no 
freedom, including the freedom of 
speech, is absolute. Should 
freedom of privacy be upheld in 
cases of child abuse? No. The truth 
is that the freedom of expression is 
forcefully defended by civil 
liberties groups as long as you 
express an opinion with which they 
agree. 




Pure Food not the answer 



The Pure Food Campaign says it is trying to protect 
you. Don't believe it 
The campaign is led by one thousand of America's 
top chefs and is organized to fight against that great blight on 
haughty cuisine — genetically engineered food. The menus at 
the chefs' trendy restaurants are stamped with a double helix 
with a slash through it. advertising their boycott against 
bioengineered food, which they consider impure. 

Most people couldn't care less about this culinary 
discrimination. Normally, such a tiny 
story wouldn't merit any serious 
attention, even from me. But the Pure 
Food Campaign's rejection of 
biotechnology is an example of a stupid 
profit gimmick that could wreck the 
planet and give us all a nasty day. 

These chefs think bioengineering is 
weird. The very word generates images 
of two-headed babies. Even if 
biotechnology works on an organism, a 
tomato that tastes like a carrot would 
wreak havoc with their recipes. 

Bioengineering is different, though 
not in the way they think. Researchers 
working with genetic manipulation of 
food plants are not going to create 
psucdo-broccoli to take over the Rose 
Garden, and brussels sprouts spores will not become the next 
Andromeda Strain. These scientists who work with food 
plants, including a few on our campus, mainly want to find 
ways to feed more people. By splicing protein genes into 
different breeds of plants, they can create wheat that is more 
resistant to drought or rice with greater nutritional value. With 
careful planning, geneticists can even create plants that are 
healthy for us but that kill bugs dead when they try to eai 




JOHN 

Hawks 



them. 

For starving people in drought-stricken countries, these 
traits are important. As the world's population continues to 
rise, they will become even more important as we try to feed 
more people. It is certainly true that we need to control our 
population, but it would be nice if we could curb starvation as 
well. 

Thus, the Pure Food Campaign, with its rejection of bio- 
engineered food, is thumbing its nose not only at American 
biotechnical research, but also at hungry people around the 
world. Drawing on their chic, environmentally-correct 
clientele with their slashed double-helix stamps, these chefs 
are doing anything but protecting the public from food 
impurities. Instead, by raising questions among the public 
about biotechnology, they are limiting their green 
consciousness to the dollars on the bottom line. 

The Pure Food Campaign's position is more than greedy 
and nonconstructive. With its rejection of a technology that 
could save or improve the lives of millions of needy people, it 
almost seems like racism. The campaign encourages 
"cultured" Americans to dissociate themselves from the 
troubles faced by other peoples around the world. By doing 
so, it perpetuates the presence of an elite group of people — 
namely, us — who waste more energy and resources than 
anyone else on the planet. 

Hopefully, though, poetic justice will prevail. Skillfully 
applied genetic engineering is already reducing the need for 
chemical pesticides and herbicides and may one day limit the 
use of artificial preservatives. Those chefs in the campaign 
who do not use exclusively organically grown food products 
are therefore increasing their dependence on these chemicals. 
So, their attempt to protect their patrons from impurities 
actually may have the reverse effect. 

If not, we can always hope that they choke. 






c . 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



August 27, 1002 C 






Food research lab helps Kansas industries 



PAULA 

Collegitti 

You might smell soup cooking in 
Sea ton Hall these days. 

Asparagus soup is being made in 
K-State's new food engineering lab 
as part of a research project. 

The thermal processing lab is a 
sm;ill -scale food- processing plant, 
said Brad Strahm, graduate student 

KSU CONFERENCE 



in agricultural engineering with an 
emphasis in food processing 

The Kansas Value Added Center 
provided funding for the lab, which 
is run primarily by the departments 
of agricultural engineering, foods 
and nutrition and horticulture. 

The lab provides support for 
Kansas companies involved in the 
food industry. 

■MMMMra 



It is a place for new product 
development and expansion," said 
Richard Hahn, director of the Value 
Added Center, 

The center was also responsible 
for getting the lab started 

"We worked with the deam an.i 
the researchers and got it going," 
Hahn said, 

"There have been other do- 

wmmmmmmmmmmam 



nations of equipment and donations 
from the deans of engineering and 
agriculture, but v,e arc the main 
monetary support." Hahn said. 

The lab makes possible drying 
food by hoi air. freezing, or 
ipraj ing, Strahm said. It can also be 
used to preserve food tn cans. 
blink's, jars and pouchcv 

The lab will be used for research 



and teaching, Strahm said. 

The asparagus project is one of 
the lab's first research projects and 
benefits a Kansas grower, he said. 

The grower throws away a lot of 
low trade asparagus that can't be 
sold as fresh, Strahm said. 

He said he hopes to dry this 
asparagus to use it as a powder or 
for dry asparagus soup mixes. 



'We at the lab will gather 
information the food processing 
industry can take and use on their 
own," Strahm said. 

The lab is located in Scaton 
I38A in the agricultural engineering 
department. 

Construction began the first part 
of January. Trie lab is now complete 
and operational. Strahm said. 



Cereal conference attracts 
buyers from Midwest 



ROYOm»CT 

Cotlegun 

Buyers came from all around to 
discuss cereal at the Manhattan 
Ramada Inn August 7-8. 

It wasn't breakfast cereal, 
however. 

The 1992 KSU Fall Cereal 
Conference — which focuses on 
wheat and barley — has been a 
tradition since the turn of the 20th 
century, said Kraig Roozeboom. 
coordinator of the Kansas Crop 
Performance Tests, and faculty 
member in the Department of 
Agronomy, 

"It started way back when 
people would take a train to 
Manhattan to see the variety of 
wheat there was to release," 
Roozeboom said. "Breeders would 
come from all over to buy." 

This year, buyers came from 
mostly Midwestern states, including 
Texas and the four states that 
border Kansas. They also came 
from organizations like Pioneer 
Seeds and Agri-Pro. 

Though it is called a cereal 
conference, Roozeboom said that it 
is actually a winter grain con- 
ference. 

Winter grains primarily consist 



of wheat and barley. Though barley 
had been discussed in past 
conferences, the focus this year was 
on the different varieties of wheat. 

"There are oodles of wheat 
varieties out there, and we tried to 
evaluate the yields and perfor- 
mances," Roozeboom said. "Part of 
the mandate of K-Stute is to 
develop varieties. However, it has 
been several years since a new' 
variety has been released." 

Possibly the most promising 
addition to the wheat harvesting 
industry is Karl, a new genetic 
variety of winter wheat developed 
at K State in 1990. 

Roozeboom said Karl, which 
was one of the varieties of wheat 
discussed at the conference, resists 
diseases such as leaf rust. 

Karl has increased more rapidly 
in popularity among Kansas wheat 
farmers than any other wheat 
variety 

When it first came out jn 1990. 
less than I percent of all wheat 
raised in Kansas was of the Karl 
variety. A survey done earlier this 
year indicated that more than 1 1 
percent of the 1992 Kansas wheat 
crop was Karl. The predominant 
areas include the south-central 



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Roozeboom said a lot of Kansas 
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PORTS 



AUGUST 27, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Head-to-head with the big boys 




Simoneau 
will lift the 
Wildcats 



•MAIM UYHKColegian 

Quentln Neuj«hr practices snapping the ball to a quarterback during a pre-practice drill Wednesday afternoon on 
the practice field. Neujert 1$ preparing for his third year with the Wildcats. 

Neujahr is getting his shot 



"I wanted to 
prove to 
everyone 
that I could 
play." 

QUENTIN NEUJAHR 



Collegian 

As a young boy in Ulysses, 
Nebraska. Quentin Neujahr 
wanted to be a Comhusker on 
the mighty Nebraska football 
team. 

Those boyhood dreams 
didn't come true, however. The 
Huskers didn't offer Neujaht a 
scholarship, even though he 
made the all-state team twice as 
a center at Centennial High. He 
thought about joining the Navy. 

But before he could sign the 
papers, K- State offered him a 
scholarship, and he has reaped 
the benefits since he started all 
22 games since in 1990. 

"I wanted to prove to 



everyone I could play," 
Neujahr said. "And I never 
thought I would be here talking 
to the media. 

"I have two strengths — 
numbers 65 and 75 (offensive 
guards Eric Wolford and Toby 
Lawrence, respectively). I 
wouldn't trade them for anyone 
in the Big Eight." 

The 6-foot-4, 270-pound 
junior has received first-team 
preseason all-Big Eight honors 
in several magazines. He 
headlines an offensive line that 
returns four starters and one 
part-time starter from a team 
that ate up a K- State record of 
4,23 1 yards of total offense last 
year. The Wildcats averaged 



384.64 yards a game, second in 
the conference. 

As quarterbacks Jason 
Smargiasso and Matt Garber 
battle for starting time, Neujahr 
said it doesn't matter who he is 
giving the ball to. 

"They're two great guys," 
Neujahr said. "They say 'Hut.' 
and I give them the ball." 

Neujahr makes the line calls 
to the team and also makes 
defensive reads, organizes the 
offensive line, controls the nose 
guard and reaches the line 
backer. 

Neujahr said he has personal 
goals this year of getting 

■ See NEUJAHR page 9 



CoifefiM 

K-State center Quentin Neujahr can 
describe nose tackle Jeff Simoneau in three 
words. 

"Simoneau is big," he says. 

Simoneau, a 6-foot 280-poundcr, is big. 
And powerful. In the weight room last 
week, the transferred senior set a K-Staie 
record with a squat of 79 1 pounds, roughly 
the equivalent of a good two-year-old 
steer. He has also bench pressed 503 
pounds, incline-bench pressed 476 pounds 
and power cleaned 403. 

He's fast, too. In the spring drills, he ran 
the 40 in 4.55 seconds, and he blazed the 
agility run in 4.02 seconds, missing the K- 
State mark at 3.77. 

His physical abilities, along with his 
three seasons at Arizona Stale, give him a 
chance to start on the defense, some say, if 
not a good amount of playing time on the 
field. 

Simoneau 's only setbacks, it seems, are 
that he's still learning the defensive plays, 
and he didn't play nose tackle for the Sun 
Devils. He played fullback. 

"I enjoy the contact, but nose tackles 
don't get that much glory as running 
backs," said Simoneau, who will probably 
share time with sophomore Darrell Harbert 
at nose tackle. No one at this time is ruling 
out that he could see some time at fullback 
for the Cats, however. 

"The offensive side is more complex, 
and this is something different." he said, 

At ASU. Simoneau gained more than 
500 yards and scored five touchdowns in 
14 career games for the Sun Devils. He 
was redshirted in his first season in 1988 
and became a starter for ASU the next two 
years. His top performance came in 1989 
against Washington as he rushed for 70 
yards on 21 carries. 

Simoneau cited the coaches and 
"getting tired" of ASU as the main reasons 
he left to play for the University of Utah. 

"I was engaged to a girl from Utah, and 
she wanted to return," Simoneau said. "We 
were going to live in Utah, and I would 
play for the Utes, But we broke up. and I 
decided to return (to Kansas)," 

When he did arrive at K State last 
season, however, he had to sit out due to 
NCAA transfer rules. During that time, be 
gained a few pounds, despite lifting 
weights and participating in practice. 

M At Arizona State. I weighed 240 to 250 
pounds," Simoneau said. "A year ago, the 
conditioning coach wanted to move me to 
nose guard. The running back coach said it 
was all right. Who would have thought that 
that I would be playing nose guard at K- 
State?" 

Simoneau played at Smith Center High 
School in Smith Center, Kan., where he 
rushed for 3,800 yards in his final two 
seasons and earned Parade High School 
All-American honors. 



COLUMN 



■ See SIMONEAU page 8 



Summer 
sports 
good, bad 
and ugly 

The summer sports scene had its moments. It 
had its dead spots, too. With two weeks of 
Olympic coverage thrown in the mix, the sports 
gurus of America got a taste of nearly every sport 
known to mankind. 

Without question, this summer the greatest 
team ever was assembled. You know them, 1 1 
pros and one college kid who didn't belong. The 
Dream Team was perfection personified. 

Did anyone honestly believe the Dream Team 
could be touched? They played at half speed 
most of the time and still cruised. 

More perfection — the Chicago Bulls. 
Granted, the Bulls struggled, but they still won 
the NBA title. When a team survives the 
nightmares that Michael Jordan and company did 
and finds a way to win. it's a sign of greatness 
Give Chicago the one 
player they need 
(whomever he may be) in 
the off-season, and it's 
three-peat in 1993. 

Nothing tickled my 
fancy more this summer 
than the world's greatest 
track star, Carl Lewis. His 
long jump performance in 
the '92 Games was 
impressive, but it didn't 
compare to his anchor leg 
of trie 4x100 meter relay. 
He smoked. 

Lewis reportedly ran 
an 8.8 second split. 
Because of a running 
start, though, that time isn't record-book 
material. Nonetheless, it was the highlight of my 
summer. 

Now let's move on to the average. Watching 
your favorite baseball team should elicit some 
emotion. The only emotions the Kansas City 
Royals brought me were laughter and tears. 
Unfortunately, both at the same time. 

Kansas City is undoubtedly the most 
inconsistent team in the American League. The 
Royals, however, consistently lose the close 
games. Injuries, errors, suspect pitching and lack 
of a good clean-up hitter have turned the team 
into a ho-hummer. I can tell you Royals fans 
miss 1985. 1 do. 

The Reebok controversy was a bunch of hot 
air. Purely political and ridiculous. C'mon, guys, 
it was just a sweatsuit, it's not as if Jordan, John 
Stockton and Barkley were going to abandon 
Nike to become Reebok spokesmen. Give me a 
break. 

And last but not least, I must fit in Andre 
Agassi. The flashy, long-haired whipper-snapper 
from Vegas won the bank at Wimbledon. But 
was his jubilation sincere? After Agassi's 
victory, he fell to the ground like the great Bjom 
Borg. Some say it was staged, sort of like a 
professional wrestling match. A remote camera 
showed Agassi's coach gesturing Agassi to hit 
the deck and stay down. The fan at home never 
saw that shot. A cheap shot. But it makes you 
wonder if Agassi hammed it up. 

It was a summer of notable happenings in the 
world of sports — not all good, not all bad. But 
that's sports for you. It can make you ecstatic or 
sick to your stomach. 




MATT 

WALTERS 



SPORTS DIGEST 



► ROYALS LOSE THEIR 
FOURTH IH A ROW 

ARLINGTON. Texas <AP) — Rookie 
Roger Paviik stopped Kansas City for 
seven 1 -3 innings before getting relief 
help from Jeff Russell, and the Texas 
Rangers beat the Royals 3-1 Wednesday 
night. 

The Rangers won their 
third straight game. The 
Royals have lost four in a 
row. 

Paviik (2-1) won his 
second straight start. He 
gave up one run on six 
hits, struck out tour and 
walked two. 

Russell relieved with one out in the 
eighth inning and runners on first and 
third. He struck out Mike Macfarlane, 
retired Wally Joyner on a popup and 
worked the ninth for his 28th save. 

JuanSamuel hit a lead-off tnpie in the 
fifth and stole home as Jeff Conine 
squared to bunt. Conine missed the bunt 
try. but Samuel scored when the ball got 
away from catcher Ivan Rodriguez. 



ttt? 



►TEXAS A&M SPOILS 
WALSH'S RETURN 

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Bill Walsh 
went back to school Wednesday night 
and flunked his first test 

Walsh, coaching his first college 
game in 14 years, saw his No. 17 
Stanford squad blow a lead in the fourth 
quarter and lose to No. 7 threw a 21- 
yard touchdown pass to Greg Schorp 
with 12:10 to play. Then Terry 
Venetoulias kicked a 39-yard field goal 
with 4:27 remaining to lift Texas A&M in 
the season opener. 

►THE SEASON'S OVER 
FOR MARK GUBICZA 

KANSAS CITY (AP) — Kansas City 
right-hander Mark Gubicza is likely 
finished for the season because of a sore 
shoulder. 

Dr Lewis Yocum examined Gubicza 
Monday in Los Angeles and said the 
soreness was probably caused by 
weakness in the rotator cuff. He had 
surgery on his rotator cuff in 1 990. 



INTRAMURAL* 



Intramural deadlines nearing 



KM»TfgH YOUHO 

Cottefan 

The deadline for nine of this fall's 
intramural competitions is Friday. 

Entries can be turned in by groups for 
$10 in the team divisions and $1 for 
individuals (not including tax) in the 
singles divisions. Teams can also save 
SI 00 by paying the $125 yearly fee. 
which allows them to participate in 
every team sport. 

Sign-up and entry -fee payment is at 
the Chester E. Peters Recreation 
Complex. 

Steve Martini, associate director of 
intramurals, said there are very few 
exceptions for those missing the 
deadline. 

"We will take anyone who signs up 
prior to the deadline, but we can't take 
them beyond it unless there aren't 
enough entries in the sport," Martini 

said. 

One sport that always has plenty of 
entries is flag football. Last fall, 40 more 
teams competed than in the 1990 season 
to raise the number to 186 teams, and it 
looks to be just as popular this season. 

In the four intramural divisions — 
fraternity division, residence hall men. 



independent men and women's division 
— 2,700 students participated in flag 
football. There are also co-rec teams, 
which are co-ed, but their winnings do 
not count for points toward team totals. 

Of the 2,700 in flag football, more 
than 2,000 were men. The comparison is 
much the same when it comes to 
basketball — 2,200 men competed last 
year to only 450 women. 

Martini said he can't tell whether 
intramural participation is increasing, 
but he said physical exercise is 
becoming more popular. 

During the 1991-92 academic year, 
the Rec Complex had about 460,000 
users, which is 25,000 more users than 
in the previous year. Of those users, 
many chose to compete in intramurals. 

Martini said there is an intramural 
sport for nearly everyone, including 
everything from volleyball to miniature 
golf or inner-tube water polo. 

"I think there is enough to do whether 
it's a team sport or an individual," 
Martini said. "We have something if 
they warn to run, lift weights, swim. If 
they like to compete, there's an area to 
do it in." 



INTRAMURAL 
SCHEDULE 



Sept. 2 
Septa 

3-Well FUcquetball Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 
Sept 3 
Sept. 3 

1 on 1 fftaskottmlt Sept. 3 
Soccer Sept, 8 

Entries wt be U**n until Friday Aug. 28 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



U 



ENTERTAINMENT 



AugwtaT, 1998 J 









REVIEW DIGEST 



by Jim Johnson 



► VARIOUS ARTISTS — "Singles" soundtrack (Epic) 



If you listen to Top 40 radio or aren't just 
out of touch with reality, you probably have 
beard of Pearl Jam. 

If nothing else, the 1 8,000 plus fans at the 
University of Kansas' Day on the Hill have. 

Or if your tastes run to something a bit 
more towards the mind-numbing, how about 
Alice in Chains? 

These groups, as well as other big Seattle 
bands — Mudhoney, the now-defunct 
Mother Love Bone, and Soundgarden — 



have been assembled on the incredible 
soundtrack to the movie "Singles," 

You may think this is a CD-hyping of the 
much ballyhooed Seattle scene, but most of 
these songs were recorded and never released 
prior to the publicity. This album it well 
worth the $14.99 you have to plop down on 
the counter. The standouts are Pearl Jam's 
amazingly smooth and bubbly "Breath," 
Mother Love Bone's "Chloe Dancer/Crown 
of Thorns" and Alice in Chains' vision of 



►HELMET — "Meantime" (Interscope) 



What do you call a band that doesn't fit 
nice and neatly into any category? 

Alternative is what most people would 
say, but Helmet is far too heavy for that 
label. The production on the album 
"Meantime" isn't quite up to par for most 
die-hard headbangers. who would probably 



consider the content on this album wimpy. 

It doesn't matter what bin you find it in at 
the record store, because Helmet does 
manage to put it together and deliver tome 
power-packed riffs that will leave your ears 
bleeding, and you begging for more. By the 
end of the album, the sound may get a bit 



metal. "Would?" 

This album has surprising depth, most 
notably found with the inclusion of some of 
Seattle's grandmasters: Jimi Hendrix. and 
Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart. You also 
can find some great tunes by Paul 
Westerberg, formerly with the Replacements, 
and a long, but really cool, guitar workout by 
the Smashing Pumpkins. 

This one is definitely worth leaving in the 
CD player. 



monotonous, but it's still a good buy. Some 
of the notable tricks include "In the 
Meantime" and the punk-metal "Unsung." 

I guess you could just call this band 
alternative metal with a punk edge, sort of 
like the Sex Pistols meet Iron Maiden meets 
Jane's Addiction. 





|HSA 

The Lemonheads (Atlantic) 
| ne» And The Pal Of The 

M a p aq u i u ar — Flop (Frontier) 
| In The M eantime — Helmet 

(Interscope) 
! Between 10th end 1 1th — The Charlatans U.K 

(RCA) 



-Afghan Whigs (Sub Pop) 
I— Faith No More (Reprise) 
i — Drop Nineteens (Caroline) 
i — Juliana Hatfield (Mamoth) 
I -.*». — The Boo Radleys (Colombia) 
I Kitty — The Dashboard Saviours (Twin Tone) 




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(35 mm, 110. 126, C-41) 
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K- State Union Art Gallery 

Aug. 24 - Sept. 14, 1992 

Gallery Hours 8 a.m, -5 p.m 

Week Days 

Sponosored by the "-» ■*-»-•. 

Department Of Art I ijuwoee from Weattoop 7764030. 



C-1-6 



■9 * 



Royal Purple 1 AAQ 


Acacia- Sept. 8 


Phi Kappa Theta-Sept. 28 


Alpha Chi Omega-Sept. 8-9 


Pi Beta Phi-Sept. 29-30 


Alpha Delta Pi-Sept. 9-10 


Pi Kappa Alpha-Sept. 30 


Alpha Gamma Rho-Sept. 10-11 


Pi Kappa Phi-Sept 30 


Alpha Kappa Alpha-Sept. 1 1 


Pi Kappa Theta-Sept. 30-Oct 1 


Alpha Kappa Lambda-Sept. 1 1 


Sigma Alpha E^ibn-Oci. 1 


Alpha Phi Alpha-Sept. 1 1 


Sigma Chi-OcL 1 


Alpha Tau Omega- Sept. 14 


Sigma Gamma Rho-OcL 1-2 


Alpha Xi Delta-Sept. 14-15 


Sigma Kappa-Oct 5-6 


Beta Sigma Pst-Sept. 15 


Sigma Nu-Oct. 6 


Beta Thcta Pi-Sept 15-16 


Sigma Phi Epsilon-Oct, 6 


Chi Omega-Sept. 16-17 


Sigma Sigma Sigma-Oct. 7-8 


Delta Delta Delta-Sept. 17-18 


Tau Kappa Epsuon-Oct 8 


Delta Sigma Phi-Sept. 18 


TheaXi-Oct.8 


Delta Sigma Theta-Sept. 1 8 


Triangle-Oct. 9 


Delta Tau Delta-Sept. 21 


Zeta Phi Beta-Oct. 9 


Delta Upsilon-Sept. 21 


Boyd-Oct. 9 


FarmHouse-Sept. 21 


Clovia-OcL 12 


Gamma Phi Beta-Sept. 21-22 


EeWdt-Oa.12 


Kappa Alpha Psi-Sept. 22 


Ford-Oa.12 


Kappa Alpha Theta-Sept. 22-23 


Goodnow-OcL 13 


Kappa Delta-Sept. 23-24 


Haymaker-Oct. 13 


Kappa Kappa Gamma-Sept. 24-25 


Marian-Oct.13 


Kappa Sigma- Sept. 25 


Moore-Oct. 14 


Lambda Chi Alpha-Sept. 25 


Putnam-Oct. 14 


Omega Psi Phi-Sept. 28 


Smith-Oct, 15 


Phi Beta Sigma- Sept. 28 


Smunhwaite-Oct. 15 


Phi Delta Theta-Sept. 28 


VanZue-Oct-15 


Phi Gamma Delta-Sept. 29 


West-Oct.15 


Phi Kappa Tau-Scpt. 29 


OfFCampu^Oct. 16-30 


Picture yourself in the 1993 


Royal Purple yearbook. 


Photos will be taken from 8:30 


If you arc a greek member, but 


a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. 


live in a residence hall or off 


in the K-Statc Union Room 209. 


campus, please have your photo 




taken with your fraternity or so- 




rority. 





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Q August 27, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



V, 



CAMPUS DINING 



Vet Med Complex gets 
Union cafeteria branch 



Simoneau adjusts to transition to nose tackle 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

"I wanted to come and play at K 
State, but they weren't so good then 
(in the 1987 season)," he said, 'i 
wasn't as highly recruited as people 
thought. 1 had 10 to 12 schools that 



wanted me. I went to Arizona State 
for their tradition. I'm glad I came 
back." 

Transition to the defensive side 
has meant that Simoneau had to 
adjust to stopping the offense and 



not being a key player. 

"I've learned to take on the 
double-team and to stay low to the 
ground," Simoneau said. "I can stay 
low, since I don't have as much 
size." 



Food Services 
opens dining area 
in Trotter Hall 

BY THE COLLEGIAN STAFF 



There is a new cafeteria on 
(.ampuv 

K State Union Food Service has 
opened ;> branch cafeteria in Trotter 
Halt in the Veterinary Medicine 
Complex. 

The cafeteria was opened so 
faculty and students can have a 
convenient eating facility, said 
Mallcy Sisson, Union Food Service 
assistant director. 

The cafeteria is open from 11:15 
a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. It serves a hot entree, soups, 
deli plates, two side dishes. 
.lessens, salads and beverages — a 
menu similar to the one used in the 
Union stateroom. 

Anyone may eat in the cafeteria, 
Sisson said, and it is more 
convenient for people in the 
Veterinary Medicine Complex to 
eat there rather than in the Union. 

The cafeteria cost $1,500, Sisson 
said Although some existing 
equipment was used, new dishes 



and silverware had to be purchased. 
The food is delivered from the 
Union daily and paper products 
aren't used. 

Jean Sonnenfield, first-year 
student in veterinary medicine, said 
the cafeteria is a good idea. 

The faculty and students get a 
food menu for the week, and 
Sonnenfield said she likes it 
because it is a balanced meal. 

She said the cafeteria will be 



more popular in the winter than the 
warmer months because when the 
weather is nice, people bring their 
lunches and eat outside. 

"The only problem with the 
cafeteria is the size. It's too small," 
Sonnenfield said. 

In a survey last spring, the 
results showed that 600 people 
would need to be accommodated. 
The cafeteria only seats 1 12 people 
at present. 



Stop by K-State Union Room 206 for a 
Demonstration of the latest Microsoft Software 



&f 



LV 



/i^ 



\° 



7^ 



{' 



IMI "o»Q «n f* iLt •"•■ *■•*'. Hi ' A ,fl^J if > 



'.(f 25* DRAWS 

1115Moro 7763770 



August 27 

11:00 a.m. ■ 
2:00 p.m. 
August 28 
11:00 a.m. - 
2:00 p.m. • 



Microsoft Works 3.0 fortheMacintosh 
Microsoft Word for Windows 2.0 



Microsoft Word for Windows 2.0 
Microsoft Works 3.0 for the Macintosh 

Or, see them at Campus Fest 

on the lawn between the K-State Union and Seaton Hall 

Iff] K-State Union 

LaL Book* tof« S32-&SW 



*** fxrtam you n*W- Vbur dotal wtmui to Mp em 

k aa» Own vcmn ttufert twviOM, prolan* md unk 



Welcome Back Students! 

10% Off 

All Parts and Accessories 
with Student LD. 

•Everything for the Harley Enthusiast 



526 
Pillsbury Dr. 




Open 
Mon.-SaL 

10-6 



LOS COMPADRES 

Authentic 

South of the 
Border Food 



<4 



H 



•Carry out Available 

Mon.-Thurs. 11-2/4:30-9 

Frl.-Sat. 11-2/4:30-10 

Closed Sundays 308 Vattier 

LOS COMPADRES 

$2 Off Any Dinner Item 

Expires Sept. 1 5 



wVV*Vi^^*i^^^*VVV^VVVV*VVi*V4HHH*Vi*i*V-i-4*V*VV^ij 




NESPOR 

Wines & Spirits 



"Pine *WiH€& fat, ef<%u% Pteateeie 

• Specializing in domestic and imported wines 

• Large selection of cordials and liquors 

• Special orders welcomed for parties and weddings 

• Case discounts 

1338 Westloop Place 

Westloop Shopping Center 

539-9441 II 



MMMM IS ONLY 
MINUTES AWAY! 




DINE-IN/CARRYOUT 

Check your local yrllow pages for the 
Pizza Hut* restaurant nearest you. 




ANY LARGE SPECIALTY PIZZA ON LY...*1 0.45 

OR 
ANY MEDIUM SPECIALTY PIZZA ONLY...*8.95 

OR 
ANY SMALL SPECIALTY PIZZAONLY...*6.25 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

_ FOR DELIVERY CALL 539-7666 

I OR THE LOCATION NEAREST YOU 

EXPIRES 9-15-92 



Offer Good On: 
Supreme, Meailovers* 
Taco, Bar-B-Q, 
Pepperoni Lovers* 



* AGGIEVILLE 539-7666 
1121 Moro 

a Westloop 539-7447 
2931 Ctaflin 

• 3rd & Moro 776-4334 
231 Moro 



Ptea 
*Hut, 



I EXPIRES 9- 15-92 




Front Lawn of The K-State Union 

(Between The K-State Union And Seaton Hall) 



Free Food & Beverages! 

Product Demonstrations! 

Games & Prizes I 

Free Samples! 

Entertainment! 



Participants: 

Hershey Chocolate Mennen 
Home Box Office Newsweek 
Microsoft American Express 
MCI and many morel 

! 1 



Don't Miss Out on the Fun and Prizes! 

jg4l^j f^M^*| f^f^j 

si 



K -State Union 



We appreciate your support You dollars continue to to hato tfw K-State 
Union sponsor student serwees, programs and actMt te l . 






August 27 - 28 10 am - -4 prn 



August 27, 1902 Q 






< 



Finney says women must 
seize every opportunity 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

women's movement. He compared 
Finney's achievements with those 
of Amelia Earhart and Nancy 
Kassebaum. 

Finney praised the efforts of 
women in Kansas and the nation 
and said she was. "deeply proud of 
all women." 

"America's heritage is richer for 
the participation of Kansas 
women," she said. 

Finney said there are still many 
invisible barriers facing women 
today, and they will not be 
overcome until many attitudes are 
changed. 

"But we must persevere," she 
said. 

Finney encouraged women to be 
prepared with the credentials and 
courage to seize every opportunity. 

"Women make up 72 percent of 
all public school teachers but hold 
only 4.8 percent of the nation's 
superintendent positions — the 
highest policymaking positions in 
education," Finney said. 

With 50 percent of school 
administrators projected to retire 
within the next ten years, Finney 
said she thinks there has never been 
a better opportunity for women's 
advancement. 

She said women must continue 
to build on the examples set forth 
by the women of the late 20th 
century, like those who served in 
Operation Desert Storm, which led 
women to even higher grounds in 
the struggle for equality. 



I«V 




Aljr\J 5-10 p m. Mon.-Sat. 

Urtil 5-9 p.m. Sunday 

For 

Authentic 

Italian Recipes 

Cooked 

To Order 

This Week's Specials 

• Steak & Pasta $5-95 

• Chicken Parmigiana $5-45 

• Sherry Chicken Alfredo $5.95 
(with fettucine Pasta) $5.95 

All You Can Eat 

Spaghetti & Meatballs $3,95 

All Dinners Served With 
Tossed Salad & Breadsticks 




537-8443 2304 Stagg Hill Rd. 
Next to Clyde's In Manhattan 




Don't miss Clyde's Sunday 

BREAKFAST BUFFET 

for a satisfying taste 
treat that won't bust your 

wallets: 

• Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits 

• Creamed Chipped Beef 

• Btsquit Gravy 

• Homefried Potatoes 

• French Toast 
•Pancakes 
•Bacon/Sausage 

• Scrambled Eggs 

• EscaOoped Apples 

• Grilled Ham Steak 

All You Can Eat 
For Only '4.95 

Buffet: 9:30 am till 1.00 p.m. 

Or order one of our famous gourmet 

omelets or skillet breakfasts 

537-8440 

2304 Stags Hill Rd. 




located across from ttw 
Hottday Inn-HoHdom* 



Finney said the future is 
positive. 

"Above all. let me encourage 
each of you to seize the 
opportunities presented each day in 
your life," Finney said. "Life is not 
a dress rehearsal. It is right now — 
everything counts. 

"Nothing worthwhile comes 
easily," she said. 

In her talk about a recent trip to 
Russia, she said women there are 
highly educated, but they lack 
confidence. 

Although she said she thinks it 
wilt improve with time, she is 
concerned about democracy 
surviving in Russia's poverty. 

At the end of the presentation, 
Boyd presented Finney with a 
plaque in appreciation for her time 
and her remarks. 



Neujahr making the best 
of coming to K-State 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

another 1,000-yard rusher and 
cutting the number of sacks to half 
of last year's total. But the big 
personal goal for Neujahr is to play 
Nebraska, the school that turned 
him away. 

"They wanted me to come as a 
walk-on," Neujahr said, "I couldn't 
do that. So 1 came here, and I'm 
looking forward to meeting them in 
Japan ." 

Wearing the Wildcat purple, 
Neujahr said he's glad to be at K- 
State. 

"I came here with high hopes 
and aspirations," he said. "We 
knew we could win with Coach 
Snyder when we beat North Texas 
State. We knew things were 
changing after the win." 



Pig's 


^T 


Eye 




Beer 




$1 


«*^ 



BLEACHERS 



K-R0CK 

LIVE 
REMOTE 



1st Anniversary 

Party On! 

Friday 28 

16 o*. Beer in Souvenir Cup $1 

16 u/ . Wells in Souvenir Cup t 1 

Macho Nachos, Santa Fe Chicken or Smothered Burrito 

^* Prizes Galore!!! **fiY 

Video Mar hi no. CD Player, Pool Cue, Coolers, Neon Sit", Mirror*. 

AM/FM Sony Walkman, Nylon Jarkt-t, Darts, Sweatshirts, 75 T- 

Shirts, CDs. Pi nas. Movie Passes, Movie Rentals, I Lit - , I Limit- . 

Tans. Yogurt, Bate-ball Cards. 

List Continuing to grow! 

523 S. 17th 537-1484 

10 blocks south of K-Stale Lnion 



McCain Auditorium- KSl 

LASER ZEPPELIN 



LASER LIGHT ROCK CONCERT 

• 10,000 WATT DOLBY t Sound • FULL COLOR 3D LASER BEAMS 




FEATURING THE MUSIC OF 

LED ZEPPELIN 



THIS THURSDAY 8:00 PM 

TIX: $10 Advance $12 Day Of 

at Box Office & All Outlets 

Bra Wiaftap iMgamaal, UA. • HI EUan Alia Hiftiw • ILjgdleU. CI CUT* • PS™ (TOUM-MM 



Neujahr, junior in pre-pharmacy. 
is committed to his school work as 
he earned his second Phillips 66 
Academic All-Big Eight selection 
last season. For his hard work, the 
coaching staff has named him co- 
captain. 

But he shies from the spotlight. 

"It's nice to get the publicity." 
Neujahr said, "but it might not get 
me into the NFL. There are only 28 
teams that need a center. So, my 
chances are slim. That's why I 
study hard in school." 




Iraq no-fly zone underway 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

fixed-wing aircraft from the south, 
although it still had tome 
helicopters based there. 

In London, the British 
government said today it would 
send six warplanes Thursday to a 
base at D hah ran, Saudi Arabia, to 
help enforce the "no-fly" zone. 
Three are Tornado GR-I fighter- 
bombers capable of fighting other 
aircraft and attacking ground targets 
and three are Tornado GR-IA all- 
weather reconnaissance planes. 

Transport aircraft carrying 
logistic support left for the region 
early today, the Defense Ministry 
said. 



The United States has based 
fighters, attack planes and other 
aircraft in Saudi Arabia since the 
Gulf War, and the aircraft carrier 
USS Independence is in the Persian 
Gulf. 

Syria, Egypt and Saudi Arabia 
have voiced opposition to moves 
that would precipitate Iraq's break- 
up, fearing that would heat up 
regional tensions as efforts are 
made to end Arab-Israeli conflicts. 

However, they appeared to have 
been persuaded that a "no-fly zone" 
would weaken and possibly 
eliminate Hussein, considered a 
long-term threat to the region's 
stability. 




50* Tacoa 

and 

$1.25 Margaritas 
Tacoa 5-9 p.m. 

105 N. 3rd 
776-9879 



PAT M. DREILING D.D.S. M.S., P. A. 

Practice limited to Orthodontics 

TRANSFERS WELCOME 

537-0136 



Manhattan Med. Center 

1 133 College Ave. Building D 



members American 
Association of Orthodontics 



ACCEPT 
MEDICARE 
ASSIGNMENT 





L - J 



DERMATOLOGY 

Robert H. Cathey, M.D.P.A. 
Diplomat* Am Board Dermatology 

MMM Of SKIN • HAM • MM 
•SKIN CAMCKR • COUAOCM IMJCCTIOMS 
•SMDSH VHN TfUtATMMT 

(Marfiaoan .n Except On Days Beiow) 
Juncion Cty 1 si & 3rd Wed of each monln 
ADierie..2nd wed. of each monti 
For any appointment call 

537-4990 

1133 College Av 



UPPER LEVEL 

BLDGB 



ISLAM AT A GLANCE 

The Arabic word Islam means peace, submission and obedience. The religion of Islam is the complete acceptance of the 
teachings and guidance of Allah (Arabic word for Cod, lor which there is no plural or feminine gender) as revealed to 
His Prophet Muhammad, Peace Be Upon Him (PBUH) 

A Muslim is one who believes in Allah and strives for total reorganization of his/her life according to His revealed 
guidance and the sayings of the Prophet The Muslim also works tor building human society on the same basis 
"Muhammadanism" is a misnomer for Islam and offends its very spirit 

Islam is not a new religion It is, in essence, the same message and guidance which Allah revealed to all Prophets: "Say. 
we believe in Allah and that which has been revealed to us, and that which was revealed to Abraham and Ismael and 
Isaac and Jacob and the tribes and that which was given to Moses and Jesus and to the other Prophets, from their Lord 
We make no distinction between any of them, and to Him (Allah) we submit " (Qura'n 3:83) The message which was 
revealed to Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) is Islam in its comprehensive, complete and final form. 
There are five pillars of Islam 

1 The declaration of faith: To bear witness that there is none worthy of worship except Allah, and that Muhammad is 
His messenger to all human beings till the Day of Judgment The Prophethood of Muhammad obliges the Muslims to 
follow his exemplary life as a model 

2 Prayers Daily prayers are offered five times a day as a duty towards Allah. They strengthen and enliven the belief in 
Allah and inspire man to a higher morality. They purify the heart and prevent temptation towards wrong -doings and 
evils 

3 Fasting the month of Ramadan: The Muslims during the month of Ramadan not only abstain from food, drink, and 
sexual intercourse from dawn to sunset, but also from evil intentions and desires. It teaches love, sincerity, and taction. 
It develops a sound social conscience, patience, unselfishness and will-power 

4 Zakat: To pay annually 25% of one's net saving on which a year has passed as a religious duty and purifying sum to 
be spent on poorer sections of the community. 

5. Pilgrimage to Makkah It is to be performed once a lifetime, if one can afford it financially and physically 
Besides these pillars every action performed with the awareness that it fulfills the will of Allah is considered an act of 
worship Islam enjoins faith in the oneness and sovereignty of Allah which makes man aware of the meaning! ulness of 
the Universe and of his place in it This belief frees him from all fears and superstitions by making him conscious of the 
presence of the almighty Allah and of man's obligations towards Him. 

This faith must be expressed and tested in action Faith alone is not enough. Belief in one God requires that we look 
upon all humanity as one family under the universal omnipotence of God - the Creator and Nourisher of all. Islam 
refects the idea of a chosen people, making faith in Allah and good action the only way to heaven. Thus, a direct 
relationship is established with Allah (God), without any intercessor 

Muslim Community Association. 



STUDENT 

LOANS 




24 HR. PROCESSING MAKES IT SIMPLE! 

Let the professional in-house staff at Kansas State Bank assist 
you with your student loan and all your banking needs. 

Student Loans • Checking Accounts • 24 Hr. ATM Banking 

Lender code #821176 

Kansas State Bank 

Westloop • Downtown • Aggieville • K-State Union, 537-4400 




1 August 27 ' 1992 



K 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Essentials 



DOUBLE BARRELED 



DARYLBLASI 







CALVIN AND HOBBES 






JcT 



i wish m l JP7^% 

SHIRT HAD 

A LOGO OR 

PBSQuCT ON If W jff 




ft aoOD SHIRT 
TURNS TV€ 
nt*Kfc« WTO 

a wkuoue y ^f 

BILLBOARD 




THE LOVE ARK 



IT SWS TO TME WORU), 
"KW IDENTin IS SO WRAPPED 
UP IK WHAT I 8W THAT 
I PfclO THE OMtgUtr TO 
AWERT\SE ITS PRODUCTS.'* 



BILLWOTBISON 




JIM'S JOURNAL 
•_ 

z d;«w+ Jo 



JIMDIKKERS 




JL 




_£*»"» 



t^D 





THE STRIP 



DAVID SWEARINGEN 






( no re FULLY I 1 




ONE DAYTO LIVE 

A Russian Map opera about a Moscow Mftflly 




DAY 2 — (Delilah meets Sputnik's 
father) 

After a long, hard day of harvesting on 
the mayonnaise farm, Sputnik's father, 
Neapolitan, decides to leave Kiev and 
drive into the big city to see his only son's 
brother. When he arrives at Sputnik's 
bachelor pad at 4 a.m., he notices not 
ONE, but TWO people hiding under the 
blankets. Neopolitan is not one bit amused 
when he notices right away that Delilah 
sleeps with her socks off! ! ! 

"We never, EVER sleep with our socks 
off in Kiev!" shouts Neopolitan. "You can 



easily pass athlete's foot onto someone 
else." 

"Excuse me, old dude ... but I'm not 
wearing socks!" squirts a timid, but 
forceful voice from under the sheets. "I 
just had surgery yesterday to have my 
varicose veins stripped. Now go away so 
that we can continue to play pediatrician." 

How does Sputnik explain Delilah to his 
father? Will Delilah be able to wear socks 
in the future?? Will Neopolitan demand 
that his son go back with him to Kiev??? 
Grab tomorrow's Collegian for these and 
other updates. 



CROSSWORD 



EUGENE SHEFFER 



ACROSS 

1 Waste no 

time 
4 Pull an 

all-nighter 
8 Track 

•vent 

12 A billion 
years 

13 Headlight'' 

14 -Holy 
cow!* 
old-style 

15 Political 
indepen- 
dents 

17 Stride 
easily 

18 Barbecued 
M 

19 Money- 
comb 
compart- 
ment, e.g. 

21 Served a 
la crternes 
jubilee 

24 1 9 Across' 
sides 

25 Gun the 
engine 

26 Deviate 
26 Number 

for Snow 

While 
32 Washing - 

tons 
34 Agent 
36 Bruce's 



missus 
37 Macabre 

illustrator 
Edward 
39 Marceau 
portrayal 
410 

42 Deleted 
44 Pamper 
46 In 1946, 

50 Pre- 
varicate 

51 Light bulb'' 

52 Home 
heater; 
car cooler 

56 Mortgage 

57 Lett's 
lather 

58 Love seat 
capacity 

59 Fast time? 

60 Say it isn't 



so 

61 Pub order 
DOWN 

1 Fashon 
line 

2 Debtor's 
letters 

3 Albrecht 
Durer, e.g. 

4 Pleasingly 
plumb 

5 Aries 

6 Xanadu's 
rrver 

7 Malone of 
the NBA 

8 At ease 

9 Enthusias- 
tic 

10 Mafia 
bigwig 

11 Paradise 
16 Film 

director 



Solution lime: 


23 mine 




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Wanders 

20 Greek con 
sonants 

21 Kermit. 
for one 

22 Carson's 
successor 

23 Music ap- 
preciation 

27 Charlotte's 
creation 

29 Family 
feud 

30 Concert 
pianist 
Gilets 

31 Cleo's 
river 

33 Navi- 
gator's 
instrument 

35 Snapshot 

38 It sounds 
like you 

40 Insured's 
paper 

43 Had the 

chutzpah 8-27 

45 24 horas 

46 Tablet X P A C K X 

47 Garfield's 
pal 



C*l t lHlftCft*T F or answers to today'* crossword, call 
vlUlfirCUi 1-900-4544473 1 99« per rrunuie.iDuch 
lone / rotary phones (IB* only ) A K»g Features sorvwo, NYC 



Yesterday's answer 6-27 



48 Spotted 

49 Hard to 
find 

53 Commo- 
tion 

54 Hooter 

55 Caviar 



CRYPTOQU1P 

I K N A M - 

IQKFCK HFNAE EWE 
AXF QHQNUUZ KCUWHD 



WOMEN SLIMO WRESTERS 



D W H P X K M . 

Yesterday's Cryptoquip: AFTER I ATE THAT GI- 
GANTIC SALAD, I FOUND I TOSSED AND TURNED 
ALL NIGHT. 

Today's Cryptoquip clue: I equals F 



L 




LASSIFIEDS 



GET THE WORD OUT 

PUCE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN KEDZS 103 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



1 DAY 20 words or less — $5 

each word over 20 — $.20 per word 

2 DAYS 20 words or less — $6 25 

each word over 20 — $.25 per word 

3 DAYS 20 words ° f 'ess — $7.25 

each word over 20 — $.30 per word 

4 DAYS 20 words or less — $8 

each word over 20 — $.35 per word 

5 DAYS 20 words 0f less — W50 

each word over 20 — $.40 per word 
(consecutive day rate) 



HOW TO PAY 

AJlclaselrMtnkMJbtpMdlriafrvK* 
ureses you hew in ettabttshed account 
with Student Pubtratiofl*. 

Cnh, chick, UnkrCvd or vnt ere 
•oMpMd. There Is a |T stryics chtrg* 
on a* returned chocks. 

W> rttorw Kw right lo «dft, <e|Kt «t 
prceerty dasahy any *d 

HEADLINES 

For tn *nn duros, w*n put e 

•bovoyouftdtoeotehthe 
'si 



CANCCUATIOItS 

•dtmuubtptooMby H you aaa your tkwbetom your ee* 

nooethedoyhOtortthtdMoyouaent has tiptoed, ■» *tf refund you lor the 

youradtormCietalMfeeisyidt ronattng deyt, 
nu*ttMpleo*4 by 4 pjTLhfo working too mutt crt us before noon ineoey 

oays prior to tf* date you want your ed the ed It to to) ouMshsd. 

*"*■ CORRECTIONS 

FREE FOUND ADS ft ywfM worm to your s&eioese 

As te*vk» to you,** run founded) col ut. W* accept rteponsssfry enty 

for throe oeyi tree e/ charge, tor IN ftrtt wrong Intortlon. 



Call S32-6555 to place your classified. 




OR WRITI 
532-9558 ooubomm 

MX 
532-7309 



KeeUefMIOS 



OFFICE HOURS 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 
8 i.m.-S p.m. 

(Eicopt hoMdayo) 



Otftj 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 




ADVANCED FLIGHT 
Training. Mufti enflino, 



irvstrument. oommercial, 
ATP. CFt ratings. 
Privato and instrument 
ground school. 

Hugh trvin at 539-3128 
evenings, 

ATTENTION LADIES I Take 
time to schedule a 
tree Mary Kay facial! 
Mary Kay is a top- 
line skin core program 
tnvite soma friends 
rt's double the funt I Call 
Karl* Matson at 
539-43*2 

COME FLY with us, K State 
Flying Club has 
five airplanes. For best 
prices call Sam 
Knipp, 539-6193 after 
5:30p.m. 

NEED MORE student in Ling 
594 Comanche 

texts, tp. 65. class 

directory). For infor- 
mation: Jim Armagosi, 



532-6873. 
ura 1106. 



Leas- 



SHYNESS WORKSHOP. It 

shyness inhibiting 
you? Five- session 
workshop will teach 
skills of overcoming 
shyness. Mondays 
330 5p.m. beginning 
September 14. Fee: 
$10 Call University 
Counseling Services at 
532-6927 to reserve a 
place. 

SMART ONE day dietl Rid 
15 to 20 pounds 
in 30 quick days. Enjoy 
summerl 'Free 

Samples* (8001396-3978 




Found ada cam b» placed 
free for thro* 
days. 

FOUND FERRET. Call 537 
6125, Mika, Scot! 
orJoff. 




Ma raquira a form of 
picture IO IKSU or 

driver's licona* or othar) 

whan placing a 
parsorval. 

BOB FINALLY made it to 
211 Lots dance, 
party and have some 
fun. Happy Birth- 
day Butthoadt Love, RT. 



SBM 28. 6' 178 pounds, 
would like to meet a 
nice lady, 23 to 37 for 
romance and to 
gethemaas. Reply 
Collegian Bom 1 



osor 



Ever wsirttj to 
have one of those 
really big parties 
where every K-Sttlt 
tluoerrt shews up and 
h«i good time 



of ttia campus? 
CotiaGUNQASSmBK 



BITTER 
SINATRA 

S3 Over 21 
IS Under 21 

Friday Aug. 28 

Wmrebam 
Opera lluuac 

410 Poynu 

Duui* Open it V p.m.! 



Warm It Up! 

TUrn up the beat at 

your next party with 

WetlWairlMltSI 
•FREEDefrmy 
•FWESttVp 
•OIL TVDAV 



537-1821 



wsfn 






=t 





HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 






105- 



A HOUSE with three 
bedrooms and three 



bathrooms near 
cempue. Central air and 
hasting. S600. 537 -043S 

AIR CONDITIONED, very 
cleen one. two, 
tn roe-bedroom unite. 
Furnished or unfur- 
nished. Quiet 
surroundings far sehoua 
students. Nino month 
lease available. No 
pels 537 8389. 

CLOSE TO cempua very 
nice, one. two, 

three and lour 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great prices. 

537-2919, 637-1666 

NEWLY REMODELED three- 
bedroom, two 
bath, one-helf block 
from campus No 
pats. 770-1340. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



■■■am 



M* 



August 27, 1992 4 -fl 



Collegian Classifieds 




CLOSE TO cimpus very 
nice, one, two. 
three and four 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great price*. 

537-2919, 537-1666. 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath, central air, 
laundry, near campus, 
537-8800 

LARGE TWO BEDROOM, 
weal tide location. 
Pool, central air. 

dishwasher, activities. 
Available now. $449. 
539-7489. 

SPACIOUS. VERY dean two- 
three bedroom. 
two bath, air 
conditioned, laundry 
hook- 
ups. Watarbeds 
accepted. Quiet 
surround- 
ings for serious 
students. No pets. Also 
one 

and two bedroom units. 
537-8389 

THE PERFECT roommate 
apartment. Nine 
month leases. Extra 
large two-bedroom. 
Two private baths. 
Washer and dryer in- 
cluded. Dishwasher. 
Swimming pool. Pri- 
vate balcony. 
Immediate availability. 
Up- 
perclassmen and 

J |r actuate students pre 
erred. Call 776-8641. 

TWO-BEDROOM. TWO- 
three individuals. 
Nice, clean. Campus 
one and one-half 
blocks. Aggieviile one 
block. Balcony, big 
bathroom and closets. 
No pets. Take over 
lease immediately. 539- 
3123, leave mes- 
sage. 



WANTED 

Students looking for 

living accommodation; 

with their own 

bedroom within a 

a-bedroom town home. 

In unit amenities include: 

* Dtstrntshtt 

* Mkwwtm 

* Huhen A Dntn 
Complex also includes: 
*HotTubs 
*5^tofley4iJ/C«rt 

As km as: 
StWmonth pet person 
Will match roommates 

if necessary. 
Call tor an appointment 



776-3804 





SHARE FEMALE non- 
smoking, two-bed- 
room apartment, own 
room, less than 
one block from campus. 
utilities paid, 

negotiable. Call 
776-6683. 



Far Neat- 



120— 



A HOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 
campus. Central air and 
heeling. $600. 537-0428. 

AVAILABLE SEPT. 1 four- 
bedroom. Located 
1715 Poyno. Two bath. 
fireplace, wash- 
er/ dryer, yard. $620 
plus utilities, lease 
plus deposit 539-3672. 

TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE, 
two and one-half 
miles (mm Town Center 
on Highway 24. 
776-1340. 



135 



FREE ADVICE Purchase a 
mobile home. 

We finance low 
payments; two- 
bedroom, 

$149.75 monthly. 
Countryside 539-2325. 




FEMALE- NON-SMOKING 
roommate wanted 
immediately. Share 
attractive four-bad- 
room with friendly/ 
trustworthy room- 
mates. $182/ month 
one fourth reason- 
able utilities. Call 
539-4158. leave mes- 



MALE NEXT to campus/ 
Aggieviile. Si 75, 
537-0289 

MALE ROOMMATE, 
graduate student non- 



smoking to share two 
bedroom apart- 
ments. One block to 
campus, share bath- 
room, furnished. 
Washer, dryer. $176 
plus electricity. 
776-4776. 

MALE ROOMMATES 
wanted. Two- three 
rooms available. 
Brittnay Ridge estate. 
Call 

Darin, 776-0589. Leave 
message. 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate to share 
two-bedroom duplex. 
Call 776-0402. 

ONE FEMALE roommate 
needed imme- 

diately I Non-smoker to 
share three-bed- 
room house with two 
other girls. Rent $110 
plus one-third utilities. 
Just behind Rams- 
da Inn. We're waiting for 
your call. 776- 
3655. 

ONE NON-SMOKING female 

roommate need- 
ed to share three- 
bedroom apartment 
dose to campus. Please 
call 776-3421. 

ONE NON SMOKING 
female. $134 per 
month plus one -fourth 
utilities. One and 
one-half blocks from 
campus. 776-2076. 

ONE- THREE non-smoking 
females, farm- 

house, barn, pasture 
for horses, cattle, 
dogs. Prefer Veterinary. 
Animal Science. 
Horticulture majors. 
Possible rent in ex- 
change for horse 
training or light cattle 
and 

horae chores. 776-1205. 
8pm- 9pm or P. 
O. Box 1211 

OPENING FOR two male 
student roommates 
in a three-bedroom, one 
and one-half 

bath apartment in a 
complex 537-7087 
or 537-2470. 

ROOMMATE WANTED for 
farmhouse six 

mies from town. Horse 
facilities $125/ 

month plus utilities. 
539-2029 

ROOMMATE WANTED to 
share (hree-bed- 
rooe*. own room. $116/ 
moeth plus one- 
eighth utilities. 537 
9321. 



ROOMMATE WANTED One 
block from cam- 
pus and Aggieviile. 
$125/ month, one- 
fourth utilities, own 
bedroom in house 
wiitteasy going guys. 
537-2055 

SERIOUS. NON SMOKING 
female roommate 
to share a one-bedroom 
apartment-- par- 
tially furnished. Call 
539-1586. 

THREE BEDROOM ON 

Milkiest with two oth- 
ers, walking distance 
KSU. Laundry 

facikties. garage $235/ 
moeth. Leave 

message with Karen 
5397495 

TWO ROOMMATES needed 
immediately. 
Four bedroom house, 
one block from 
campus, own room; 
$175 plus one-fourth 
utaaBs Travis 776-9319 
leave mea- 




NON- SMOKING FEMALE to 
sublease two- 

becVoo* apartment. 
One block from cam 
pus. $185 plus one third 




SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



205 



TUTORING HELP available 
for math, physics, 
end FORTRAN 

programming. Call 
Chetan 
at 537-1539. 




A FIVE minute walk from 
Aggieviile. Pa- 

pers, letters $1.25 
double spaced Same 
day sligMty higher. Ask 
about resumes. 
Call 776-1534. 

RECOGNIZE THIS? We're 
still here! Utilite 
my B.S. in English.' 
Speech for papers/ 
editing; my ten years 
personnel man- 
agement for resumes. 
$1.25 double; let- 
ter quality. Call Janice 
537-2203 



225a 



Pregnane) 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



ui prcjs 

iNlllll! 

"l.lIK Ll 



»S . J..N UMllls 

*( .lli I. II 

I tiij icn ^ limn 
LMinpu> in 

\:iikfv)fl ViilittK 



Mon.-Fri. 
^ a.m.-5 p.m. 



235 



CtiMCart 



BABYSITTING BV teacher 
and mother in her 
home 7 to 5: 30 Monday 
through Friday. 
Two years old and up. 
Call 776-2174. 

DEPENDABLE. NON- 
SMOKER needed to 
care for five year old 
after kindergarten, 
and eight year old after 
School in my 
home., located near 
Amanda Arnold. Must 
hava child care 
experience and own 
trans- 
portation. References 
required. Hours will 
be 11:20a.m.- 5:30p.m., 
Monday- Friday, 
Please call 537 7354 
after 630p.m for 
more information. 



MATURE AND experienced 

babysitter needed 
lor two great kids 
Monday. Wednesday. 
Friday 12:30- 4pm 
References required 
7764486 




MUSICIANS: RHYTHM 
guitar, keyboard, fid- 
dle, and steel players 
needed for an es- 
tablished country band. 
539-7265 or 587 
0384. 

WANTED: ALTERNATES for 
(doo- wop) vocal 
group. Need first tenor 
with high falsetto 
and tow bass. Perform 
around state, even- 
ings and weekends. 
Good pay. 776 4999. 
537-1741. 



250 



Autoewtnr* 
Repair 



NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 20 years 
experience. Auto Craft, 
2612 Dipper Lane, 
Manhattan, Kansas. 537- 
5049. 8a.m. 

5p_m. Monday through 
Friday. 




A LITTLE extra cash tor a 
chemistry text and a 
pitcher of beer. Cash 
Pawn IrGun. Inc 
1917 Ft Riley Boulevard 

HEALTH AND Auto 

Insurance. Call us be- 
fore buying the 
University Health Plan. 
Multi- line Agency. 555 
Poyntt Suite 

215. Tim Engle 
537-4661. 

LOSE WEIGHT. Increase 
energy. 100*. herbal 
capsule proven to burn 
body fat. boost en- 
ergy, and late off weight 
naturally. Call 

Julie at 539 4698 




The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of adwrtttements 
in the Employment 
classification. Readers 
ara adviaad to ap- 
proach any such 
employment opportunity 
with reason able caution 
The Collegian 

urges our readers to 
contact the Better 
Business Bureau. SOI SE 
Jefferson, Tope 

ka, KS 68607-1190, 
(B 131232-0464. 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

ASSISTANT with execu- 
tive secretary 
responsibilities. Full- 
time. 

Typing proficiency, 
Macintosh computer 
proficiency required. 
Apply in person 
with resume. Sager 



Dental Associates 
PA 514 Humboldt 

BABYSITTER NEEDED for 

two children in my 
home. Prefer live in. 
Must have time avail 
able from 6a.m. to 
7:45a.m. and 3p.m. to 
6p.m. Monday- Friday 
Some nights and 
weekends needed 
Prefer college girl with 
rural background Must 
be absolutely de- 
pendable I Need reliable 
transportation, ex 
cellent driving record, 
non-smoker. Musi 
enjoy children and have 
previous experi- 
ence* References 
required. Call 776-0140 
before 9p.m. and leave 
message. 

CMILDCARE PROVIDER/ 
teacher aide for 
weekday church 
program involving inf 
ants through preschool 
age children 

Must be available 8 30 
to noon on Thurs 
day mornings. Potential 
for additional 

hours. Childcare 
experience and refer- 
ences required. Apply 
by August 31 at 
the First United 
Methodist Church, 6th 
and Poyntz. 

CHILDCHfLDr NANNIES east 
coast nannies. 

NY, Conn , Long Island. 

and NJ areas. 
Live-tn one year 
commitments. $150 and 
up per week Immediate 
placements In- 

terviews and 

applications call 
18001858-2429. 

CHINESE RESTAURANT, 
kitchen help. Ex- 
perience preferred, part- 
time 539-2551 

COMPUTER SUPPORT and 
Programming po- 
sitions are available for 
K-State students 

with a variety of skills 
Support Technicians 
must have good 
interpersonal skills, have 
experience with PCs 
and popular software 
packages like 

WordPerfect. Lotus. 
dBase 

Mutt have a firm 
understanding of 
MSOOS and Windows, 
and have some 
programming skills. 
Software Developers 
and Network Assistants 
must have ex- 
perience with C/C**. 
data based man 
agement systems (SQL. 
dBase. Paradox) 
and with Novel'. UNIX. 
MS-DOS, and Wind- 
ows. GUI programming 
experience <n X or 
Windows 3.1 is 
especially helpful 
Applies 

tions will be available/ 
accepted until 

9/1^2 at 211 Umberger 
Hail. 

LOOKING FOR advertising, 
public relations. 
or business major 
interested m being 
classified student 
advertising manager 
for the Kansas Stata 
Collegian adver- 
tising department Must 
have a flexible 
schedule, be able to 
work at least 3- 4 
hours per day. and have 
excellent tele- 

phone skills. For 
applications and further 
information contact 
Annette or Gloria at 
532-6560 

MANHATTAN FLORAL is 
accepting appli- 
cations for a full-time, 
year round secre- 
tarial position. Apply 
in person at 630 
Poyntz Ave. 

OFFICE STUDENT Help- 1- 
5, Monday- Fri- 
day. Must hava 

computer experience. 
$4.25/ hour. Contact 
Pat, 537-7050. 



PART-TIME HELP needed 
mornings, after- 
noons and evenings. 
Apply in person 
8530 East Highway 24. 

PART TIME HELP on 
commercial hog. cat- 
tle and crop farm. 25 
miles northeast of 
Manhattan Travel 
allowance given. 
Farm experience 
helpful. Must have at 
least F r i . afternoons 
available. Call 

457-3440 before 8a m. 

PART-TIME MANAGER- to 
hire/ train sales 
and management 
personnel Good com- 
munications skills 
required. Recorded 
message reveals details 
537-2662. 

PART-TIME MASSAGE 
Therapist 10 lo 12 

hours per week, 
afternoons. Will train. 
Therapeutic Massage 
7760022. 

STUDENT COMPUTER 
Consultant. 15 20 
hours per week, to start 
as soon as possi 
ble, as a consultant for 
faculty, staff, and 
students. Selection 
criteria will be a com- 
bination of paid work 
experience. Micro 
computer, mainframe, 
and UNIX knowl- 
edge; grade point 
average; and longevity 
potential. Applications 
will be accepted by 
Joyce Henderson, 
Room 26, Cardwell 
Hall, through August 
31 EOE 

STUDENT OFFICE assistant 
needed 10- 15 
hours per week during 
fall and spring $e 
mesters. 30- 40 hours 
per week during the 
summer and possibly 
during school breaks 
and between semesters. 
Duties include 

word processing 
(WordPerfect!, book- 
keeping, answering six 
telephone lines, 
proofreading, typing, 
filing, and some 
heavy lifting Must be 
dependable and able 
to accurately follow 
instructions Work 
Study preferred but not 
required. Contact 
Oeb at 532 5970 

WANTED: WORK-STUDY 
student for office 
duties. 10-12 hours a 
week. Apply at the 
Industrial Engineering 
Office, Durland 

237 before Aug. 31. 



330 



OpeertwnrUet 



Tito Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of adverti— <mnts 
in the Employment 
classification. Readers 
• re advised to ap- 
proach any such 
•n^loyment opportunity 
wtth reasonable caution. 
The Collegian 

urges our readers to 
contact the Bettor 
■uajnoes Bureau, SOT SE 
Joffaraon, Tope 

ka, KS 68807 1 190 
(913)232-0484. 

$200- $500 weekfy Assemble 
products at 

home. Easy' No selling. 
You're paid di- 
rect. Fully guaranteed. 
Free informa 

tion — 24 hour hotline. 
801-379 2900 
Copyright SKS13KDH 

ALASKA SUMMER 

employment — fisheries. 
Earn $5,000 plus/ 
month Free transpor- 
tation) Room and 
boardl Over 9.000 
openings. No 

experience necessary 
Male or female For 
employment program 



call Student 

Employment Services at 



206 545 4155 
A5768. 



ext. 



ASSEMBLERS: EXCELLENT 
income. easy 

work assembling 
products at home. 
Seven day, 24-hour 
service. Information 
(504)646-1700. Dept. 
P6438 



GREEKS & CLUBS 



RASEACOOL 
•1000 

WJUrrONEWEEKJ 
PUS (1000 FOR THE 

MEMBER WHO CALLS,' 

No c&igU>ao. No cost. 

Yow mso pu i~KEX 

HEADfHOMlADIO 



l-BW-WKBa, EH 65 




OPEN 
MARKET 



410 



Items lor sale 



AMAZING 'ONE Day Diet' 
is sweeping the 
nation. Lose 16 to 20 
pounds in 30 days 
Guaranteed' No drugs, 
no ptHs. no 

blenders, no hassles 
Call 776-3656 

CARPET FOR dorm room 

Gray, used one 
year $50. Call 537-9700 
9 5 Monday 

Friday 

DOUBLE BED bunk. Nicely 
siamed wood 

with attached matching 
ladder and alarm 
clock shelves Very 
sturdy $50, call 
539 3316 

ENTERTAINMENT SET wrth 
CD player and 
dual cassette player 
Comes with detach 
able speakers $775 
539 4319 

FOR SALE: four cubic toot 
Avanti refrigerator, 
runs beautifully, has 
never needed serv- 
ice. $80. Call 1468 3381 

FOUR CUBIC foot 
refrigerator for sale Ex 
cellent condition, $90 
Call 776 4266 

FUTON FULL sue. frame 
$90. matrass $50 
Call Martina 537-2473, 
7p.m,- 10p.m. 

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS: 
Camoflage cloth 
ing. field jackets. 
overcoats, new G.I 
boots, sleeping bags. 
Also CARHARTT 
workwear Monday- 
Saturday. 9- 5 St 
Marys Surplus Sales 
St. Marys. KS, 
1-437-2734 

TOPEKA DAILV Capital 
Semester Special 776- 
1552. 

WINDOW UNIT air 
conditioners for sale 
28.000 BTU. $300 14,000 
BTU $50 

5.000 BTU, 110 volt, 
$75. 776-9069 



Classified Directory 




010 Announxsfiisnts 
020 Lost and Found 
030 Personals 
040 Mettingj£vi»nfi 
080 Partos-n-Mtye 




110 Rooms Available 
110 For Refit — Houses 
ISO For Sate -Houses 

130 For Rent - 

Mobile Homes 

13t ForSate- 

MOuW nOftrtJS 

140 For Rw! - Garage 
140 Roommaie Wanted 
180 Sublease 
180 Stable/Pasture 
180 Office Space 
188 Land lor Sale 



108 For Rent— 

Apt Furnished 

110 For Rem— 

Apt Unfumi»tied 




Tutor 



210 Resume/Typing 
21S Desktop F>ubW*ig 

Swmpy Alterations 
Pregnancy Tesimo 
230 LflwnCare 
238 CNdCare 
240 MuSfoans-'tUs 
248 PetServioss 
280 Automotive Repair 
288 Other Services 




EMPLOYMENT 
CAREERS 



310 Help Wanted 
310 Votunteers Needed 



Opportunities 



4^ 



OPEN 
MARKET 



408 WantedtoBuy 
410 Items tor Sale 
418 Furniture to Buy'Sei 
420 Garage/Yard Sales 
428 Auction 
430 Antiques 
438 Computers 
440 FoodSpeoart 
448 Musk Instrument 
400 Pets and Supples 
468 Sportinn Equpmeni 
400 Stereo Equpmenl 
Tickets to BuySeJ 




TRANS 

P0RTATI0N 



810 Automobiles 

820 Bicydes 

830 Motorcycles 

840 CarPoot 




TRAVEL 
TRIPS 



810 Tour Packages 
820 Airplane TK*«ts 
830 Train Tickets 
840 Bus Tickets 



CATEGORIES 

To help you find what you are 
looking tor, the classified ads 
have been arranged by category 
and subcategory. AH categories 
are marked by one ol the large 
images, and sub-caiegenes are 
preceded by a number 
designation 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always put whdl item or 
service you are advertising Irrsi 
This helps potential buyers find 
what they are looking for 

Don't use abbreviations Many 
buyers are confused by 
abbreviations 

Consider including the price 
This tells buyers if they are 
looking at something in their price 
range 

WE DO NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS OR LAST NAMES IN 
PERSONALS. 



AGGIE'S NEW TO YOU 
Second Hand Store 

537-8803 

•■14* I4»l»7,» IWIIn 



415 



Furniture to 
•uyfttU 



GREEN AND white couch 
$50. two green 
swivel chairs $5 a piece 
539-6896 

NICE. COMFORTABLE 
couch, 7 fast long. 
$100. Call, leave 
message. 537-1783 or 
532 6170. 

SMALL DORMITORY 
refrigerator, $50. 1992 
Scfiwinn Impact Pro 
mountain bike. 21 
inches. $350. 539-8762 

TWIN BED for sale 
Complete. $75 or best 

ar. Call 776-5582 and 
leave message. 

WHITE WICKER sik drawer 
fall lingerie 

chest. Excellent 
condition Great deal 1 
539-3075 

WOHLERS USED Furniture, 
615 North 3rd, 
539 3)19 Open 10am 
6p.m. Monday- 

Friday; until 8pm 
Thursdays; Saturday 
Sunday l Sp.m. 



Wohler's 

Used Furniture 

Open M-F 10-6 

Thursdays til 8 p in 

Sat & Sun. 1-5 p.m. 

615 N 3rd 539 3119 



420- 



Garset/Ykrd 



WE DON'T have roomi 
Many items like new. 
8'*13' blue carpet. 
appliances, full-sired 
bed. couch, chair, iilmlii 
■ crates. com 

pact vacuums, phones. 
coolers. drawing 

papet, fite folders, 
curtains and much 
more Call 776-7573 tor 
more informa- 

tion. 




386SX, VGA. two MB ram, 
89MB MD. five 
and one f ourth inch are] 
three and one 
half inch drives, mouse, 
modem $1250 

of best offer Call 
539-7795. 

IBM-PC. COLOR screen. 
keyboard, mouse. 
Epson printer $550. 
Doug 537-7054. 

NOTEBOOK COMPUTER. 

Toshiba T2200SX, 
38620MHZ.60MBIwd 
drive, vary smell 
and compact, only 5 5 
pounds. Microsoft 
ball point mouse 
included. Must sell. 537- 
0468 




INTERESTED IN owning a 
pel, but cats and 
dogs aren't allowed? 
Get a rabbit, they 
are a great substitute. 
Cell 539 7128 

TEN- GALLON aquariums 
$10.99 special. 

Hand fed cockaliels. 
love birds etc. Visit 
our store for complete 
bird supplies Peti- 
n Stuff, 1105 Waters. 
539 9494 




CD PLAYER- Technics, single 
disc pro- 

grammable, remote 
compatible, $100 or 
best offer 532-2573. 
Jon. 

FOR SALE: Alpine pull-out 
car stereo. Clari- 
on three ways. Like 
new. Make offer. 
776-0757 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 




1976 DODGE Dart 71.000 
miles. Runs well 
$1000 Of best offer call 
5398333. 

1976 DODGE Monaco, two 
door. Reliable 

$800 537 8804 

1978 fMPALA 350. automate 
transmission. 
Best offer Call 539-2453 
before lle.m 

or after 6p.m. 

1968 FORD Escort, excellent 
condition. $1000 
□r best offer. 539-4990, 
ask for Juice. 

CHEAPI FBI/ U.S. seiied 
1989 Mercedes 

$200. 1986 VW $50, 
1987 Mercedes 

$100 1965 Mustang 
$50 Choose from 
thousands starting $25 
Free information 
24 hour hotline. 1801) 
3792929. Copy 
i^ht number KS13KJC. 

PROTECT YOUR vehicle 
from the elements. 
Have your car waxed 
before winter sets 
in Call for pricing and 
appointment 
587-0384 

VW BUG 1975. new, rebuilt 
engine, good In- 
terior, $1350 call 
Martina 537-2473 
7p,m .- 10p.m. 




12- SPEED Elite tour bicycle- 
new- $125 or 
best offer {913)785 
2604 

1990 SCHWINN MOS Impact 
mountain bike 

Call 539 0507 for 
information. 

1990 TREK 1100 58 cm 
Shimano 105. Can 
776-7091. 

GOOD TOURING 12-speed 
bike Nishiki In- 
ternational, suntou' 

components $195 
Doug Fox 537-7054. 

WOMEN'S 10 speed, 2V 
Fuji ridJen less 
than 50 miles, perfect 
condition. $90. 776 
9435 




1990 HONDA CBR 600 
excellent condition, 
$2950, 537 9674. 

1992 ZX7 Ninja. Showroom 
condition match 
ing cover, helmet, 700* 
miles, under war ■ 
ranty $6500 Days 
539-1926, evenings 
537 0343 ask for Brirt 



GET 
THE 




OUT 




What do you do if you see a 
fire? 

1. Call 91 1 

2. Then call us 



News Tips 

532-6556 



Kansas State Collegian 



A 9 Au fl u »* 27, 1092 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 







THURSDAY 



imi m 





■ 



Pfivoeil Pirl 





>rir*>*l PrW*>*\ PrWoal 



Last Chance T-Shirts 




Tapes & CDs 

AND 




i? imm) mm! 



IW 



Giveaways ALL Night! 



iDy^Hatnburgere from 5-3p.m. 
Ru sty's way of saying 

WELC0ME 0ACK CATS/ 

NO COVER! NEVER HAD IT! NEVER WILL! 







QustiTs 

(Dutbacc 



1213 Mora 

Aggieville 





. 



r 



lw )r 5**' 



C KANSAS STATE ! 
OLLEGIAN 



INSIDE 




' a? f\ ^ 




PAINT WARS 


iHH^HHMOia 






AUGUST 28, 1992 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99, NUMBER 5 



iraq "mmmm 



Flight ban 
enforced 
with U.S. 
warplanes 



ASSOCIATED PRESS 



WASHINGTON — U.S. warplanes swooped 
into southern Iraq Thursday to enforce a coalition 
ban on all flights by Iraqi aircraft. 

Saddam Hussein's government denounced the 
no-fly zone and threatened retaliation in due 
time. However, the Pentagon said no Iraqi planes 
had challenged the prohibition of flights below 
the 32nd parallel. 

Pentagon spokesman Bob Hall, speaking at a 
news conference almost two hours after the 
10:15 a.m. EDT ban went into effect, said, "As 
of this moment, or as of about five minutes ago. 
(here has been no activity to prevent the 
monitoring regime that we've undertaken." 

He said F-I8s, based on the aircraft carrier 
Independence, and F-15 fighters were patrolling 
the skies of southern Iraq, and the military was 
adding to its AWAC and RC -135 reconnaissance 
plane force in the Persian Gulf theater. British 
and French planes are moving into the region to 
participate. Hall said. 

President Bush announced the ban on 
Wednesday, saying one purpose was to prevent 
any attacks on coalition surveillance planes 
monitoring Iraqi military activities in the 
marshlands of southern Iraq. Bush accused 
Saddam of attacking the Shiite people of 
southern Iraq, a violation of U.N. Resolution 688 
that requires Iraq to cease all suppression of its 
citizens. 

Shiite Muslims, who make up 55 percent of 
Iraq's population, were crushed when they rose 
up against Hussein following the Gulf War 
defeat, but they have kept up guerrilla operations 
based in the south. The Iraqi military has recently 
stepped up its attacks on the region. 

More than 20 American aircraft patrolled 
southern Iraq, with some flying escorts for 
British Tornadoes that help monitor the special 
zone. 

Pilots returning from the flights said no one 
fired any air-to-ground missiles or was locked 
onto by Iraqi radar, although aircraft flew over 
roads, rivers, airports and known surface-to-air 
missile sites. 

Pentagon sources, speaking on condition of 
anonymity, said they fully expect Saddam's 
forces to test the U.S. and allied resolution with 
possible cat-and-mouse ploys, perhaps by flying 
aircraft just over or quite near the border of the 
no-fly zone. 

However, Hall said that so far the Iraqis were 
avoiding confrontation. He also said Iraq had 
moved all its fixed- wing aircraft and most or all 
of its helicopters above the 32nd parallel. 

He said that of 40 flights on Thursday, all 
were above the line, and only two of 95 flights 

■ See IRAQ page 1 4 




DAVID MAYES 

Turbo, a 5-monin-old cat, stoically undergoes a flea-dip at the Little Apple 
Veterinary Clinic Thursday. Fleas thrived on the area's recent wet weather. 



Please, no 
more fleas 



MATHm ANDERSON 

Cotlcgim 

My dog has fleas. 

Students singing this familiar childhood tune are not 
alone. Many Manhattan residents are fighting never- 
ending battles with the pet-lovjng parasites. 

"In the last 30 days, we've seen a dramatic increase in 
cases," said Dr. William Fortney. assistant professor of 
veterinary medicine al the K- State Small Animal Clinic. 

Although the case total for the summer seems slightly 
down from previous years, Fortney said he is now seeing 
"hotbeds of fleas." 

The recent increase in flea population is credited to 
above-average precipitation in Manhattan in July, said 
Dr. Michael Dryden, assistant professor of veterinary 
medicine in the new department of pathology and 
microbiology. Dryden is the only flea biology researcher 
in the United States. 

A female flea lays between 30 and 40 eggs a day 
during its life cycle, Dryden said. Normally, only f«ur or 
five of every 1.000 eggs survive to adulthood. Many die 
during the second stage of life, the larval stage, which 
requires at least 50 percent humidity for survival. 

Most larvae live in carpeting, which can reach up to 
90 percent humidity at times, he said. 

"One of the reasons the flea problem has risen in the 
last lew decades is the predominance of wall-to-wall 
shag carpeting." he said. 

Because this July was one of the wettest months on 
record, he said, many more flea larvae survived the 
crucial period. Following the larval stage, the fleas form a 
cocoon and mature into adult fleas, which may take 
several weeks. Because of this lime lapse, Dryden said, 
the adult fleas are now a problem. 

Adult flea populations will naturally decrease as fall 
approaches. Dryden said. 

"In Kansas, the air tn the winter is very dry. and it 
eliminates the problem because the larvae can't survive," 
he said. 

Dryden said the cat flea, which is the common flea 
that infects cats and dogs in the United States, originated 
in Africa in a jungle-like environment. 

Until the humidity decreases, however, fleas are stilt a 
nuisance for pets and owners. Pet owners spent $871 
million last year in the United Slates to kill fleas, he said 

Fleas rarely carry diseases, Fortney said, but they 
cause severe discomfort to the animals infected. Those 
animals allergic to the bites suffer even more, he said. 

Spraying and dipping the animals will provide 
temporary relief, but the only way to control the problem 
is to treat the environment. 

"You have to look at the whole flea problem," he said. 
"Most fleas are in the environment, in the form of larva 
or premature fleas, or even adult fleas waiting for the 
animal." 

Fortney said he recommends using a combination of a 
house logger and spraying or dipping the animal Also, 
treating the outdoor environment is important, although 
only shady and damp areas need to be treated. 

Dryden recommends foggers and sprays that include 
insect-growth regulators, which is often indicated on the 
label. In addition to the insecticides that are applied to 
kill adult fleas, the regulator prevents the eggs and larvae 




"In the last 
30 days, 
we've seen 
a dramatic 
increase in 
cases.** 

WILLIAM FORTNEY 



t See FLEAS page 1 1 



NEWS DIGEST 


► PRO-LIFE LEADERS JAILED 


► SEX HARASSMENT ALLEGED 


HOUSTON (AP) — 


Randall Terry and the 


LAWRENCE (AP) — 


Gene Budig's intention to 


Two leaders of the pro-life 


Rev Joe Slovenec in 


Details of sexual - 


dismiss Emil Tonkovich, a 


group Operation Rescue 


contempt of Ihe 


harassment allegations 


tenured professor, over 


were jailed Thursday for 


temporary restraining 


against a University of 


claims by former and cur- 


violating a court order to 


order. They can be 


Kansas law professor 


rent law students that he 


keep their distance from 


released if they swear in 


were aired Thursday in a 


used his position as a 


abortion clinics during the 


court they won't violate 


public hearing before the 


professor to take advan- 


Republican National 


the order again. If not. 


Tenure and Related 


tage of them for sex. His 


Convention. 


each could spend six 


Problems Committee. 


attorney, Lisa Ford of 


State District Judge 


months in jail. Each was 


Wednesday, KU 


Kansas City. Mo., called 


Eileen O'Neill found 


fined $500 


announced Chancellor 


the case a "witch hunt." 



STUDENT SENATE 



Lihrary, Rec architects named 



■ Two 
Manhattan 
architectural 
firms have 
been selected 
to make the 
Farrell Library 
and Rec 
Complex 
renovations. 



Collegiin 

University Architect Skyler 
Harper named the architectural 
firms for work on Farrell 
Library and the Rec Complex 
in the first Student Senate 
meeting of the semester 
Thursday night. 

Brent Bowman and 
Associates of Manhattan were 
selected Aug. 26 by a state 
panel to design the renovations 
of Farrell. In the past, 
Bowman's firm collaborated on 
the design of the Chicago 
Public Library. 



Also announced was the 
approval of the Ken Ebert 
Design Group, also of 
Manhattan, for the expansion of 
the Chester E. Peters 
Recreation Complex. 

Student Body President 
Jackie McClaskey said, "There 
are not very many cases in the 
history of K State when 
students have been involved in 
a project of this magnitude 
every step of the way. 

"We are setting a very 
strong precedence in thai we 
are going to be involved as 
student*," »he said. 



Construction of the library is 
slated to be completed within 
four years, while the Rec 
Complex is expected to be 
finished within two years. 

In other Senate business, a 
first reading of a motion 
designed to carry over $595 
from the 1992 fiscal year 
budget to the 1993 budget was 
heard. 

The purpose of the motion 
would serve as a defrayment of 
cost senators incur during their 
retreat this weekend. Correal 
cost per senator is $22.50, 

■ See SENATE page 14 




Flick of the wrist 



■MM HACKaftCotegian 



Michael Burton, junior in landscape architecture, launches a flying disc through • 
target at the Breath Savers booth during Campus Fest Thursday morning. 



■■■l 



2 August 28, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



COMMENTS 



"It's nice to get the publicity, but it might not get me into the 

NFL. There are only 28 teams that need a center. So, my 

chances are slim. That's why I study hard in school." 

— Quentin Neujahr, center for the K- State football team . 

"... Football usually doesn't get turned around if the president 

doesn't care. (Jon) Wefald is the first Kansas State president 

since Milton Eisenhower, who was in charge from 1943 to 

'50, to care about football — or, to be more precise, to 

understand the enormous role that the sport plays in the public 

perception of a university. 

— Douglas S. Looney in his Aug. 31 Sports Illustrated article 

"The Power of Positive Thinking" about the Improvement 

of the K-State football team. 



"I personally feel very betrayed." 

— Pat Bosco, vice president for institutional advancement, 

on receiving only a percentage of the enrollment- 
adjustment funds promised by the state Legislature In the 

last six years. 

"Short of a flame thrower, you're not going to kill them." 

— Dr. Michael Dryden, assistant professor of veterinary 
medicine, on handling fleas on pets. 



"It's not Hollywood, this ain't Walt Disney. This is about the 
state of race relations in the world." 

— Filmmaker Spike Lee in Wednesday's Los Angeles Times, 
asking blacks to skip work or school to see his film 

■ X." 



"There are going to be a lot of broken hearts when they see the 
damage that was done." 

— Rita Folse, a cashier at a restaurant in New Iberia, La., 
Hurricane Andrew swept through the area. 



POSTMASTERS NOTICE 



The lUnus SUM Con*g>an [USPS ?9i «0i. a Cudrn imittur u njj-m, Staaa Unwytf '« 
pubUDM By StuOtrt Putmcanoii \K Ktamnaf 103 Manhattan Kan M.S06 Tr** Coaogjan a 
i»» *»nng ;ht scnoot •**■ and two* a **>*k through tr>* i-jmm*- Sacane' aata 
lanmti Manhanan Kan . C65Q2 
POSTMASTER Sand aoonm efianoas to Kanaa* Stmt Cfloooj*-)-. OojWton <MW Knot* Ma. 

i. w. WIT in 

N«w» centnoutiona »u oa aooapiao o> laiaphona ;9i3i W2-6SS*. or * «t* Coiiffan naowoom. 
1116 

inqo>n«i osncamng local, national ana cuiv***! c*«*ay aava-tia-rio, a»outa M t*r*e«*o to (9 1 3i 
HHM 

■ ' , ' .. , i i ■ i , , .a 



POLICE REPORTS 






K-STxreroucE 



These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the KSU Police 
Department. Because of incomplete information in the log. not ail campus 
crimes ate listed here. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 .MHBWMHMi 
Thaw*. iH no activity reported on lh« K-Stata PoHc* log. 



RILEY CX)UNTYPOUa 



These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the Riley County 
Police Department. Because of space constraints, not all crimes appearing 
in the log are published. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 



At 12:37 a.m. Staci K. BUckwe-ll, 
347 Good no** Hall, was given ■ notice 
to appear tor minor In possession of 
alcoholic beverage In Silverado 
Saloon. 

At 12:13 a.m. Alison M. Turner. 
11535 RoMhlll, Overland Park, was 
glv*>n a notice to appear tor unlawful 
us* of Kansat driver s Meant* In 
Kit** Bar and Grill*. 

At 12:13 a.m. Jennifer A. Glassca. 

J 9610 Brook hoi low. Wichita, wa* given 

' a nolle* lo appear for unlawful use ot 

Kansas driver's license In Kite s Bar 

and Gn I le. 

At 2:16 •.m. Camilo E. 
Estremadoiro, 931 Biuemont St., was 
arrested for QUI and released on 
$1,000 bond. 

At 4:47 a.m. Bradley H. Goman, 
236 Putnam Hall, reported criminal 
damage was dona to his vehicle 
Estimated toss wss $200. 

At 9:16 am. Blu* Hills Dutch Maid, 
2309 Tultle Creek Blvd., reported a 
theft Loss was $14.1 2. 

At 11 02 a.m. Susan Cowsert. 1435 
Anderson Ave.. Apt. No. 20, filed an 



attempted vehicle burglary report. 
Damage was done to her car window. 
Loss was $175. 

At 12:16 p.m. Jason Bssslngsr, 
1415 Anderson Ave., reported the 
black top of his Samurai was stolon. 
Loss was $160. 

At 1:05 p.m. a found-property 
sheet was tiled in reference to a bike 
found in the City Park. 

At 1:40 p.m. Prime Time Sports 
Card, 607 H. 11th St., reported a theft 
of baseball cards. Loss was $1 ,300. 

At 3:06 p.m. I Cant Believe Its 
Yogurt, 705 N. nth St , filed a theft 
report. Loss was $1 ,226 in currency. 

At 3:50 p.m Dairy Queen, 1015 N. 
Third St., filed a past forgery report. 
Loss was $26. 

At 4:19 p.m. A male was reported 
masturbating in the city pool area In 
Ogd*n. The subject left the scene. 

At 5:30 p.m. First Presbyterian 
Church, 104 N. Broadway, Riley, tiled 
a theft report of 260 silver pieces. 
Loss was $5,400, 



WEATHER 




TOMORROW'S FORECAST 

Sunny, high in the 90s 




EXTENDED FORECAST 

Sunday through Tuesday 
Lows in the 50s. 



u 



Little or no rain. Highs SO to 85 



CAMPUS BULLETIN 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 28 



■ CHIMES will meet from 7 to 8 p.m. in Union 208. 

■ Intramural Entry Deadline for flag football, soccer and individual 
sports is 5 p.m. in the Recreational Services Office. 

■ The Graduate School has scheduled the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of John I. Haynes II at t :30 p.m. in Ackert 
133. 

■ Registration deadline for the mock LSaT is 4:45 p.m. in 
Eisenhower 113. 

■ CNS will sponsor the following computer lectures: 'Using the 
CMS operating system on the University mainframe" at 1 1 :30 a.m. 
in Cardwell 101 : and "Using the Xedit editor on the University 
mainframe" at 12:30 p.m. in Cardwell 101; and "Using the vi editor 
on the University mainframe" at 3:30 p.m. in Cardwell 101. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 

■ Black Student Union and Black Faculty Staff Alliance will meet 
for a Welcome Back Picnic from noon to 4 p.m. at City Park Shelter 
Welcome Back Concert will be from 4 to 8 p.m. at Memorial 
Stadium. 

■ "We Have A Dream" community celebration will be from 6 to 9 
p.m. in Triangle Park in Aggieville. 

■ SGA will meet for retreat departure at 7:15 a.m. at the Union's 
south entrance. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 30 

■ The College of Education will sponsor an ice cream social for 
new education students at 6:30 p.m. on the front lawn of Biuemont 
Hall. 

■ Intervarsity Christian Fellowship will meet at 7:30 p.m. in Union 
212. The topic will be boldness. 

■ Intramural Flag Football Official's Meeting will be at 6:30 p.m, 
in Union 206. 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 



TODAY'S FORECAST 

Today, sunny, and warmer, high in the mid-8Qs. South wind 
1 to 15 mpn in ttie afternoon. Tonight, dear, low in the 
mid- 50s 



GOODLANO 

8050 



MANHATTAN 

76/52 m 






TOPEKA 

*. 78/59 



RUSSELL 

80/50 



SAS 



GARDEN CITY 

m 83/48 



WICHITA 

* 81/57 



KAN: 

CITY 

N/A 



COFFEYVILLE ' 

75/62 



WORLD TEMPERATURES 



CITY 

Auckland 
Budapest 



51 46 



SKY 

ram 



9461 



clear 



Caracas 



8264 



cloudy 



Hong Kong 


90/82 


deaf 


Jo'burg 


57/43 


rain 


Rone 


88*4 


dear 


Toronto 


87/68 


doudy 



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Looking for 
me perfecs gift? 

Gift Coins 
available for any 

occasion. 



1231 MORG • 776-7373 

BE STREE3$MART • SHOP STREETSIDE! 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 


Au^ 28, 1992 3 














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Spiderman cmycokowrco.^ 

Ryan Fast, senior in parks and recreation administration, tries to secure a foothold while climbing up the west wall of Memorial Stadium Wednesday afternoon. Fast is a member of the KSU Rock Climbing Club. 








PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE 



Jardine residents offer assistance to storm victims 



Students collect goods to replenish 
Concordia food bank, help with cleanup 



UU4ASCHRATER 



A damaging windstorm hit 
Concordia in fate June and moved 
on. Thai's when Jardine Terrace 
Apartment residents came in to 
help. 

Fifteen Jardine residents drove to 
Concordia June 26 lo offer victims 
assistance. 

They took with them almost 



1 ,000 pounds of food, which was 
collected from Jardine residents, to 
replenish the Concordia Food Bank. 
C. Charles Walters, executive 
mayor for Jardine and junior in 
political science and history, said he 
partially credited KSNT TV In 
Topcka for motivating him to 
organize the efforts. 

"KSNT released the story — 
they shot live from Concordia 



shortly after the storm. As I was 
watching this, a volunteer said. 
'Well, our biggest challenge is thai 
our people arc getting tired,*" 
Walters said. '"We're running out 
of people and there is so much to 
do.* So I said, we're a public 
service organization, there's no 
reason we can't pitch in with some 
help." 

American Red Cross chapters 
from Wichita, Salina. Kansas City 
and Topcka were also brought in to 
assist the Cloud County chapter. 

"Our chapter is kind of small, so 



the other Red Crass chapters were 
there for 17 days to help." »Jid 
Gene Johnson, chairman of Cloud 
County chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

When the Jardine group arrived 
in Concordia, the Red Cross 
volunteers divided the group in two. 

"Half our volunteers helped 
clean up what was left of the trailer 
park. I've never seen anything like 
this The trailers were twisted and 
broken and wrapped around things. 
it was awful," Walters said. 

Pieces of homes were picked up 



and thrown in trucks. 

"The other half helped a 
particular older lady repair her roof. 
The storm ripped the roof right off," 
Walters said. 

Her home was built in 1872, and 
after the storm, the volunteers did 
not feel the home was repairable. 

"We talked to Red Cross about 
trying to help her move out. 
Hopefully she's out by now," said 
Sherry Askew, Jardine mayor of F. 
G. J. and K and senior in 
elementary education. 

This is the first time Jardine has 



left town for a public service event. 
Other service projects include an 
international festival, recycling and 
donating the proceeds to the 
Salvation Army, and educational 
events such as stress management, 
resume planning, cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation (CPR) and a story 
hour. 

In the future, Walters said, they 
would like to have an aerobics 
instructor come to Jardine to teach 
classes. 



WORK SMARTER 
NOT HARDER. 



Engineering student? 
Smart. 
Math or science 
major? Also smart. 

On tests, you probably run 
equations over again to make 
sure they're right. So you're 
working harder. 

You don't have to do that 
anymore. Not when you use 
the Tl-68 Advanced Scientific 
or TI-85 Graphics Calculator, 
with their last equation replay 
feature — and many other 
smart functions. 

We've spent years with 
students like you 




and educators like your profes- 
sors to develop the Tl-68 and 
the TI-85. That's why they're 
so highly recommended. 

For engineering students, the 
Tl-68 solves up to five simul- 
taneous equations, has complex 
number functions and offers 
formula programming. 

The Tl-85 builds on the 
power of the Tl-68 by adding a 
wide range of graphing capabil- 
ities. Math students can handle 
calculus problems more easily. 
And technical students can see 
the functions for a better 
understanding of problems. 

The Tl-85 afco handles 



complex numbers. Matrices. 
\tvtors. Lists. Strings. Plus, it 
offers a powerful one-equation 
SOLVER. 

Try a Tl-68 or Tl-85 at 
your local Tl retailer today. 
And start working smarter. 
Instead of harder. 

^r Texas 
Instruments 



Church Directory 



Unttarlan-UnlvcrMllit Fellowship 
S«rvtc« i Sunday School 10:45 a.m. 

rrw*Mdn*a KXvt 'n^wji Mfcd tar no* 
rtomMn cm &39-936S a UMStl 
*#' ZMKUwHa («!¥> 19} 
Sacona >•• o" »*y ins ai nMucs 



GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Morning Worship 8:30 & 10:45 

Collegiate Bible Study Sun. 9:30 am. 

International Bible Studies 

Sunday Evening Fellowship 

or Caring Cells 6 p.m. 

Family Night Wed. 7 p.m. 

Students Welcome! 

2901 Dickens 776-0424 



First Congregational Church 

Poyntz and Juliette 537-7006 

Sunday School: 9:30 
Worship: 10:45 



C$~Ko^ 




*S^!> V 



Rev. Donald 
Long bottom 







Evangelical 
Free Church 
of Manhattan 

MCC Chapel S.W comer I4tn a Anderson 

Steve Rattrff, Pastor 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

Worship 11 a.m. 

776-2086 

Nursery Provided 



Ckurck of CArist 

Ca/tytLt Mimsby 

Bible Study 9:30 a.m. 

Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. 

Evening Service 6 p.m. 




tlXfTVIEV COMKORT 
CBDDQI 

Welcome Back, Students 

Worship 10 am. 

Sunday School 9 a.m. 

Sunday Evening Worship 6 p.m. 

1st, 3rd, & 5th Sundays 

CARE CELLS (Small Groups} 

6 p.m. 2nd & 4th Sundays 

3001 Ft. Riley Brvd 537-7173 



Manhattan Mennonite 
Fellowship 

^A I orn l Framort M 4R I 

\^> Ham* H. Walner. Pastor 

Church School 8 30 am 

I Worship 9:45 am 



Manhattan 

Seventh -day 
Adventist Church 

Sabbath School 

10 Sat. 

Worship Service 

1 1:30 Sat. 

600 Laramie 

fat 6fh St.) 776*5533 



UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN 

2800 Claflin 

8:30 & 11 am. Worship 

9:45 a.m. Sunday School 

6:30 p.m. 

Sun. Eve. Service 

Handicapped Accessible 

776-5440 



ST. LUKE 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

(LCMS) 

Lutheran Student Fellowship 

(LSF) 

Campus Pastor, 

Rev. Frederick V. Smith 

Sun. Sand 10; 45 a.m. 

Sat. Worship 6 p.m. 

Bible Class Sunday 9:30 am 

330 N Sunset Ave 539-2604 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 

801 Leavenworth 537-0516 

Worship 8:30 & 11 a.m. 

Church School 9:30 a.m. 

•Weekday Programs for Youth 

•Nursery Available 

Pastor 

Rev. Warren Rutledge 




A CRESTVIEW 
(8h CHRISTIAN 
^ CHURCH 

English Worship 10:30 a.m 76:30 p.m. 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

Chinese Worship 1 p.m. 

4761 TYtttle Creek Blvd. 

(3 mik* north of Kimball Ave.) 

776-3798 



St. Isidore's 
Catholic Student Center 

Hum: Sat Sp.m. 

Sun 9:30. 11 »jn I S p.m. 

Conlaulon*, Sat 3:30 p.m. 
711 Dcftnon S39-7496 
Chaplain: Fathf Kwth Wahw 



FIRST LUTHERAN 
CHURCH 

Worship 8:30 & 11 am. 

Sunday School 9:40 am (tor u aoasi 

1Qth& Poyntz 537-8532 




Christian Science 
Church 

511 Westvlew Drive 

10 a.m. Morning Service 

10 a.m Sunday School 

Wednesday 7 30 p m Testimony Meeting 

Reading Room- 1 06 N 4th 

EVERYONE WELCOME 

Mon Noon-2, Tues , Thurs 11-1. 

Wed . Fn 1-3 

776-9146 



^-^ LIVING WORD 
CHURCH 

Services Sunday 10 am 
Wednesday 7pm 

l m»l« aoijh on Hwy 1 77 776-094 




PINION 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



The opinions expressed in In Our Opinion" are the opinions of a majority of Editorial Board 
members. These views do not necessarily represent the views of Kansas State University, Student 
Publications Inc or the A.Q. Mater School ot Journafiam and Mass Communcalrons 



Samaniha Branson Enn Perry Richard Andmfe Mm Han 

EMoanCNet AmvCoi Jodel! Lamti Tow Liittr 

, ,„ Shswn Bruce David M»y« MnfcEmler 

Sava S* Frank Kkemwn Derek Thomm David Hihpi 

Brian Andcnon lutie Long 



Option Page EdWor 



Marti Giacobe 



Column* are •*• opinions at 
only (he cofcrmfct They do not 
reflect fie view* of «w Kansas 
State CoHegten. but instead o*ar a 



UST28, 



AUG 



1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



In Qvr Qy^QN 



By the Collegian Editorial Board 



Voters: Demand satisfaction 



THE ISSUE 

A large 
wgwii nt of 
society has 
become 
resentful about 
elections In 



WE SUGGEST 

People need to 
take the 
initiative, 
research the 
candidates and 
demand debate 
on the key 



affect us all. 



It's pow up to our generation. 

Americans, especially in the 18-23 age 
group, have become overly cynical about the 
political system these days. 

But we've a right to be dubious. Bom during 
die Nixon years, our earliest political memories 
were of former presidents Gerald Ford and 
Jimmy Carter. 

Then came the Gipper, former President 
Ronald Reagan. Expecting a leader, we received 
instead the biggest tax increases in history, Iran* 
Contra, Red Dawn and the fear of nuclear 
Armageddon. 

Eight years later, we watched the nation 
elect President Bush because of a promise of no 
new taxes, right? Wrong. 

And in between the saga of presidential 
clowns, there was former Sen. Gary Hart, Oliver 
North and the ever-irresponsible Sen. Ted 
Kennedy to reinforce our pessimism. 

So we have a right to be cynical, to nol care 
and not vote, right? 

Wrong again. Because our parents and 
grandparents do vote. 

They decided former Gov. Michael Dukakis 
had a funny accent and name, so they voted in 
Gipper II, President Bush. 

They voted in the people who have run 
America into the ground. 

It's time to wake up. Generation Now. 



America isn't No. 1 anymore. Apple pie and 
yellow ribbons won't solve our problems. 

It's now up to us. We have to snap out of our 
self-pitying mode and vote. 

We have to take charge. If Generation Now 
were to vote en masse, we could be the most 
powerful lobby in the nation. 

If every single one of the 20,000 K -State 
students were to vote, we could make a difference 
in a close election. We could persuade politicians 
to fund education, clean up the environment and 
even clean up their own acts. 

If you don't like either presidential candidate 
— Bill Clinton or Bush — vote for the 
Libertarian candidate. 

Or, at least think before you judge. Do your 
own research on Clinton and Bush. Learn for 
yourself which is the better of two evils, and vote 
for him. 

But don't be caught sitting on your attitude 
come Nov. 3. 

Be informed. Demand pertinent issues from 
the media, not stories on sexual high jinks. 
Demand answers, not attacks on Hillary Clinton 
and family values. 

The deadline to register to vote in the 
general election is October 19. Don't wait until 
the last minute, register today. 

Now. 



Readers Write 



► CENSORSHIP 



Columnist misses 
ideas of separation 

Editor, 

After I finished throwing up, 
I felt compelled to write 
concerning John Hart's column 
"Civil liberties groups are real 
censors." 

Mr. Hart says the most 
censored group is the Judco- 
Christians, What Mr, Hart has 
failed to realize, however, is that 
the lawn of a courthouse is state 
property. The nativity scene is 
church. Find me an example of 
the ACLU banishing the nativity 
scene from the shopping mall. 
You can't do it. But I can find a 
lot of pinhead religious types 
who step into schools and censor 
books. 

Apparently, none of these 
people have ever read the Bible. 
It's one of the most violent 
books ever written. It condones 
murder, incest. sexism, 
cannibalism, and slavery. If you 
don't believe me. just read it. 

1 quote Article 6, Section 8 of 
the Kansas Constitution: "No 
religious sect or sects shall ever 
control any part of the common 
school or university funds of the 
state ..." 

This is separation of church 
and state. 

To end this. I'll state the 
following: I'm an atheist. And if 
I ever become a dad. 1*11 raise 
my child to be an atheist. And 
believe that I will not put up 



with any superstitious religion in 
my child's school. 

Kyle Married 
Senior/Undecided 

► NVTHITIOM 

Beef is victim of bad 
rap, missing facts 

Editor, 

I am writing in response to 
the July 30 editorial. The art icle. 
"Beef for real people — not" 
presented several opinions. I call 
them that because I know that 
they aren't facts from the classes 
I've taken. 

The main objective of the 
editorial, if I understand, was to 
convince people that beef is bad 
for you. I'll agree that almost 
anything in excess is bad for 
one's health. While vegetarian 
diets do provide more Tiber and 
less cholesterol, meats provide B 
vitamins and iron not available 
through vegetarian diets. 

A comment was made that 
"Cattle screw the environment." 
On the contrary, cattle provide 
many services, including 
controlling overgrow th of prairie 
through careful management, 
just to name one. 

The editorial said, "beef is a 
mere luxury." which, in a way. 
is true. My concern, though, is 
that the article was printed 
without research done to support 
the ideas given, and people who 
read such editorials may believe 
them. 

Heather Slayton 
Senior/Animal science 



WE'RE STILL WAITING 

Bring your letters by the Collegian. Tell us what you 
think. Say what you want to say. KEDZIE 116. 



Football's no good 




LISA 

Edmunds 



It's that time of year again. I 
don't have to consult a 
calendar to know that fall is 
here — all I have to do is venture 
outside and observe the parade of 
lunacy that passes by my front 
door. 

Yes, the natives have gone 
start-raving mad once more: It 
must be football season. 

I'm tempted to say that I hate 
football, that I loathe football 
season, but that's not true. It's not 
the sport that I truly detest, but all 
the testosterone-laden rituals that 
go along with the spectator end of 
the sport. 

Surely this love/hate 
relationship with football began 
early in life. My dad is a rabid fan 
of the Cleveland Browns, and he 
too had his rituals. His sacred 
Sunday afternoons in front of the 
television were frustrating for the 
rest of the family, but not a real 
honor. 

Thankfully, Dad is a quiet 
football fan. So. all that was 
required of the rest of the family 
was (o help him dodge phone calls 
for the duration of the game, and 
maybe refill his snack bowl or 
bring him a beer. 

It meant accepting thai your 
father would lapse into a self- 
induced coma for three hours 
every Sunday afternoon. If you 
wanted to spend quality time with 
htm, he was always happy to give 
you a running commentary or 
explain the rules of the game. But, 
it was no time to ask for help with 
math homework. 

Nice old guys like my dad 
hanging out in front of the TV, I 
can handle. It's the wild-child 
school of fanaticism that I really 
detest. 

I had my first exposure to 
football hell in high school. I 
attended a Catholic high school in 
Ohio that recruited kids from all 
over the region to play sports, and 
these folks were far too impressed 
with athletic achievement. Give 
me a pep rally for the National 
Merit Scholars any day. 

These people were so into 
football, we used to have a special 
mass on the morning of the big 
game, praying for victory. 

The Friday night game was the 
big social event for everyone. 



Being the main outlet for 
socializing, you almost had to 
attend, but I could never get into 
the whole "scream- 'till-you-puke" 
mode. Watching Sister Margaret 
out on the field in full habit 
screaming for blood was a surreal 
experience I may never recover 
from. 

Figuring this Neanderthal 
approach to the game was a high- 
school thing, I was happy to get to 
college and find that I could avoid 
the whole ritual. As an undergrad, 
I simply ignored the sports section 
of the paper and let the season 
pass without notice. 

Such is not the case in 
Manhattan. Last year's football 
season can only be described as 
"Nightmare on Vattier Street." 
The behavior (or rather 
misbehavior) of overzealous 
Wildcat fans turned the 
neighborhoods near Aggievillc 
into a scene only Freddy Krueger 
could imagine. 

The entire season was filled 
with incidents and insults, but the 
weekend of the KU game will live 
in infamy. You have to wonder if 
old Charles Darwin witnessed a 
K-State/KU football game. It 
would have blown the hell out of 
his evolution theories. 

Literally, there were masses 
dancing in the streets. There was 
no need to turn on the radio to 
hear the game, as it and Garth 
Brooks blasted up and down the 
avenue at ear- shattering decibels. 

It wasn't even safe to run 
across the street to the local Stop- 
's] -Rob for a pack of cigarettes, as 
innocent folks were harassed and 
accosted by drunken football fans. 
They brought chairs into the yard 
just to sit and yell abusive 
comments at anyone who wasn't 
hip enough to be as cool as 
themselves. 

All in all, it was real terror. 
Even the cops weren't much help. 
It was after 1 a.m. before they 
cracked down on the noise. 
Apparently football fans 
themselves, they took the "boys- 
will-be-boys" attitude, 

perpetuating and encouraging the 
wild-child behavior. 

As I ventured outside the next 
morning to pick up 33 beer cans, 
five wine bottles and two drunks 



TOLES 




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AND U#*K>rfL>i AJIV&K4M 



SomtVMtAf- 



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ID S,n*V v*tfr MW***e to 
PEOPLE W*M stow i£NO rwEM 

.»no sP*tE rdznn>*fS>tVKX>s 




Myths, half-truths run riot 
around the subject of rape 



Every six minutes, someone in the 
United States is raped. The FBI 
estimates that one in every three 
women will be sexually assaulted at 
some point in their lifetimes. 

Shocking? It should be. Moreover, 
the beginning of each school year 
provides a risk of sexual assault to 
unsuspecting women in their first 
semester of college. It is during that 
time of year when the nationwide 
frequency of acquaintance rape surges. 

Many men offer justification for the 
fact that rape occurs. Incredibly, there is 
a repertoire of disturbing myths 
circulating among the male members of 
society designed to perpetuate the 
patriarchal mindset that says rape is 
justified. 

The first myth is that women secretly 
desire to be raped, to be overpowered 
and abused in a violent, spontaneous 
rage. The false assumption here is that 
rape is an act of sexual expression. 

On the contrary, rape is an act of 
violent aggression entrenched in men to 
exercise power over women. It's not a 
biological phenomenon — it's a teamed 
behavior. The " women - secretly -de sire - 
it" myth is a lie designed to remove the 
basic worth of women as distinct 
individuals. 

A second common myth is "justified 
rape," the notion that women bring rape 
upon themselves. Men use nonverbal 
indicators — the way a woman is 
dressed, the people she associates with, 
or the fact that she consumes alcohol in 
the company of male companions — as 
an intention to have sexual intercourse. 

The fact is that women should be 
able to make choices concerning their 
own appearance and their own activities 




without risking being raped. 
Responding to rape victims with "you 
asked for it" is a classic example of 
blaming the victim. 

A third myth perpetuated by male 
culture is one centering on the 
occurrence of 
date rape. Men 
like to bctieve 
that when a 
woman says 
"no," she really 
means "yes." 
Oftentimes, "no" 
is interpreted as 
sexual fore play. 
When men 

proceed, 
regardless of 
whether further 
refusal occurs, 
the act of rape 
has been 

committed. 

At the root of the "no-means-yes" 
myth is that a large percentage of males 
don't view date rape as actual rape. 

What's needed is some way of 
clearly identifying the crime. 

In essence, the act of rape functions 
as an act of coercion. Women do not 
have to scream, kick, punch, braise or 
bleed for rape to occur. The absence of 
consent on the part of the woman is ell 
it takes. 

The bottom line: Just because a 
woman consents to a date, she is not 
consenting to sexual intercourse. 

Debunking the popular myths of why 
rape occurs is only ihe beginning. 
Another approach is finding a solution. 

The first step is recognizing thai a 
problem does indeed exist. Believe it or 



DAVID 
FlUPPI 



not. there are many instances where 
universities have attempted to play 
down and even cover up incidents of 
student sexual assault. College 
administrators, attempting to minimize 
negative publicity, try to preserve the 
image and reputation of their institution. 

A second step toward developing a 
solution involves making rape 
awareness and prevention programs 
available for students. They are 
available to K-State students, 
undoubtedly serving a vital function. 

Nevertheless, such services offer 
only a partial solution. Telling women 
they should never walk alone at night 
and should be careful of what they say. 
wear, and do only places the sole 
responsibility of rape prevention on 
women. In the end, the same stereotype 
that women are responsible if rape 
occurs is only reinforced. 

For as much as women do to protect 
themselves, it is the men who need to 
take some responsibility, because they 
are the aggressors. 

What can men do? Stop perpetuating 
the male myth that rape can somehow 
be justified. Strive toward changing 
socialization patterns. 

Even in Manhattan, men are 
socialized to believe it's good to be 
sexually aggressive — to "score." 
Relationships built on male dominance 
end female passivity must be questioned 
and altered. Moreover, organizations 
built upon the foundations of 
brotherhood and macho masculinity 
should be criticized and modified. 

Only when men become a part of the 
movement against the terror of sexual 
violence can progress be made toward 
ending rape. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 
MANHATTAN IMMMBM 



August 28, 1992 E 



S.H.A.R.E. helps underprivileged in Manhattan 



Volunteers keep 

organization 
alive and working 



Collegian 

The SHARE, program fulfills 
its name by helping underprivileged 
people in Manhattan. 

The Self-Help and Resource 
Exchange is helping people who 
need assistance by collecting and 
distributing household goods and 
used clothing in good condition. 

The program was established in 



Manhattan in I989 by the Flint 
Hills Junior Service League, an 
international service organization. 
The Flint Hills chapter serves the 
Manhattan, Fort Riley, Wamego 
and Junction City areas. 

"It's my understanding that 
S.H.A.R.E. was the original 
brainchild of the League of Women 
Voters, who had seen the program 
in another community," said Mary 
Catherine Tennant, chairwoman of 
S.H.A.R.E. 

The program is staffed 
completely by volunteers. Most are 
Junior Service League members, 



but more volunteers from the 
community are needed, 

Tennant is helped by two 
assistant chairmen and a committee 
of Junior Service League members. 
S.H.A.R.E. also works with the 
Manhattan Emergency Shelter and 
the Mini Hills Breadbasket. Most of 
the volunteers are employed full 
time, so. time to devote to 
S.H.A.R.E. is limited, she said. 

"Presently, the center is open 
three times a month. We would like 
to expand that, which is why we are 
seeking new volunteers." Tennant 
said. 



The S.H.A.R.E. center accepts 
household goods, kitchen items, 
sheets, towels, all types of clothing, 
toys, books and games. Household 
goods are especially needed now, 
she said. In addition, the center acts 
as a referral service for donations 
and people who need furniture and 
appliances. It asks all donations be 
clean and in working condition. 

The Junior Service League pays 
all of the utilities and a majority of 
the maintenance at the S.H.A.R.E. 
center. It also buys the basic 
supplies needed to run the program. 
So. cash donations are also needed. 



Families who need items go 
"shopping" on the distribution 
dates. The center asks that people 
take only what they need for 
themselves. A list is kept of items 
donated and of those distributed. 

The center has been able to serve 
large amounts of people in the small 
time it has been open. In August, 
1 89 people (more than 50 families) 
were helped in two Saturdays. On 
one Saturday in July, 1 22 people 
(32 families) were served. Families 
may only shop once a month. 

"Some of the families are regular 
shoppers, but some of those people 



bring the best donations," Tennant 
said, explaining that after the 
clothes have been outgrown, they 
arc often brought back. 

"It's really neat. They only take 
what they need and make sure it's 
in good shape when they return it," 
she said. 

Some K-Slate students are 
already involved with the program. 
"We had a good response from last 
year's class. So. we're doing it 
again." Mario said. 

The center, at 901 Yuma St., will 
be receiving donations from 6 p.m. 
to 9 pm. Oct. I and 7. 



NEWS YOU 
CAN USE 



C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 



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AUGUST 28, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FOOTBALL 



Season 
ticket 
sales up 
by 3,000 



More than 4,000 students bought 
season football tickets during fee 
payment last week, bringing the 
total tickets sold to 12.200. 

That's 3,000 more than were 
sold by this time last year. A total 
of 4.350 passes have been 
purchased by students — 4.1000 at 
fee payment. 

There arc three weeks left until 
the season begins. Five home 
games are scheduled. 

"We're pleased with the sale up 
to today, in particular with our 
student ticket sales," Associate 
Athletic Director Jim Epps said. 

The athletic department was also 
pleased with the large percentage 
of tickets bought at fee payment, 
Epps syid 

"I think because of the 
convenience factor — to just add it 
on to the fees — many students 
took advantage of it," Epps said. 

Epps said the department hopes 
to sell 15,000 season tickets before 
the season starts in three weeks. 

Traditionally, the rush on tickets 
peaks close to the first game. 

Based on the sold season tickets, 
Epps said the 42,000-seat KSU 
Stadium should be filled for the 
team's home opener against 
Montana Sept. 19, 

"We're making the effort to get 
a full stadium against Montana. We 
hope to set a standard for the 
remaining games," he said. 
"Ideally, we want the stadium filled 
up for each game. Realistically, we 
like to see crowds in the 30,000s." 

Season tickets are available 
from Jhe ticket office at Bramlage 
Coliseum until the end of next 
week. Tickets can be purchased at 
the K-State Union Sept. 8-18. 

K- State students with valid IDs 
pay S3 5 for the season pass. 
Tickets for the general public are 




Lacrosse 
gets TV time 



CRAM MACKIKCoUegian 

Ttlld Carpenter, sophomore in history, tries to escape the grasp of Shawn Turner, freshman in 
computer engineering, during a session of flag football Thursday at the Rec Complex. 



rrwi wock 

CoHefun 

The Wildcat football team won't be the 
only K-State squad enjoying newfound 
television exposure during the 1992 season 
— the lacrosse team will as well. 

The Bleachers Sports Bar and Grill has 
agreed to sponsor this year's squad and will 
televise each home game immediately 
following the contest on its 6- foot by 8- fool 
big-screen television. 

"I looked at this as a good opportunity 
to present our name to the public." said 
Brad Meyer, co-owner and manager of 
Bleachers. "This will be good for us." 

Bleachers, which has been in Manhattan 
for only a year, also footed the bill for 100 
lacrosse T-shirts. All profits will go straight 
to the team. 

The squad, which was sponsored a year 
ago by Pyramid Pizza, is excited about the 
opportunity to view the games on 
television. 

"We appreciate all that Bleachers has 
done for us," said Tondo Waldron, who 
struck up the deal with the bar and was last 
year's leading scorer. "The TV is 
awesome." 

The television, however, isn't the only 
thing Waldron said the squad is excited 
about. It also provides a place for the Cats 
to enjoy a cool one after the match. 

"It's great to have a place where the 
guys can go out after the game." Waldron 
said. "They have a pool table, and they 
serve beer. Those are our priorities. 

"The veterans are excited.'" he said. 

The K-State team won't be the only 
players at the bar after the battle — the 
Wildcats plan on bringing the opposing 
team, as well. 

Sponsoring a sport like lacrosse and 
serving them after the home games is an 
opportunity Bleachers welcomes. Meyer 
said. 

"Lacrosse is something that is growing 
around here," he said. "If it were something 
tike the Hackey-Saek team. I might not be 
as excited. But lacrosse has been attracting 
more and more fans." 

And the lacrosse team needed an 
opportunity like this to keep its head above 
water financially, Waldron said. 

The squad, which was allotted $596 
from the University for the entire season, 
had to exercise other options for financial 
support. 



"If It were 
something 
like the 
Hac key- 
Sack team, I 
might not be 
as excited. 
But lacrosse 
has been 
attracting 
more and 
more fans." 

BRAD MEYER 




► DEION WILL FINISH THE YEAR ►ROYALS END LOSING STREAK 



ATLANTA (AP) — Deion Sanders decided Thursday 
to remain with the Atlanta Braves through the end of the 
baseball season. The Pro Bowl cornerback will miss the 
Atlanta Falcons' first six games and as many as eight if 
the Braves make the playoffs and World Series. 

"It turned out OK for us,* said Braves general 
manager John Schuemotz after meeting with Sanders's 
agent, Eugene Parker, before Atlanta's game Thursday 
night against Montreal. 

"We didn't get a long-term deal, but he's going 
to be with us for the rest of the year," he said. "He'll be 
eligible for all postseason games if we are fortunate to 
get into the playoffs and the World Series." 



ARLINGTON. Texas (AP) — George Brett had three 
singles and drove m two runs as the Kansas City 
Royals rolled to a 7-2 victory over Nolan Ryan and the 
Texas Rangers Thursday night 

Brett has 1 ,509 RBI and is tied with Mickey 
Mantle for 33rd on the all-time list. He now has 2,965 
hits and passed Sam Crawford for 1 9th place on the all- 
time list. 

Ryan (5-8) lost his fifth consecutive decision, 
allowing seven runs on seven hits in four 2-3 innings 
He walked three and struck out five It tied the most 
runs he has given up in a Texas uniform. 



CHIEFS 



The Colts are coming to town 




■ TONIGHT'S 
GAME: 

The Chiefs 
take on the 
Colts tonight. 
Klckoff Is 
at 7 p.m. 
In Arrowhead 
Stadium. 



KANSAS CITY— For every bit of 
confidence Kansas City generated for itself with 
a sound thrashing of Buffalo Monday night, 
there is a cloud of doubt for the Indianapolis 
Colts. 

The Colts come to Kansas City tonight with a 
new coach, a 1 -2 exhibition record and — worst 
of all — an injured quarterback. 

Jeff George is out for four weeks with an 
injured thumb, Colts doctors said. George says 
he will be back sooner. George also says he'll be 
ready to start the season opener, but even Coach 
Ted Marchiboda said he doesn't believe that. 

Mark Herrmann will start in George's place, 
but the Bills, faced with the prospect of having 
him backed up by Tom Tupa, finally agreed to 
terms with holdout Jack Trudeau Thursday. 

The Chiefs, meanwhile, are set after a 35-0 
pounding of the Bills. Frontline players will 
likely see litttc if any action against Indianapolis 
in the final exhibition game for both teams as 
Coach Marty Schotienheimer rests his regulars 
for the regular season opener Sept. 6. 

The game will be the last before the final 
cutdown to 47 players on Monday. 

Indianapolis then will open the regular season 
at home against Cleveland while Kansas City 
goes at San Diego. 

Herrmann started the second half of 



Indianapolis' 34-14 victory in ihc exhibition 
opener and completed 12 of 15 passes, but has 
been ineffective since. Tupa is 17 of 35 for 234 
yards and has thrown two interceptions. 

Indianapolis also lost defensive back Eugene 
Daniel in a 20-0 loss to Cincinnati on Saturday 
with a sprained ligament in his knee. It is not 
known when he will return. 

The Colts played poorly against the Bengals, 
who held the ball for about 24 minutes of the 
second half, including more than 13 minutes of 
the fourth quarter. 

Ken Clark is leading Indianapolis backs with 
88 yards on 14 carries, while Reggie Langhome 
leads receivers with 1 1 catches for 120 yards 

Kansas City is still basking in the glow of the 
defeat of Buffalo on Monday night on national 
television. The Chiefs seemed to come together 
at the end of training camp, and the 30-0 beating 
by Minnesota in the second exhibition game 
Aug. 1 5 is a distant memory. 

Dave Krieg, a Plan B signee from Seattle, is 
the No. 1 quarterback after completing nine of 
10 passes against the Bills for 160 yards. Mark 
Vlasic is the backup and the Chiefs are pleased 
with the progress of rookie Matt Blundin. 

The Chiefs are developing a logjam at 
running back after signing Christian Okoye after 
the Buffalo game. Kansas Cily has 1,000-yard 
backs in Okoye and Barry Word. 



COLUMN 



SI does K-State right 



K- State football was the subject of 
national attention three years ago. 
Prior to the 1989 campaign. Sports 
Illustrated featured K-State in an 
article titled "Futility U." The story focused 
on the Wildcats" record as the worst team in 
Division I football history. And with a 27- 
game winless streak at the time, who would 
argue? 

Strange, how things change. 
Since that time, K-State has gone from 
being laughable to being respectable. 

After halting the nation's longest losing 
streak at 30 in 1989, 
^_^_^_^^_^g_ the Cats bounced to 5-6 
^^^^_J^J in 1990. 

Last season's 7-4 

record was the 

^^ Wildcats' best in 37 

BL r . M years. K-State also 

^J enters the season with 

H seven consecutive wins 

in over non-ranked foes. 

wL/ ] Forget respectable, how 

about good? 

LT^MLi— I At weekly news 

Ml ice conferences, talk of a 

„ bowl game has 

\if A y replaced chuckles that 

■^■^■^■^ usea " ,0 occur at the 

^^^^^^^^»^™ mention of Austin 

Peay, Northern lows 

and Louisiana Tech. 

Three years have passed since Sports 
Illustrated ran that now-infamous article by 
Douglas Looncy. And this week, Looncy 
updates the country on the progress being 
made at K-State. 

A Wildcat fan will learn nothing new from 
the piece; however, much of the country will 
— and not just about the football team. 

Not only is the rags to- riches story of the 
football team noted, but mentions of Rhodes, 
Tmmon and Goldwater scholars make for an 
all-encompassing view of the University. 
Even the debate team receives a mention in 
the four-page spread that looks like it could 
be right opt of a K- State recruiting guide. 

Looncy ties the success of the football 
team and University together. This is not your 
typical sports-magazine article. 

Sports Illustrated is not the only one 




SHAM MYSBm Codegon 

Eric Gallon has been partly responsible 
for the football turnaround at K-State. 

paying attention to Wildcat football. Last 
season, Bill Snyder was named National 
Coach of the Year by ESPN, the same 
network that said in 1990 that K-State could 
never turn it around. And this spnng. K-State 
had three players drafted in the NFL, and two 
others signed as free agents 

Even the Big-Eight writers got into the act 
this season by ending a three- year trend of 
picking the Wildcats to finish in the 
conference cellar. This season's fifth-place 
pick by Ihe media is the highest since 1983. 

It seems perceptions arc starting to change. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 28, 1092 y 



CLASSES 



TELENET brings University to the people 



CoUrgun 

Ann Fommers needed college 
credit for recent ideation, but as in 
elementary teacher in Salina. she 
didn't want to commute to i 
university. 

She got the courses she needed 
without ever leaving Salina through 
the TELENET program offered by 
the Kansas Regents Network. 

"I liked TELENET, because I 
didn't have to travel out of town. I 
got university credit right here in 
Salina," Fommers said, 

TELENET, i 22-year-old 
interactive audio education 
network, serves 2,500 students each 



year. 

It offers courses from Emporia 
State University, Fort Hays State 
University and K-State. Students go 
to one of 36 locations across the 
state and receive instruction, as well 
as two-way communication through 
a speaker system and microphone. 

Nadine Jones is a secondary 
education Spanish teacher enrolled 
in TELENET to gain college credit 
for her recertification. 

"The instructors were highly 
qualified and were able to elicit 
participation from everyone around 
the state," Jones said. 

TELENET classes are offered in 
the fall, spring and summer, and 



also for one week in August as an 
early fall short session. 

Courses are from 4 to 10 p.m. 
Monday through Friday, and on 
Saturday mornings. Depending on 
the credit hours, the courses may be 
one-, two-, or three-hour classes 
meeting once a week. 

With 36 locations in Kansas, 
students and teachers have the 
flexibility of moving around. They 
can continue their TELENET 
courses from any of the locations in 
Kansas. 

"Our students are real 
appreciative of the convenience this 
provides them," said Sue White, 
program coordinator. 



"It lets them go to school," she 
said. "They may otherwise have to 
pack up and leave their homes to 
go, and this way, they don't have 
to." 

White said 75 percent of the 
students are teachers who need 
additional credits to become 
certified or recertified. 

A majority of classes are geared 
toward that. White said, although 
the students are undergraduate and 
graduates ranging from 20 to 60 
years old. 

Fifteen classes are being offered 
this fall, including education, 
reading, special education, 
statistics, English, nursing, library 



and language arts. The tuition is set 
by the Kansas Board of Regents and 
varies upon which university is 
teaching the course. There is also a 
media fee of $17 for one credit 
hour, $23 for two and S29 for three. 
The average number of students 
enrolled in a TELENET course is 
45. Monitors are at each site to 
handle technical problems, help 
with registration and collect 
assignments, papers and tests. 

K-State's building has a 
soundproof room with a television 
and VCR, allowing instructors 
flexibility for accompanying videos 
Guest speakers are frequently used 
with TELENET, because they can 



call in from their office or home. 

Another extension of the Kansas 
Regents Network is TELEbndge 
It's a teleconferencing sysiem used 
for students wanting TELENET 
who aren't near a location site, as 
well as for conference calls, 
workshops and training sessions. 

Ag Update, a monthly program 
for farmers and ranchers, has used 
TELEbridge since 1983, From 
October through March. 400 
participants call in lo get updates 
about crops, wheat and livestock. 

The Kansas Social and 
Rehabilitation Services has used 
TELEbridge for ^taff conferences 
and training since 1981. 



'1 



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Watch for the Cat Coupon Clipper 
Every Monday in the LoLLEGIAN 




MANHATTAN 
EAST HWY. 24 

776-4004 
1-800-257-4004 



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DICK 
EDWARDS 

Full Service Dealer 

Offering Sales, Service, 

Rental, Bodyshop & Parts 



Dick Edwards Ford-Lincoln Mercury 




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539-7341 



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Call: Monty Shanks 

Service Advisor 

776-4004 



FREE 

SHUTTLE SERVICE 

AVAILABLE 



Call: Vic Redding 

Service Advisor 

776-4004 



PAYMENT PLAN AVAILABLE WITH PRIOR APPROVAL 



Royal Purple 1 A A O 

lyyo 


Acacia-Sept. 8 


Phi Kappa Theta-Sept 28 


Alpha Cht Omega-Sept. 8-9 


Pi Beta Phi-Sept. 29-30 


Alpha Delta Pi-Sept. 9-10 


Pi Kappa Alpha-Sept 30 


Alpha Gamma Rho-Sept. 10-11 


Pi Kappa Phi-Sept. 30 


Alpha Kappa Alpha-Sept. 1 1 


Pi Kappa Theta-Sept 30-Oct 1 


Alpha Kappa Lambda-Sept. 1 1 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon-Oct. 1 


Alpha Phi Alpha-Sept. 1 1 


Sigma Chi-Oct 1 


Alpha Tau Omega-Sept. 14 


Sigma Gamma Rho-Oct 1-2 


Alpha Xi Dclta-Scpt. 14-1$ 


Sigma Kappa-Oct 5-6 


Beta Sigma Psi-Sept. 1 5 


Sigma Nu-Oct. 6 


BetaTheta Pi-Sept 15-16 


Sigma Phi Epsilon-Oct 6 


Chi Omega- Sept. 16-17 


Sigma Sigma Sigma-Oct 7-8 


Delta Delta Delta- Sept. 17-18 


Tau Kappa Epsilon-Oct 8 


Delta Sigma Phi-Sept. 18 


ThetaXi-Oct.8 


Delta Sigma Theta-Sept. 18 


Triangle-Oct. 9 


Delta Tau Deb-Sept. 21 


Zeta Phi Beta-Oct 9 


Delta Upsilon-Sept. 21 


Boyd-Oct 9 


FarmHouse-Sept. 21 


Clovia-Oct 12 


Gamma Phi Beta-Sept. 21-22 


Edwards-Oct 12 


Kappa Alpha Psi-Sept. 22 


Ford-Oct 12 


Kappa Alpha Theta-Sept. 22-23 


Goodnow-Oct 13 


Kappa Delta-Sept. 23-24 


Haymakcr-Oct. 13 


Kappa Kappa Gamma- Sept. 24-25 


Marlatt-Oct 13 


Kappa Sigma- Sept. 25 


Moore-Oct 14 


Lambda Chi Alpha-Sept. 25 


Putnam-Oct. 14 


Omega Psi Phi-Sept. 28 


Smith-Oct. 15 


Phi Beta Sigma-Scpt. 28 


Smurthwaite-Oct. 15 


Phi Delta Theta-Sept, 28 


Van Zilc-Oct 15 


Phi Gamma Delta-Sept. 29 


West-Oct 15 


Phi Kappa Tau-Sept. 29 


OffCampus-Oct 16-30 


Picture yourself in the 1993 


Royal Purple yearbook. 


Photos will be taken from 8:30 


If you are a greek member, but 


a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. 


live in a residence hall or off 


in the K-State Union Room 209. 


campus, please have your photo 




taken with your fraternity or so- 




rority. 




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Training in the area. personal safety. 

• Professional instructors who • Flexible hours to fly at 

meet all FAA standards your convenience 

"Learn To Fly" Special J$_ 

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for an introductory flight with this coupon. 



Kansas Air Center 

Manhattan Municipal Airport 

Main Terminal 

Phone 776-1991 



a» 



Your Q & A about 



Q. How do I submit a 
news item? 

A. The Collegian welcomes any 
news tip, story or information about 
any special event. Call us at 532-6556. 
If there's time, give us a news release 
with your name, phone number and 
address. Include the who, what, 
when, where, why and how about 
your event. We don't run all releases, 
but we do publish newsworthy 
information for our student 
readership. 

Q. Whom can I talk to 
if I believe a story 
has an error? 

A, The Collegian editor is the person 
to whom you should direct questions 
and complaints about stones. Call 
532-6556. Please leave a message with 
Student Publications if editor is not 
available. 

Q. How do I submit a 
letter to the editor? 

A. The Collegian welcomes all views 
about current issues. Letters should 
be signed, with the writer's name, 
address, phone number and ID for 
verification purposes. Letters are 
edited for space, punctuation and 
grammar, but not for content. 



Q. How do 1 place a 
classified ad? 

A. Stop by Kedzie 103, just east of 
the K-State Union. You can sell your 
unwanted items and buy the things 
you want in the Collegian classifieds. 
We take classified ads from 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. weekdays. 

Q. How do 1 place a 
display ad? 

A. Come to Kedzie lis, and one of 
our advertising representatives will 
be glad to work with you on ad 
campaigns or budgets. Call 532-6560 
for more information. 



Names and numbers to call: 




Samantha Branson 




Editor in chief 


6556 


Annette Spreer 




Advertising manager 


6560 


Ron Johnson 




Director/news adviser 


6555 


Gloria Freeland 




Associate director/advertising adviser 6555 


Linda Ptintney 




Assistant director/yearbook adviser 


6555 


Jackie Harmon 




Ad billing/special events 


6555 


Patricia Hudgins 




Classified advertising manager 


6555 


Wanda Hay rue 




Advertising production coordinator 


6555 


Ann Foster 




Bookkeeping/personnel manager 


6555 



K \\s\s SI Air 



OLLEGIAN 



, 5 J2-6555 • Kedzie li' > i fust o.i^t of the K-st.iU 1 I nionl 



8 




N FOCUS 



AUG 



, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



A blue team 

member use* a 

camouflaged 

structure to hide 

behind while firing 

paintballs upon hia 

enemy. Every 

weekend, many 

people In the 

Manhattan ares 

engage In palntball 

warfare 




PAIN1 
WARS 




A member Of the red team hides In soma tall weeds while taking aim and firing upon a member of the blue team during a recent battle at Krazy Krlss Palntball Course. 

Paintball fun and safe for all 



The object of the game is shoot or be 
snot. 

It's you and the rest of your team 
trying to capture a flag without being 
shot or surrendering to the enemy. 

The enemies are after that flag as 
they avoid pellets of paints propelled at 
them at 300 feet per second. 

Each Sunday, soldiers 
from Fort Riley and civilians 
gather 13 miles west 
Manhattan for a game called 
paintball. 

"It's one of the most 
exciting feelings anyone 
could get," said Brian 
Shaffer, junior in mechanical 
engineering 

"It's a game of personal 
survival and stamina. It is a 
mix of cross-country running 
and chess." 

Shaffer has been playing 
paintball for five years and is 
a regular on a field west of 
Manhattan. 

"It's the only sport I know 
that you can shoot your buddy and have 
a drink with him afterward," said Kris 
Backman. owner of Krazy Kris's 
Paintball Course. 

"I have been at this for two years," 
Backman said. "Sometimes, the 
numbers are low, and other times, we 
get as many as 70 people. 

Doctors and lawyers were the first to 
play the game to relieve stress. Today, a 
variety of people participate in paintball 
tournaments around the country. 

"The females are very good," 
Backnfan said. Their identity is hidden, 
but you can tell, since we ask them to 



have some breast protection. 

"We have a handicapped man that is 
struck with polio," he said. "A couple of 
times, be has captured the flag." 

The paintball guns are carbon 
dioxide powered and receive constant 
air. 

There are two types of guns — the 




The first battle's casualties are shown by whet I* 
left of en exploded paintball. Eye and face protection 
must be worn at all times during a battle. 

pump and the semiautomatic. 

And there are some types of 
paintball guns banned on the field. 

"Some people own their guns," 
Backman said," but I suggest a person 
go out there and try out the gun before 
they buy one." 

Prices for the guns range from $80 to 
$600. Semis are more expensive. 

Paintballs are about the size of a 
nickel. 

If the paint, which is waterbased and 
biodegradable, leaves a mark on a 
participant or the gun, the player is 
eliminated, 



"If it wasn't environmentally safe, 
paintball would never occur." Backman 
said 

Players buy 100 balls at a time from 
Backman at a cost of $6 per 100 balls. 

Backman said that people can get 
bruised when the paintballs hit them, 
but not that often. 

"The only injuries come from 
people running and tripping over 
themselves," Backman said. 

"There is no body contact. We 
don't want people jumping and 
running around. We ask them to 
play safety and honestly at all 
times." 

Safety is important on the 
field, Backman said. Goggles, 
which are approved before the 
game, must be worn by everyone. 
Players under the age of 16 must 
have a parent's signature to play, 
and players wear a facemask. 

Players must have a barrel plug 

in place on all guns when in the 

neutral rone or command post 

area, and all guns are checked 

before every game to make sure the 

guns shoot the 300 feet per second rule, 

"Paintball is safer than golf," 

Backman said. "The manufactory and 

we want to make sure everyone is safe 

when they play. 

"People go out there for the 
excitement, while the beginner is 
curious," he said. The beginners worry 
about being hit. They are usually the 
first ones to get hit. But once they get 
hit, they want more. 

"You don't have to be a good shot or 
the greatest athlete. You just have to 
shoot the gun." 





ABOVE: Kris Backman 
explains the guidelines 
of playing palntball on 

his course. 

LEFT: Two red teem 

members race toward the 

flag In the middle of the 

battlefield. 



PHOTOS BY 
SHANE KEYSER 

STORY RY 
BRIAN ANDERSON 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 









J 



I'. 



ENTERTAINMENT 



August 28, 1992 A 



MOVIE REVIEW 



'Thunderheart' intense success 




AMDY WOOOWAAD 



Coltefian 

Somewhere between "Dances 
With Wolves," "Lethal Weapon III" 
and "Three Amigos" lies 
'Thunderheart," the film showing 
this weekend at the K- State Union. 

"Thunderheart" is the story of 
FBI agent Ray Lcvoi (Val Kilmer) 
investigating a murder on the Bear 
Creek Indian Reservation in the 
South Dakota Badlands, which was 
filmed on location. Levoi is sent 
because he is pan Sioux, and along 
the way he discovers the culture 
and pride that accompany his 
heritage. 

Kilmer delivers a solid 
performance as Levoi. displaying 
emotions from being part of the 
world of the conqueror (the U.S. 
government) to realizing his 
integral role in the world of the 
conquered (the Sioux). 

The film delves into deeper 
levels, with corruption, graft and 
federal cover-ups coming into play. 

All the time Levoi is seeking the 
murderer, he is also finding out 
more about his background. He 
eventually Finds out his blood can 
be traced back to a warrior called 



Thunderheart who was brutally 
murdered at the Battle of Wounded 
Knee. 

Sam Shepard stars as FBI agent 
Frank Coutelle. and Graham Greene 



from "Dances With Wolves" plays 
reservation police officer Walter 
Crow Horse. 

What the story lacks in intensity 
at times could have been 



supplemented by "Dances With 
Wolves"-ish cinematography, but 
director Michael A pied did not take 

■ See THUNDERHEART page 14 



LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR 


► FRIDAY, AUGUST 28 


► SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 


THE BARNBURNERS - Hibachi Hut 


SUBMYTION — Boulevards 11th Street Bar 


Reggae, blues and soul band 


Rock band 


8:30 p.m. 


10 p.m. 


Cost is $2. 


Cost is $3 for those 2 1 and over, and $4 for 


BITTER SINATRA — Wareham Opera House 


those under 21. 


Alternative band 


THE GOOD OL' BOYS — Silverado Saloon 


10 p.m. 


Country and Southern rock band 


Cost is $3 for those 2 1 and older, and $5 for 


9:30 p.m. 


those under 2 1 . 


Cost is $2 for those 21 and older, and $5 for 


SUBMYTION — Boulevards 11th Street Bar 


those under 21. 


Rock band 

10 p.m. 

Cost is $3 for those 2 1 and over, and $4 for 




■ 


those under 21. 




THE GOOD 01/ BOYS - Silverado Saloon 




Country and Southern rock band 


* 


9:30 p.m. 




Cost is $2 for those 2 1 and older, and $5 for 


, 


those under 21. 





Mini Lunch Buffet 



"All You Can Eat" 

$4.95 per person 
_1_ 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. 



Open 7 Day? 



Mini Buffet Features Daily Soup, Egg Roll Cnspon Wonioo, Crab 
Ragoon, Fried Rice & Fortune Cookie 



Beef/Broccoli 

Almond Chicken 



Vegetable Shrimp 
Yu Shiang Beef 



Tuetdav 

Moo Goo Gai Pan 

SaCbaBcef 
Shrimp Lo Mein 



Friday 

Shrimp Egg Fee Young 
Oaomi 1 «•• Cbitkm W mp 
Beef with Green Pepper 



Fire Delivery 



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Call 539-8888 



w 



Seafood Omelette 

Grata F*pjw» QMm 
Cum Beef 



Buffet 
Changes 
Weekly 



Carry Out 

and 

Delivery A variable 



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RACQUET CLUB 

3615Claflin 776-6060 

SPECIAL STUDENT MEMBERSHIP 



*indoor tennis 

*free weights 

**no initiation fee 



*sauna & Jacuzzi 
*racquetball 




B '9B, 



Qers 
Sat. Night $ 1 Wells 

Claflin & Denison (Down Under) 
FIR STB AN K CENTER 776-1515 



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AG STUDENTS and FACULTY 

WATERMELON FEED 

and 

AG CLUB ACTIVITIES FAIR 

South lawn f^££U§V Tuesday 
?:--±*9!a< -Tift* 

Of 

Waters Hall 




y& Sept, 1 



TlSrSSW 6:15 
*Weber Arena in case of rain. 
Sponsored by the Ag Student Council & Alpha Zeta 
(All departmental clubs will be represented) 



B 



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^OURMo*^ 




SHOP WITH YOUR 
"WELCOME TO MANHATTAN" 

COUPON BOOK!!! 



a 




With a Mexican Accent 



1 



The Bible knows nothing 
of solitary religion. 
John Wesley 




College Heights Baptist 
Church is a loving family 
united by the joy of serving 
Jesus Christ. This Sunday 
evening at 6:00 college 
students are invited to a free 
meal, followed by our after- 
dinner theater production - 
"Introduction to K -State 
101." Come join in the fun. 



776-5577 



1800 Claflin Rd. 
RrstBank Center 



776-5577 



PIZZA SHUTTLE 

"NO COUPON SPECIALS" 



Prim* Time % 
Special M 
3 - 10 in. Pizzas 


m Everyday 
m Two-Fers 

2 - 10 in. Pizzas 


1 -Topping ■ 
4 - Cokes M 
$10.50 M 


B 2 • Toppings 
m 2 - Cokes 
% $8.50 



Fast Delivery...Anywhere in Manhattan 




lAAAAAAAAAi 



Shrimp Picado 



TTTTfTTrrrfTTTTTfTTTfTTTfTT 

If you love shrimp and you love Mexican, this is your dish. 

We saute tender shrimp with green peppers and onions, then 

bake diem in a special butter sauce with garlic and Jack 

cheese. We top it off with tomatoes and chives and 

serve it with warm tortillas. Come in and give it a try. 

You'll see we put the accent on taste. 

Carlos (^Kelly's 



MEXICAN CAFE 



In the Manhattan Town Center 

5374688 



Stay Cool- 
Get in Shape with 
Rec Services!! 





(^ Aqua Fitness^) 



Place: Natatorium 
M,W, Noon- 12:45 
M,T. TH. 7:30 
Begins Mon. Aug 24 



(Aerobic Exercis^ 



Place: Rec Complex 
M-F 6:30 a.m. 
MP 11:45 am. 
M-THURS 4:20 p.m. 
M-PRI 5:30 p.m. 
Begins Mon. Aug 24 



For info, call: 532-6980 

•No pre registration required. Participation free with a 

validated student 10. 



Drive A Little and SAVE! 



• Home Stereos 

• Car Stereos & Installation 

■ 

• Car Alarms 

• Radar Detectors 

• Televisions 

• Video Recorders 

• Camcorders 



YAMAHA* BostonAcoustja 
CARVER VwMS*qc*> 



JVC 



KENWOOD 



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20 Minutes West! 



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1-762-4447 

UDIO 
JUNCTION, INC. 




630 Grant Ave 
Junction City 



MON FR) tO-7 
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«|Q August 28, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



f 









H 



MARCHING TO A NEW BEAT 




MAMAMT CUUWURCoHegar 

K -State Marching Band members stand et attention during practice Thursday afternoon as Jim Sharp (right), assistant band director, shows 
Ben Rohrer , Interim band director, how some of the marchers are stepping out of place. 



Interim band director sets goals 

to increase hype, get crowd more involved 



■Y THK COUWUW STAfT 

The K -Stale Marching Band lost 
its leader of nine years when Stan 
Finck, director of bands, retired 
effective June 1. 

Brad Bone, former band director 
at Wichita State University, was 
hired as the new band director but 
asked to be released from his 
contract because of health reasons. 

Assistant band director Ben 
Rohrer was selected to lake the 
position on an interim basis for the 
1992-93 school year. 

Having been Finck's assistant 
director of bands for the last four 
years, Rohrer is familiar with the 
band and the staff. He filled in for 
Finck during his illness last year. 

"1 feel like it's my second year." 
Rohrer said. 

Band member Jon Thummel, 
graduate student in public 
administration, said the change 
from Finck to Rohrer was not 
difficult for members of the band to 
make. 

"Mr. Rohrer handled most of the 
details last year. It wasn't that big 
of a deal," he said. 

Rohrer has plans to make the 
band more exciting and more 
crowd- pleasing this year. 

"We're going to implement a 



Big- 10 type of band, using a high- 
step marching style. We want to 
increase hype and get the crowd 
more involved," Rohrer said. 

Rohrer attributes the band's 
success to his staff. Assistants Jim 
Strain and Jim Sharp are two of the 
best in the business. Rohrer said, 
and John Long and Sherri Senter 
are valuable graduate assistants. 

"They work very hard. The 
delegation process works very 
well." said Rohrer. 

Although comfortable with his 
interim position, Rohrer said he 
misses Finck's leadership. 

"I'll be consulting him a lot 
throughout the year. He's one of the 
best." 

Highlights of the 1992 band 
include Band Day Sept. 19, an 
appearance Sept. 28 in Kansas City 
when the Chiefs play the Raiders, 
and an Oct. 10 appearance in 
Lawrence when K- State plays KU. 

Rohrer served as band director at 
Cloud County Community College 
in Concordia before coming to K- 
State. That sparked his interest in 
teaching band on a collegiate level, 
he said. 

"That got me started thinking of 
teaching higher education. College 
level musicians attain a higher level 
of musicianship," he said. 




Rohrer directs the band from atop a ladder Thursday afternoon. 
rW't'i't'v-i'VU'i'Wi'v't'H'iH-i-V-l'V-V-VVViVtt-i'Vi-V* 



Little Sister Prelim Party 

Get Involved With a 

Fraternity & Make Friends 

Cookout and Games 

Thursday Aug. 28 & Sept, 4, 5:30 p.m. 

Beta Sigma Psi 

1200 Centennial 



. frtfti/st:x 



An SPOwt Daily 

B.fore 6 PM 

13 SO 



Sludtnli and 

Military *.|h ID 

1 4 50 



SETHCHILDSS*' 



7f»-St(B 



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TMafaikj bHIN 
T«u. »>» III ■ »JB 

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WESTLOOP CINEMA 6 "SEVSS 



C I ' I l» dMrtM liM tf.lt 

fair/ m»M» 

X.J I— 1 1a.m. 

fain * 7 m 
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CAMPUS "H* 



fjjjg 



NESPOR 

Wines & Spirits 

•Specializing in domestic and imported wines 

• Large selection of cordials and liquors 

• Special orders welcomed for parties and weddings 

• Case discounts 

1338 Westioop Place 

Westloop Shopping Center 

539-9441 



Intramural Deadline 



^ 
d 



DEADLINE TODAY at 5 p.m. 

•Flag Football 
•Soccer 
•Individual Sports 




Enter at the Rec Services Office 

532-6980 




Attention Wildcats... 

When you get to Manhattan 
and find yourself needing a 
haircut, use this money 
saving coupon. 



5 



50 

(with coupon) 

Walk-ins Welcome! 




J^ 



Styling for Men. Women 539-2921 
and children. 1129 Westloop 

Mon.-Sat, 9-5:30 Shopping Center; 

Thurs. til 8 (west side) 



K-STATE DEBATE 



Former debater 
goes international 



JULIE WHITE 



Cottefian 

The K-State Debate program 
has added another fin>t to its list 
of accomplishments. 

Bill Boggs, former K-State 
debater, has been selected as one 
of two Americans to represent 
the United States on the 
Committee on International 
Discussion and Debate Tour. 

The eight-week tour, 
sponsored by the Speech 
Committee Association, a large 
national association, will cover 
five countries. 

"The British Tour, our tour. 
makes five stops. We stop in 
England, Scotland, Wales, 
Ireland and Northern Ireland." 
Boggs said. 

Boggs said the British 
participate in debate societies. 



which meet weekly, in contrast to 
the team format used in the 
United States. The two 
Americans will be guests at the 
meetings, which also feature 
debates between prominent 
politicians and world leaders. 

The duo will represent the 
United States in the World 
Student Debate Competition in 
January in London. 

While at K-State. Boggs was 
champion of the Heart of 
America tournament at the 
University of Kansas and 
champion of the Central State 
tournament in Oklahoma. 

He was a member of the 
debate team, which received 
third at nationals, and he was 
third speaker at nationals during 
his senior year. 



Wa Tata Tips. 

■ ANSA! 1TATI 

COLLEGIAN 




Urtiil 5-9 p m Sunday 

For 

Authentic 

Italian Rectpes 

Cooktd 

To Order 

This Week's Specials 

* Steak & Pasta $5.95 

* Chicken Parmigiana $5.45 

* Sherry Chicken Alfredo $5.95 
(with tettucme Pasta > $5.95 

All You Can Eat 

Spaghetti & Meatballs $3.95 

All Dinners Served With 
Tossed Salad & Breadsticks 




537-&M3 2304 Stagg Hill Rd. 
Next to Clyde's id Manhattan 




Don't miss Clyde's Sunday 

BREAKFAST BUFFET 

for a satisfying taste 

treat that won't bust your 

wallets: 

• Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits 

• Creamed Chipped Beer 

• Bisquit Gravy 

• Homefried Potatoes 

• French Toasl 

• Pancakes 
•Bacon/Sausage 

• Scrambled Eggs 

• Escaltoped Apples 

• Grilled Ham Steak 

All You Can Eat 
For Only M.95 

BuBet: 9:30 a.m « 1:00 p.m. 

Or order one of our famous gourmet 

omelets or skidel breakfasts 

537-8440 

2304 Stagg Hill Rd. 




Located across from th* 
Holtday tnn-HoUdome 




Auditions 
Fall H )2 



OPliN TO ALL K-STATE STUDENTS 

Hp t *rrnnrt t* )w j ki w i f> r inn 
t rt+t timtt M t k * rrrfnnnmce .» Ftntocttm «w* 

Tuesday, September 1 5:30-7 p.m. 
304 Ahearu Gym 



# 



BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL! 



CHOOSE 



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J RENT 2 MOVIES 

i and receive 

FROM .. q NE SINGLE DI p 

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FREE 

EXPIRES: Sept. 30, 1992 

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•LIMIT ONE COUPON PER CUSTOMER! 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 28, 1992 



11 



Fleas best treated by 
cleaning environment 



I 

\ 

i 







CAMPUS 



K-State gets 3-year Boys State contract 



amumanra 

The Boys State coordinating 
committee recently signed a three- 
year commitment to have its annual 
conference on the K -State campus, 

K-Stale was host to Boys Slate 
for the first time in June, because of 
a scheduling conflict at the 
University of Kansas, where the 
conference has been for 27 years, 
said Scott Johnson, assistant 
professor of animal sciences and 
industry. 

Johnson has been involved in 
Boys State since [971, when be was 

MILITARY 



a delegate to the conference for 
selected high school seniors In 
1992, he served as Boys State 
adviser and helped in selecting the 
host school. 

"K- State did a fantastic job of 
providing maintenance, serving 
meals and presenting services that 
were not part of the conference 
costs," Johnson s;iul. 

In addition, he said, K-Slate's 
bid for Boys State was less 
expensive than KU's proposal. 

"Previously, there have been 
problems at KU with facilities arid 
inflexible scheduling," he said. "K 



State really rolled out the red 
carpet, and KU jerked it out from 
under us a few years ago," Johnson 
v,ml 

Boys State gives the K -State a 
chance to expose 700 upcoming 
high school seniors to the campus 
and let them experience university 
life, said Robert Burgess, assistant 
director of housing. It also gives the 
University the opportunity to recruit 
future students, he said. 

"We provided the housing and 
facilities for the conference," 
Burgess said. "The students had 
meetings in the residence halls and 



dining centers and aUo utilized 
McCain Auditorium. All Faiths 
Chapel and the Chester 1-1. Peters 
Recreation Complex." 

Participants of Boys Slate, which 
is sponsored by the American 
Legion, act as citizens ol a fictitious 
state and are divided into mock 
county and city governments. The 
students serve on committees and 
experience legislative meetings. 

"Boys State gives us a chance to 
develop leaders, which benefits the 
state of Kansas as well as K-State,** 
Burgess said. 



Armed forces recruiting becoming selective 



Numbers remain 

steady as quality, 

standards increase 



A look at fleas up close. 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

from developing into adults. 

Application is not a one-time 
event, Dryden said, because 
currently no insecticides will kill 
the pupa stage. 

"Short of a flame thrower, 
you're not going to kill them," he 
said. 

Dryden said a second treatment 
two to three weeks after the first 
will significantly eliminate fleas in 
the environment 

Treatment should be applied to 
the animal as well. Dipping and 
shampooing are popular methods 



DAVID MAYCS Coifcffan 



with dogs, but cats are more 
difficult, he said, 

"You should try to do whatever 
your cat will allow you io do to it." 
Dry den said. 

A new treatment is in the form 
of a mousse. Cats are more willing 
to be treated in this manner, he said. 

However, pet owners need to 
take caution and not overmedicate 
the animal. 

"Especially with cats, you need 
to follow all the label directions and 
never apply the product in any way 
other than directed," Dryden said. 



MARTI GIAC 

Colic gun 

The search for a few good men 
and women is getting tougher as the 
military reduces total si/c. 
Recruiters have higher standards for 
today's prospective members. 

"The Army still has a need to 
recruit individuals." said Staff Sgt. 
Duane Jackson, Army recruiting 
station manager in Manhattan "It's 
the mid-career people that are 
leaving, not the privates," 

Al the Navy recruiting office, 
business is not as easy as it was a 
year ago. 

"We are recruiting about the 
same numbers. but the 
qualifications are going up," Petty 
Officer 1st Class Chuck Schmil* 
said. 

The local Air Force recruiter has 
seen goals of two or three contracts 
a month increased to four or five a 
month. 

"We're looking for every thine in 
the Air Force." said Staff Sgt. 
Randy Ross. Air Force recruiter. 
"We ha*e opportunities for high- 
school grads. people with some 
college and college gnuK 

"The cutbacks aren't affecting 
who and how many we're 
recruiting," Ross said. "We still 
have to fill from the bottom up. The 
doors arc not shut." 

The Marines are looking for 
recruits who are even more 
qualified than those of just a few 
years ago. 

"The Marine Corps has again 
raised its qualification standards for 






-> .<>*" ■ ■" 



"The 
cutbacks 
aren't 
affecting 
who and 
how many 
we're 
recruiting." 

SGT. RANDY RUSS 



enlistment," said Sgt. Charlotte 
Billings, U.S. Marine Corps public 
relations representative. "And while 
the Marine Corps is still the 
country's rapid-deployment 
strikeforce, today's brand of high 
tech warfare demands sharper, more 
intelligent troops, even for the grunt 
on the ground. 

"The present Marine Corps 
advertising 
campaign 
reflects the 
new 
standard," 
Billings 
*.nd. "The 
emphasis i«. 
on In- 

telligence." 

A I I 
armed 
services are 
looking for 
high -school 
graduates and people with some 
college or technical training, 
recruiters saitf 

"Officer programs for the 
college graduates are looking for 
engineers. nurses. doctors; 
everybody except for pilots," R>>^ 
said. "The best bet to get into pilot 
training is to graduate from the Air 
Force Academy." 

Trained and educated recruits 
continue to have advantages in 
entering the .inned semces 

"The Army is offering a lot of 
incentives to people with some 
college in the form of college loan 
repayments and even cash bonuses 
tor enlistment." Jackson said. 

"Specially jobs like medically 
trained people and mechanic* ire 
really what we're looking for," 
IftCksoO said. "We're looking for 



people with some training and 
background." 

Some recruiters are finding 
recruiting challenging since the end 
of the gulf war and the fall of the 
Berlin Wall. 

"We go into a high school to 
recruit, and a lot of the kids think 
that we don't need anybody any 
more." Schmitz said. "Hey, we're 
still recruiting." 

Competition for the smaller 
numbers of Navy openings is 
tougher. 

"VV i in average scores of only 38 
and recent requirements of a score 
of ?0 on the Armed Forces 
Qualification Test, it's hard to fill 
those openings," Schmit2 said. 

"We have people that get 30s on 



the tests," Schmitz said "We've 
had somebody get as low as a 7, 
and that pet son was a high- school 
graduate." 

The standards for admission to 
sill armed services are hiclwr than in 
past years, but that docMi't mean 
the military is out of the recruiting 
business 

"I have nine openings in the 
Army for active duty and reserves 
this month. I'm rcciuitim*, * Jackson 
said. 

The recruiting ofliccs for the 
Army. Air Force. Marines and 
Navy are located near Alco on 
Anderson Avenue and Seth Childs 
Road. 



PAT M. DREILING D.D.S. M.S., P. A. 

Practice limited to Orthodontics 

TRANSFERS WELCOME 

537-0136 



Manhattan Med. Center 

1 133 College Ave. Building D 



members American 
Association of Orthodontics 



"Furnish Your Apartment I Dorm" 
GARAGE SALE!! 

Furniture ■ Kitchen, Batmoom Supplies ■ Draperies/ Blinds - 

Photography Equipment Bedding - Clothes(l) • TVs Files • 

Books - Dotm Buntt Frame • Lamps - Exetcise Equipment Juke 

Box - Pictutes - Computer • Lawn Chairs - Dishware • Camping 

Geai - TREASURES! 

BASEMENT OF HARRVS UPTOWN (WAREHAM HOTEL) 
SATURDAY 7-2 SUNDAY 9- 1 



Pig's 

Eye 

Beer 

$1 




K-ROCK 
LIVE 

REMOTE 



BLEACHERS 

mnui ■ am » guar 
1st Anniversary 

Party On! 



Friday 28 



<tftf* 



^ll\ 



ay 

16 oz. Beer in Souvenir Cun $1 

16 oz. Wells in Souvenir Cup $1 

Macho Narhus, Santa Fe Chicken or Smothered Hurrito 

$3.49 

Prizes Galore!!! 

Video Machine. CI) Player. Pool Cue. Cooler*, Neon Sinn. Mirrors, 

XM'FM Sony Ualkman. Nylon Jacket. Dart*, Swral*hirt», 75 T- 

Sliirt*. CD*. Pitia*. Movie Pauses, Movie Rentals, I Lit-. Haircuts, 

Tan«, Yogurt, Baseball Card*. 

List Continuing to grow! 

523 S. 17th 337 1484 

10 blocks south of K-State Union 



UPC 

TIL THE COWS 




Truck Slop 

Love 

3: 00-3: 40pm 




WELCOME BACK 

r CONCERT v * 
AUGUST 29, 3PM-8PM \ 
MEMORIAL STADIUM y 
n 4 BANDS - 4 BUCKS!! 




Sept. 2 & 3 at 7 & 9:30pm 
FORUM HALL 



tC-Stma Union 

upc 



Info Meeting ; Sept. 3 at 7pm 
Union Rm. 209 

Sign- up begin s; Sept. 4 at 8am 
UPC Office - Union 3rd Floor 

gff| K-SWUn«m 
uSiWa^a an 



Aug. 29 & 30 at 7 & 9:30pm 
Aug. 31 at 7pm 
FORUM HALL 



•f O August 28, 1992 



E 



SSENTIALS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



DOUBLE BARRELED 



DARYL BLASI 



CROSSWORD 






You just used 
me -for pollincvtfon 



i 
\ 



j 




CALVIN AND HOBBES 



BI11WTFJISON 



N 




THE STKEH6TH TO CHANGE 
WHAT I CAN, THE INABILITY 
TO ACCEPT WHAT I CAHt, 
AND THE INCAPfccm TO 
TEU.THE tHFFEftEHCE 



ra 








*M SHOULD LEAD AH 
INTERESTING LIFE 




ACROSS 
1 Likely 
4 Export 
7Caan or 
Coco 

12 "Cock a 
doodlt- 
— P 

13 Poaco. in 
artaert 
Roma 

14 Spry 

15 Model 
Carol 

16 Bewilder- 
ing 

18 Sales 
pitch? 

19 One's 
perfor- 
mances ? 

20 Sepulchral 
structure 

22 Baptist's 
bench 

23 Gave a 
prompt 

27 Golfer 
Alcott 

29 Hose 
attach- 
ment 

31 Eighth 
Greek 
letter 

34 Gets a 

35 Mensa 
requisite 

37 Discord 

38 Lip 



JIM'S JOURNAL 



JIM DIKKERS 



«*•*.» ftiMtelCrtjt of 

•«vte 1*t f l—r- 




Mr. fettrjt* ht«jr*J 
it fe»M «|tW tw»» 



X loetat* «tkV, Awd fkt *«i* 



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»#e,»W *»«♦« 






/"■■ 



THE STRIP 



DAVID SWEARING EN 




ihz 



yfS 



WHERE P0E5 
KIM 



39 Employ- 
ment 

41 Marine 
mop 

45 Instru- 
ment "on 
my knee" 

47 Past 

48 Suc- 
ceeded 

52 Wad 

53 Foreigner 

54 Neighbor 
of Man. 

55 Sphere 

56 Grew 

57 — volente 

58 Aye 
canceler 

DOWN 

1 Make fit 

2 Reason 
for the 
Salt 
vaccine 



3 Reserva- 
tion 
emblem 

4 'Planet of 
the— ■ 

5 Awning 

6 Philip 
Nolan's 
fate 

7 Predica- 
ments 

8 Khan 
address 

9 Cambridge 
sen. 

10 New 
Haven 
collegian 

11 Wine 
designa- 
tion 

1 7 Grad garb 
21 Clean up 
23 Despotic 
ones 





Solution time: 


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Yesterday's answer 8-28 



EUGENE SHEFFER 



24 Terror- 
ist's 
weapon 

25 Right 
angle 

26 — 
Moines 

28 Avril 
follower 

30 'Death — 
Sales- 
man" 

31 Article in 
Time? 

32 Secreted 

33 Future 
flamingo 

36 Type- 
setters 
spacer 

37 Insipid 
40 Hair net 

42 Cart 

43 Market- 4 I VITiriilli 1-90CM54-6873' 99c per rranute. touch 
place of I lone I rotary phones { 1 8* only ) A Krtg Features service, NYC 

y° re 8-28 CRYPTOQUIP 

44 uop, in 

mfC*" KRJDRMRHZ'H nrbdvbruma 

46Sgt. 

Snorkels S IH KUBC IMNBC, 

dog 

48 Feline 
toot 

49 Chicken- T rj B | D J M N . 

lung link Yesterday's Cryptoquip: OWNER OF FRANK- 

5i l,w FURTER STAND DID NOT USUALLY RELISH HIS 

pagV WORK, 
word Today's Cryptoquip clue: N equals G 




C T j ll %M PC ft^ ^or answers to today's crossword. 



VJB TU SIH HZBRMNRMN 




ONE DAY TO LIVE 




DAV 3 — "Someone comes a 
knockin"' 

Delilah and Sputnik are silting in 
Sputnik's apartment watching a Redskin's 
football game and thinking of how they 
could get Neopolitan to accept her, when 
there is a knock at the door. Instinctively, 
they both run and hide — trying to pretend 
that they aren't home. 

"Delilah?" echoes a faint voice from 
beind the door. 

"Wolfgang?" screams Delilah as she 
sprints for the door. 

"Who is HE?" shouts Sputnik as he 



quickly notices that the Redskins have a 
first down on the 49ers' 12-yard line. 

"Oh, he is just my father's cousin's 
coach's son's favorite babysitter's dentist's 
second son's best friend, We met at the 
Yugo dealership in Munich about three 
years ago. 

Should Sputnik believe her? Should he 
allow her to open the door, and let her 
friend in? Just who is this friend, and what 
does he want? Will the Redskins run an 
off-tackle play, or try to get a touchdown 
through the air? Sorry, folks, but you have 
to wait until Monday's Collegian for the 
answers. 




LASSIFIEDS 



KAKSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






DAY 20 words or less — 
each word over 20 



DAYS 2° words or less — 
each word over 20 

DAYS 20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

DAYS 20 "ords o f 'ess — 
each word over 20 

DAYS 20 words of ,ess 
each word over 20 
{consecutive day 



$5 

— $.20 per word 

$6,25 

— $.25 per word 

— $7.25 

— $.30 per word 

$8 

— $.35 per word 

$8.50 

— $.40 per word 
•rate) 



TO MY OfAOUeS CAHCfULATlOKS 

m«MM Cts osl n i J to* mutt tot also*) by » reu est your tarn bstere you; *d 

I account noMlr*%btfer«tMiM»reu*M fcss Basest, twwlntfcind you lor flts 

youros'toruTL fl issl M olspM^OO* is ffl jW n j **• * • 

C^sfjedr^NesOsrCardorVhaars rmettnpima"bir4pjn,hn»ert*a, twnwsiesf « bete* noon t?» day 

*ooipl»4.11»N it tttdsMvfoi cruras dsys prior to in* oast yeutseM pwr id in i* Is » b* oubUabsd 

toMMunwl Ascks. town CflsWaatCTMea'Pi 

mm^W*K+«« pfraroUMDADS TSSSSSS^^mm 

"L, rir T totsonlottoyou.Mnintoundido cstualtotccapirsoftomMsfyonry 

IfaUaXMES Iwirewoayitrw of crura*. ftes%fsm«f«Ra*tesrtfcHv 

For woctscteros, ••louts sHaoaaasstsaeHsie>eaaoitoBiBoeaait^HMB«HBlB«t«HB^lt^H 
istoMyswidtocstoMte 



Call 532-6555 to place your classified. 



GET THE WORD OUT 

PUCE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IH KEDZIE 103 










PARKING 

OF THE 



932-6555 

MX 

532-7309 



OR WRITE 



K-Wato l 
KesUtHsfl103 



OFFICE HOURS 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 
8 a.m. -5 p.m. 




BULLETIN 
BOARD 




ADVANCED FLIGHT 

Training. Multi-engine, 



. txmmwoai, 
ATP. CFI ratings 
Private and instrument 
ground school. 

Hugh Irvinat 539-3178 
evening*. 

ATTENTION LADIES I Take 
time to schedule a 
free Mary Kay fecial! 
Mary Kay ia a top- 
line skin cere program 
Invite soma friends 
It's double the funll Call 
Karla Mstson at 
539-4342. 

COME FLY with us, K-Statt 
Flying Club has 
five airplanes. For best 
prices call Sem 
Knipp, 539-6193 after 
530p.m. 

NEEDED: THE senior in 
Architecture who 
bakes and decorates 
cakoe. Please coll 
for an order 567-5190 
days 494-8460 



evenings and weekend 
Tom. 

NEW INTERNATIONAL 
Youth Hostel open 
tng between Wichita/ 
Junction City. 

$7.50 nighl. Stone 
Pr airie Inn, Marion, 
KS 68861. Reservation* 
required. 
0161382-2746 

POSTERS AT 20 percent oft. 
Last day of 

sale ia Saturday. All 
posters even spe 
del order. Nagel silk 
screens and over- 
sized poster* are 20 
percent off. Inex- 
pensive mounting and 
framing available 
Strecker Gallery. 332 
PoyrtM 10- B. 
Tuesday- Saturday. 

SHYNESS WORKSHOP, t* 
shyness inhibiting 
you? Five- cession 



workshop will teach 
skills of overcoming 
shyness. Mondays 
3:30- 5pm. beginning 
September 14. Fee: 
Si 0. Call University 
Counseling Service* at 
532-6927 lo reserve a 
place. 

SMART ONE day dietl Rid 
15 to 20 pounds 

in 30 quick days F njoy 
summer! 'Free 

Sample*- 18001395-3978 



mm 




FOUND FERRET. Call 537- 
612S. Mike. Scolt 
or Jeff. 




We require a form of 
picture ID (KSU ot 



SBM 29. 6' 179 pound*, 
would like to meet a 
nice lady, 23 to 37 for 
romance and to 
gstherne**. Reply 
Collegian Sox 1, 

WsLLETHEWedcal- Thank* 
for making 

one of my little boy's 
dreams come true. 
You are a hero in little 



childrens eyes, 

when there aren't many 
heroes left. 

Thanks for taking the 
time and realizing 
how important it was to 
him! Your big- 
gest fans on Vattier 
Street. 



050T 



Ew wirttsd to 
m of tries* 
rtillY Big partlts 
wfetra *t*ry K-SMt 

Stsifjff I snows sip aftfl 
hsi a good tint* 
m9lr!m »n Mia toatt 
of tha campus.? 



; t 

Warm It Up! 

Turn up the heat at 

your next party with 

Wet'iVHUrttTbhs 

•FXEEDttivqy 

•FXEESetUp 

<ALL TODAY! 

537-1821 


5^*^^^_. 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 





QET 
THE 



OUT. 



105^" 



HOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 



bethrooms near 

campus. Central air and 
heating. «0TX 537-0428. 

AIR CONDITIONED, very 
clean one, two, 
three-bedroom units- 
Furnished or unfur- 
nished. Quiet 
surroundings lor serous 
students. Nine month 
lease available. No 
pets. 537 8389 

CLOSE TO campus very 
nice. one, two, 
three and four- 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
ireal price*. 

17-2919. 537-1866. 

NEWLY REMODELED three- 
bedroom, two 

bath, one-helf block 
from campus. No 
pet*. 776-1340. 



art 

537 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






August 28, 1992 4 O 



Collegian Classifieds 




CLOSE TO campus vary 
nice, one, two, 
three and lour* 
bedrooms. Apartment 



t and houses with 
great prices. 

537-2919, 537-1666 

EFFICIENCY FOR two. one 
block from cam- 
pus. Washer/ dryer. 
456-2240. 

FOUR -BEDROOM, TWO 
bath, central air, 
laundry, near campus. 
537-8800. 

LARGE TWO BEDROOM, 
west side location. 
Pool, central air, 
dishwasher, activities. 
Available now. $449. 
5397489. 

SPACIOUS, VERY dean two- 
three bedroom, 
two bath, air 
conditioned, laundry 
hook 

ups. Waterbeds 
eccepted. Quiet 
surround- 
ings for serious 
students. No pets. Also 
one 

and two bedroom units, 
537-8389. 

STUDIO APARTMENT, close 
to campus. 

Call after 6p.m. 
776-6724 

THE PERFECT roommate 
apartment, Nine 
month leases. Extra 
large two- bed room. 
Two private baths. 
Washer and dryer in- 
cluded. Dishwasher. 
Swimming pool. Pri- 
vate balcony. 
Immediate availability. 
Up- 

perclassmen and 
graduate students pre- 
ferred. Call 776-8641 

TWO-BEDROOM. TWO- 
three individuals. 
Nice, clean. Campus 
one and one-half 
blocks. Aggieville one 
block. Balcony, big 
bathroom and closets. 
No pets. Take over 
lease immediately. 539 
3123, leave mes- 



WANTED 

Students looking lot 

living iccommodations 

with their own 

bedroom within a 

4-bedroom town home. 

In unit amenities include: 

* DsmMS/Vr 
I Microwave) 

* Hfefwri A Drytn 
Comple* also includes: 

* Hot JiAs 

' tend Votfobill Courts 

As low as: 
Sl9>/month per person 
Will match roommates 

if necessary 
Call to; an appointment 



776-3804 




For Hurt* 




A HOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 
campus. Central air and 
heating. S600 537-0428 

AVAILABLE SEPT. 1 four 
bedroom. Located 
1715 Poynti. Two bath, 
fireplace, wash- 
er/ dryer, yard. $620 
plus utilities, lease 
plus deposit 539-3672 

TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE, 
two and one-half 
mites from Town Center 
on Highway 24. 
776-1340 




FREE ADVICE. Purchase a 
mobile home. 

We finance low 
payments; two- 
bedroom. 

$149.75 monthly. 
Countryside 539-2325. 




FEMALE- NON-SMOKING 
roommate wanted 
immediately Share 
attractive four-bed- 
room with friendly/ 
trustworthy room- 
mates. $182/ month 
one-fourth reason- 
able utilities. Call 
539-4168, leave mes- 



MALE ROOMMATE. 

graduate student, non- 
smoking to share two- 
bedroom apart- 
ments. One block to 
campus, share bath- 
room, furnished 
Washer, dryer. $175 
plus electricity. 
776-4776. 



MALE ROOMMATES 
wanted. Two- three 
rooms available. 
Brittnay Ridge estate 
Call 

Darin, 776-0589 Leave 
message. 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate to share 
two-bedroom duplex. 
Call 776-0402, 

NON-SMOKING MALE to 
be fourth person in 
two- bedroom 

rtment St 207 month 
one-fourth utilities. 
537-1610. 

ONE FEMALE roommate 
needed imme- 

diately! Non-smoker to 
share three bed 
room house with two 
other girls. Rent $110 
plus one-third utilities. 
Just behind Rama- 
da Inn We're waiting for 
your call. 776- 
3655. 

ONE NON-SMOKING female 
roommate need 
ed to share three- 
bedroom apartment 
close to campus. Please 
call 776-3421. 

ONE NON SMOKING 

female. $134 per 
month plus one -fourth 
utilities. One and 
one half blocks from 
campus. 776-2076. 

ONE- THREE non-smoking 
females. farm- 

house, barn, pasture 
for horses, cattle. 
dogs. Prefer Veterinary. 
Animal Science, 
Horticulture majors. 
Possible rent in ex- 
change for horse 
training or light cattle 
and 

horse chores. 776 1205, 
8pm- 9pm or P. 
O. Box 1211. 

OPENING FOR two male 
student roommates 
in a three bedroom, one 
and one-half 

bath apartment in a 
complex 537-7087 
or 537-2470. 

ROOMMATE WANTED for 
farmhouse six 

miles from town. Horse 
facilities $125/ 

month plus utilities. 
539-2029 

ROOMMATE WANTED to 
share three-bed- 
room, own room, $1 1 6/ 
month plus one- 
eighth utilities. 537- 
9329. 



ROOMMATE WANTED One 
block from cam- 
pus and Aggieville. 
$125/ month, one- 
fourth utilities, own 
bedroom in house 
with easy going guys, 
537-2055. 

SERIOUS NON-SMOKING 
female. Own 

room, furnished $150/ 
month plus utili- 
ties. Two blocks from 
campus. Leave 

message 539-7141. 

SERIOUS, NON -SMOKING 
female roommate 
to share a one bedroom 
apartment par- 

tially furnished. Call 
539-7586. 

THREE-BEDROOM ON 
Hi Merest with two oth 
ers, walking distance 
KSU. Laundry 

facilities, garage $235/ 
month. Leave 

message with Karen 
539-7495. 

TWO ROOMMATES needed. 
One-half block 

east of campus. 
Upperclassmen pre- 
ferred. Call 776-7794 

TWO ROOMMATES needed 
immediately. 
Four- bed room house, 
one block from 
campus, own room: 
$175 plus one-fourth 
utiklies. Travis 776-9319 
leave mes- 

sage. 



WANTED FEMALE 

roommate. Close to 
cam 

put. Call Dawn 
587-0651. 



150 



NON-SMOKING FEMALE to 
sublease two- 

bedroom apartment. 

One block from cam- 
pus. $165 plus one-third 
electric/ month. 
776-9859 




SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



205^ 



TUTORING HELP available 
for malh, physics, 
and FORTRAN 

programming. Call 
Che tan 
si 537 1539 



210 



Typma 



A 8 C Typing service. You do 
the studying, 

let me do the typing. 
Reports, charts, 
graphs, resumes and 
more. Overnight re- 
sults when necessary 
Go ahead, give 
me a call 537-9480 after 
5p.m. ask for 
Jackie. 

A FIVE minute walk from 
Aggieville. Pa- 

pers, letters $1.25 
double spaced. Same 
day slightly higher Ask 
about resumes. 
Call 776- 1534 

RECOGNIZE THIS7 We're 
Still here 1 Utilize 
my fl.S, in English/ 
Speech for papers/ 
editing, my ten years 
personnel man- 
agement for resumes. 
$1 25 double; let- 
ter quality. Call Janice 
537-2203 



235 



Chat Cm 



BABYSITTING BY teacher 
and mother in her 
home 7 to 5:30 Monday 
through Friday. 
Two years old and up. 
Call 776-2174. 

DEPENDABLE, NON 
SMOKER needed to 
care for five year old 
after kindergarten, 
and eight year old after 
school in my 
home,, located near 
Amanda Arnold. Must 
have child care 
experience and own 
Irani 

portal ion. References 
required. Hours will 
be 11:20a.m.- 5:30p.m.. 
Monday- Friday. 
Please call 537-7354 
after 5:30p.m. for 
more information. 

MATURE AND experienced 
babysitter needed 
for two great kids 
Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday 12:30- 4p.m. 
References required. 
7766486. 




WANTED: ALTERNATES for 
(doo- wool vocal 
group. Need first tenor 
with high falsetto 
and low bass. Perform 
around state, even- 
ings and weekends. 
Good pay. 776 4999, 
537-1741 




NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 20 years 
experience. Auto Craft, 
2612 Dipper Lane, 
Manhattan. Kansas. 537- 
5049. 8a. m- 

5p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 



255 K 



A LITTLE extra cash for a 
chemistry text and a 
pitcher of beer. Cash 
Pawn SiGun, Inc., 
1917 Ft Riley Boulevard. 

HEALTH AND Auto 
Insurance. Call us be- 
fore buying the 
University Health Plan. 
Mute- line Agency. 555 
Poynti Suite 

215. Tim Engle 
537-4661. 

LOSE WEIGHT. Increase 
energy 100 per- 
cent herbal capsule 
proven to burn body 
fat, boost energy, end 
take off weight nat- 
ural . Call Julie at 539- 
4698 




EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 




The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advertisements 
in the Employment 
classification. Readers 
are advised to ap- 
proach any such 
employ mem opportunity 
with reasonable caution. 
The Collegian 

urges our readers to 
contact the Bettor 
Business Bureau, SOI BE 
Jetferton, Top* 

ka, KS 66607-1 190. 
1913)233-0464. 

20 PEOPLE needed to help 
capitalize on tre- 
mendous market for 
Shaperite Products. 
Discover this unique 
100 percent herbal 
line that's sweeping 
america. Superb 
pay plan and 
professional training. 
For 

free sample and intro 
pack call: 

(800)788-67 40exl.361 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

ASSISTANT with execu- 
tive secretary 
responsibilities. Full- 
time 

Typing proficiency, 
Macintosh computer 
proficiency required. 
Apply in person 



with resume. Sager 
Dental Associates 
P.A 514 Humboldt. 

BABYSITTER NEEDED for 
two children in my 
home. Prefer live-in. 
Must have time avail- 
able from 6a.m. to 
7:45a.m. and 3p.m. to 
6pm. Monday Friday. 
Some nights and 
weekends needed 
Prefer college girl with 
rural background. Must 
be absolutely de- 
pendable! Need reliable 
transportation, ex- 
cellent driving record, 
non-smoker. Must 
enjoy children and have 
previous experi- 
ence. References 
required. Call 77601 40 
before 9pm and leave 
message. 

CHILDCARE PROVIDER/ 
teacher aide for 
weekday church 
program involving inf- 
ants through preschool - 
age children. 

Must be available 9:30 
to noon on Thurs- 
day mornings. Potential 
for additional 

hours. Childca'e 
experience and refer 
ences required. Apply 
by August 31 at 
the First United 
Methodist Church. 6th 
and Poynti 

CHILDCHILLY NANNIES east 
coast nannies. 

NY, Conn., Long Island, 
and NJ areas 
Live <n one year 
commitments. $150 and 
up per week. Immediate 
Placements In- 

terviews and 

applications call 
(8001858-2429 

CHINESE RESTAURANT, 
kitchen help. Ex- 
perience preferred, part- 
time 539-2551 

CNA STONEYBROOK 
Retirement Commun- 
ity is looking for caring 
and enthusiastic 
CNA's to work full or 
part-time, evenings 
or nights. Must have 
Kansas certifies 
lion. Apply at 2025 Little 
Kitten Ave 

776-0065 EOE 

COMPUTER SUPPORT and 
Programming po- 
sitions are available for 
K State students 
with a variety of skills 
Support Technicians 
must have good 
interpersonal skills, have 
experience with PCs 
and popular software 
packages like 

WordPerfect. Lotus, 
dBase. 

Must have a firm 
understanding of 
MSDOS, and Windows. 
and have some 
programming skills. 
Software Developers 
and Network Assistants 
must have ex- 
perience with C/C**, 
data based man- 
agement systems (SQL 
dBase, Parado-*i 
and with Novell, UNIX. 
MS-DOS. and Wind 
ows. GUI programming 
experience in X or 
Windows 3.1 is 
especially helpful 
Applica 

tions will be available/ 
accepted until 

9/1»2et211Umberger 
Hall 

LOOKING FOR advertising, 
public relations. 
Or business major 
interested in being 
classified student 
advertising manager 
for the Kansas State 
Collegian adver- 
tising department. Must 
have a flexible 
schedule, be able lo 
work at least 3- 4 
hours per day, and have 
excellent tele 

phone skills. For 
applications and further 
information contact 
Annette or Gloria at 
532-6560 



MANHATTAN FLORAL is 
accepting eppii- 
cations for a full-time, 
year round secre 
tarial position. Apply 
in person at 630 
Poynti Ave. 

MARKETING PART-TIME. 
Sophomore or Ju- 
nior. Marketing Major. 
15 lo 20 hours per 
week, own 

transportation. 
Godfather's 
Pitta call Mrs. 
Chambers 

(800)937-0112, Mon- 
Tues.. 1- 4p.m. 
only 

PART TIME HELP needed 
mornings. after 
noons and evenings. 
Apply in person 
8530 East Highway 24. 

PART-TIME MANAGER- to 
hire/ train sales 
and management 
personnel. Good com- 
munications skills 
required. Recorded 
message reveals details. 
537-2662. 

PART TIME MASSAGE 
Therapist 10 to 12 
hours per week, 
afternoons. Will train. 
Therapeutic Massage 
776-0022 

STUDENT COMPUTER 
Consultant, 15 20 
hours pet week, to start 
as soon as possi- 
ble, as a consultant for 
faculty, staff, and 
students. Selection 
criteria will be a com- 
bination of paid work 
experience. Micro 
computer, mainframe. 
and UNIX knowl- 
edge; grade point 
average; and longevity 
potential Applications 
will be accepted by 
Joyce Henderson. 
Room 26. Cardwell 
Hall, through August 
31. EOE 

STUDENT OFFICE assistant 
needed. 10- 15 
hours per week during 
fall and spring se- 
mesters, 30- 40 hours 
per week during the 
summer and possibly 
during school breaks 
and between semesters. 
Duties include 

word processing 
.WordPerfect), book- 
keeping, answering six 
telephone lines. 
proofreading, typing, 
filing, and some 
heavy lifting. Must be 
dependable and able 
lo accurately follow 
instructions. Work 
study preferred but not 
required. Contact 
Deb at 532-5970 

THE COUNTRY'S lop nanny 
broker will be in 
town to interview 
prospective nannies for 
the New York metro 
area, for both sum- 
mer and full-lime 
positions Saturday 
only<913l456-7483. 

WANTED RESPONSIBLE 
person with some 
experience operating a 
Power Take Off 
grinder mixer with 
some mornings avail- 
able. Call 1-457-3440 
before 8a.m. 

WtCHIT A EAGLE a accepting 
applications 
for daily home delivery 
carrier, Manhat- 
tan. Reliable 
transportation a must 
seven mornings a week. 
Bond deposit 
required (8001825-6397 
ert. 531. 



330 



The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po 
tontial of edvarti soman ts 
lit tha Employment 
classification. Readers 
ara adviaad to ap- 
proach any such 
employment opportunity 



reasonable caution. 
Tha Collegian 

urgoa our raaderi to 
contact tha Bettor 
Businaes Bureau, 50 1 S€ 
Jaffarson, Top* 

ka. KS 66607 1190. 
(913)232-0*84. 

$200- $500 weekly. Assemble 
products at 

home. Easy! No selling. 
You're paid di- 
rect Fully guaranteed. 
Free informa- 

tion— 24 hour hotline. 
801-379-2900. 
Copyright 'KS13KDH 

ALASKA SUMMER 

employment— fisheries. 
Earn $5,000 plus/ 
month. Free transpor 
talionl Room and 
boardl Over 8.000 
openings. No 

experience necessary. 
Male or female. For 
employment program 
call Student 

Employment Services at 
1- 

206-545-4155 ext 
A5768 

ASSEMBLERS: EXCELLENT 
income. easy 

work assembling 
products at home. 
Seven day. 24-hour 
service. Information 
1504)646-1700 Dept 
P6438. 



OPEN 
MARKET 



410 



Items tor law 



AMAZING 'ONE Day Dief 
it sweeping the 
nation. Lose 16 to 20 
pounds in 30 days. 
Guaranteed! No drugs, 
no pills, no 

blenders, no hassles. 
Call 776-3656 

CARPET FOR dorm room. 
Gray, used one 
year $50 Call 537-9700. 
9- 5 Monday- 
Friday. 

ENTERTAINMENT SET with 
CD player and 
dual cassette player. 
Comes with detach- 
able speakers. $275. 
539 4319 

FOR SALE: four cubic foot 
Avsnti refrigerator, 
runs beautifully, has 
nev«r needed serv- 
ice, $80 Cal 1-4683381 

FOUR- CUBIC foot 
refrigerator for sale. Ex- 
cellent condition $90. 
Call 776-4266 

FUTON FULL site, frame 
$90, matreas $50 
Call Martina 537-2473. 
7p.m,- 10p,m 

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS: 
Camoflage cloth- 
ing, field jackets, 
overcoats, new G.I 
boots, sleeping bags 
Also CAflHARTT 
workwear. Monday- 
Saturday, 9- 5. St. 
Marys Surplus Sales, 
St Marys, KS. 
1-437-2734, 

SAMICK ACOUSTIC guitar 
with case 

537-1867 ask for Dan 

WINDOW UNIT air 
conditioners for tale. 
28.000 BTU, $300.14.000 
BTU $50 

5,000 BTU, 110 volt. 
$75. 776-9069 



Classified Directory 



6Vo 



bulletin 

boar: 



010 AnnOtmcarntnlS 

020 Lost and Found 

090 Personais 

040 Meetings/Events 

050 Partjes-n -More 




106 hVnert- 
Apt Furnished 

110 ForRenJ- 

npt urnwrMnw 



118 Ftoorns Available 

110 For Rent — Houses 

IH FcrSate-HauMG 

130 For Rent - 
MoWe Homes 

138 For Sale- 
Mobile Homes 

140 r^fiem-Garsge 

148 Roommate Wanted 

180 Sublease 

188 StabtePasfuTB 

180 Ofrice Space 

188 Land tor Sale 




808 Tutor 



210 ResumarTypeip, 
81S Desktop Piifenins 
220 SewtfigvAtferalions 
228 Pregnancy Testing 
220 Lawn Care 
838 Ch*1 Care 
240 Musio3n*DJs 
248 ^Services 
250 Automotive Repair 
888 Other Services 




EMPLOYMENT 
CAREERS 



310 Htkj Wanted 

320 Volunteers Needed 

830 Busnes* 
OpportunAts 




OPEN 
MARKET 



406 WarrtedroBuy 

410 Items for Sate 

418 Furniture to Buy/See 

480 Oarage/Yard Sales 

Aucfon 

Anftques 

438 Computers 

440 FoodSpectafs 

448 Music teroroertte 

480 Remind Supples 

488 Sporting Eqtapment 

480 Stereo Equipment 

488 Tickets to Buy/Sen 




TRANS 
P0RTATI0H 



110 AutornoMes 
820 Bicycles 
830 Motofcyetea 
840 Car Pool 




610 Tour Packages 
880 Airplane Tickets 
830 Train Tickets 
840 BusTiekefs 



CATEGORIES 

To help you find what you are 
looking lor. the classified ads 
have been arranged by category 
and sub-category All categories 
are marked by one of the large 
images, and sub-categories are 
preceded by a number 
designation 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always put what item or 
service you are advertising first 
This helps potential buyers find 
what they are looking for. 

Don't use abbreviations Many 
buyers are confused by 
abbreviations 

Consider including the price. 
This tells buyers rl they are 
looking at something In their price 
range 

WE DO NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS OR LAST NAMES IN 

PERSONALS 






' 



AGGIE'S NEW TO YOU 
Second Hand Store 

537-8803 

■avaa tutu-*** uMian 



415 



Fanttmis 

fluy/lall 




GREEN AND white couch 
S50. two green 
swivel chairs $5 a piece 
539-6896 

NICE. COMFORTABLE 
couch. 7 feet long, 
$100. Call, leave 
message, 53? 1783 or 
532-6170 

SMALL DORMITORY 
refrigerator. $50 1992 
Schwmn Impact Pro 
mountain bike, 21 
inches. $350 5398762. 

TWIN BED for sale. 
Complete. $75 or best 
off 

er. Call 776 5582 and 
leave message. 

WHITE WICKER six drawer 
tall lingerie 

chest. Excellent 
condition. Great dealt 
539-3075 

WOHLERS USED Furniture, 
61S North 3rd, 
539-3119 Open 10a.m. 
6p.m. Monday- 

Friday; until 8pm 
Thursdays; Saturday- 
Sunday 1 5p.m. 



Wohler's 
Used Furniture 

Open M-F 10-6 

Thursdays til fj p.m. 

Sat & Sun. 1-5 p.m. 

615 N. 3rd 539-3119 



420- 



fatrset/VanJ 



WE DON'T have rooml 
Many items like new. 
S'k13' blue carpet. 
appliances, full-sued 
bed, couch, chair, ptasDC 
crates, com- 

pact vacuums, phones, 
coolers. drawing 
paper, file folders. 
curtains and much 
more. Call 776-7573 for 
more informa- 

tion. 



435 



386SX. VGA. two-MB rem, 
89MB HD. five 

and one- fourth Inch and 
three and one- 
half inch drives, mouse. 
modem. $1250 

or best offer Call 
539-7795 

IBM-PC, COLOR screen, 
keyboard mouse. 
Epson printer $550. 
Doug 537-7054 

LC MACINTOSH, color 
monitor with soft- 
ware. $1900. 539-1127. 

MAC CLASSIC, four meg 
ram, 40 meg hard 

drive Stytewriter printer 

$1450. 

537-8990 

NOTEBOOK COMPUTER, 
Toshiba T2200SX. 
386 2OMHZ,50M8hard 
drive, very small 
and compact only 5.5 

Counds, Microsoft 
all point mouse 
included. Must sell. 537 
0468. 

PC, MONOCHROME 
monitor, two floppy 
drives, 15 inch printer, 
manuals. soft- 

ware (including word 
processing pro- 
gram). Excellent 
condition. $400 or best 
Offer. 537-6867. Ask for 
John. 




ELECTRIC GUITAR- Castilla 
customised 
Jackson Charval 
Humbucker pickup. 
Whammy bar. new 
GHS strings SITS or 
beet offer. Cel 532-2289 
ask for Andy. 



450*"**" 



INTERESTED IN owning a 
pet, but cats and 
dogs aren't allowed? 
Gel a rabbit, they 
are a great substitute. 
Call 539-7128. 

TEN- GALLON aquariums 
$10.99 special- 

Hand fed cockatiols, 
love birds etc. Visit 
our store for complete 
bird supplies. Pels 
n Stuff. 1 105 Waters 
539-9494 






CO PLAYER- Technics, ongle 
disc pro- 

grammable, remote 
compatible, $100 or 
best offer. 632-2573, 
Jon. 

FOR SALE: Alpine pull-out 
car stereo. Clari- 



on three-ways. Like 
new. Make offer. 
776-0757. 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 




1976 DODGE Dart 71,000 
miles. Runs well 
$1000 or best offer call 
539-8333 

1976 DODGE Monaco, two 
door. Reliable. 

$800 537 8804 

1978 CUTLASS Supreme 
260 V8, auto, air, 
power steering, 
maintenance log Runs 
wen, $1 150 or best offer, 
call 532-5600. 

1978 IMPALA 350. automate 
transmission. 
Best offer Call 539-2453 
before 11a.m. 

or after 6p.m. 

1984 TEMPO two-doors. 
60,000 miles. Auto 
transmission, air 
condition, cassette. 
asking for or best offer. 
Call Clamant 

537-9852 

1986 MAZDA RX-7. runs, 
drives and looks 
excellent must sell need 
cash this 

week $3800 or beat offer 
537-4272. 

1988 FORD Escort excellent 
condition, $1000 
or best offer 5394990. 
ask for Juice, 

1988 THUNDERBIRO Turbo 
Coupe. fully 

loaded, low mileage, 

excellent condi- 

tion, $8900. negotiable 
776-5137 

CHEAPI FBI/ US seized 
1939 Mercedes 

$200, 1986 VW S50. 
1987 Mercedes 

$100 1965 Mustang 
$50. Choose from 
thousands starting $25 
Free information 
24 hour hotline. 1801) 
379-2929 Copy 

right number KS13KJC 

PROTECT YOUR vehicle 
from the elements 
Have your car waxed 
before winter sets 
in. Call for pricing and 
appointment 
587-0384 

VW BUG 1975. new. rebuilt 
engine, good in- 
terior. $1350, call 
Martina 537-2473 
7p.m.- tOp.m, 




12- SPEED Elite tour bicycle- 
new- $125 or 
best offer. 1913)785 
2604. 

1990 SCHWtNN MOS Impact 
mountain bike. 

Call 539 0507 for 
information. 

1990 TREK 1100 58 em 
Shimano 105. Call 
776-7091 

1992 PARAMOUNT SR40 
mountain bike. 

Many extras: speedo. 
climb bars, head- 
light, worth $900 plus; 
S650. Call 

776-2257. 

GOOD TOURING 12-speed 
bike. Nishiki In- 
ternational, suntour 
components S19S 
Doug Fox 537-7054 

SCMWINN TRAVELER. 12- 
speed, 20 inch 
cherry red; in such 
excellent condition, I 
must be crazy to sell it 
for $85; 

776-9021. 

WOMEN'S 10- speed; 21" 
Fuji, ridden less 
than 50 miles, perfect 
condition. $90 776- 
9435 




1990 HONDA CBR 600. 
excellent condition. 
$2950 537 9674. 

1992 ZX7 Ninta Showroom 
condition match- 
ing cover, helmet. 700* 
miles, under war- 
ranty. $6S00. Days 
539-1926, evenings 
537-0343 ask for flritt. 



GET 

THE 

WORD 

OUT. 



832-6606 



1 4 Au9U,t 28 > 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



'Thunderheart' worth seeing 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 

advantage of the beautiful country 
around him. 

"Thunderheart" is not for the 
faint of heart. The film is replete 
with violence, especially a graphic 
murder scene. 

Even though the story line drags 
at limes — and tries to make one 
too many stabs at political 
correctness — it makes up for the 
lack of enthusiasm with overall 



intensity. 

The similarity to "Three 
Amigos" comes ai the end of the 
film when good finally meets evil. 
Anyone who has seen "Three 
Amigos" will chortle at the climax 
of the movie. 

Overall, the movie is definitely 
worth seeing. 

"Thunderheart" plays at 7 and 
9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 
7 p.m. Sunday in Union Forum 
Hall. 



Iraq no-fly zone enforced 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

on Wednesday, both by helicopter* 
crossed the line. 

"I don't think anybody expects 
anything to happen immediately,' 
White House spokesman Marlin 
Fitz water said Thursday. 

"The evidence at this point is 
Saddam is not looking for a 
confrontation. It appears that he's 
keeping his aircraft above the 32nd 
parallel." 



In Baghdad, the government 
denounced the ban as aggressive, 
illegal ant* unjust, and it said 
Saddam n hi order action against 
allied aire t. 

An official statement on 
Baghdad radio said Iraq will resist 
and will not let "the enemy choose 
the timing and the method 
appropriate to them to achieve their 
evil purposes." 



Senate fills finance position 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

which would be reduced to 
approximately $14 in the event the 
motion is passed next week. 

If the motion were to fail, the 
funds would be put in a reserve 
contingency account available to 



other campus organizations. 

Current Coordinator of Finance 
Sean Wissman. is transferring to 
Harvard, leaving his position 
vacant. Senate agreed to support the 
nomination of applicant Sarah 
Caldwell to fill the position. 




ffl! UAiAltSt 



MANHATTAN'S NEWEST A&E MAGAZINE 
MONTHLY IN THE COLLEGIAN 




August27-28 10am-4pm 
Front Lawn ol Tha K-SUta Union 

IWHI» | !■ ■«——« | J ! ■ ! ■*■ ■ ■ i 



OL 



Dr. Jeanne 

KJopfenstein 



^ 



Optometrist 

Fonllj Ej* C»cr 

3202 klmball 

Candlrwnod Shopping 

Center 

776-2255 



The 
Sport Sandal. 




* Soft nvkm 
straps 

* Arch support 

* Comfortable, 
secure fit 

* Easy on ami oil * 

* All Terrain sole 




304 Poyntz* Downtown 
Mon-Fri 9-6 
Thurs 9-8 
Sat 9-5 
Phone 539-5639 



Little Caesars 

CHEESER! 
CHEESER! 




2 MEDIUM PIZZAS 



WiTHe> 



EXTRA CHEESf. 3 TOPPINGS 



**> ;-. j>-'- 



p^ FREE Crary Bread 

$ 



JJ98 



'*§!& 



little Caesars ® RzzalPizza! 

TWo great pl»a»f One low price" Alwayi! Arwaytl 

Westloop Center • 539-3333 



ACCEPT 



ASSIGNMENT 





DERMATOLOGY 

Robert H. Cathey, M.O.P.A. 
Dlplomate Am Board Dermatology 

DISEASES OF SKIN • HAIR • NAILS 
•SICm CANCER • COLLAGEN INJECTIONS 
•SPIDER VEIN TREATMENT 

(Marf\attanJn Except On Days BeOw) 
Jtroon Ccy ... .1 st & 3rd wed. erf eacn moor 
AWene..,2nd Wed. of eacn monti 
For any appointment call 

537-4990 

1133 College Av 



UPPER LEVEL 
BLDG B 



vMUAatr couroN 



VMUAME COUrW 




TOUHCHOtCt 

• ONE OF EACH' 

• PAN'PAN'" 

•PIZ2AIPI22A!' 



PARTY PACK! 

14 large pJriM wtth cheese 
and 1 topping* 
ptus two 3? ox. toft drtnks 

$20^ 

VOURCHOKI 

• 4 PIZZAS 

• ANY COMMNAIICW 

• PANOitnouNrx 



MrkocMng L.tw Cusurt Ettt 



lain lO/'S'M 



itmi iwil/M 




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Lender Code: 817846 



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I 




C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 




AUGUST 31. 1992 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99, NUMBER 6 



Dread Zep welcomes KSU back 













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HURRICANE ANDREW 

Florida 
picks up 
the pieces 



ASSOCIATED PASS* 



J. KYli WY4TT 

Lead guitarist Jah Paul Jo (left), lead singer Gary B.l.B.B and the rest ol Dread Zeppelin play a Led Zeppelin cover during the Welcome Back Concert. 



Attendance lower than 
expected for annual concert 



"There 
were 

about 625 
people 
there. We 
were really 
hoping for 
a better 
crowd." 

KIM HARMS 



REVIEW 
PAGES 



ANDY WOODWARD 
Cotlegian 

Saturday's 12th annual 
Welcome Back Concert was 
something less than a financial 
success, said Kim Harms, Union 
Program Council adviser. 

"There were about 625 
people there. We were really 
hoping for a better crowd," 
Harms said 

The concert at Memorial 
Stadium was sponsored in part 
by KSDB-FM 91 .¥ and UPCs 
Special Events Committee. One 
of the committee's goals was to 
program the concert especially 
for K State students. Harms said. 

The lackluster attendance 
puts Special Events in a 
financial Catch-22. The 
committee spent most of its 
budget on the concert. 

"Special Events took a hit on 
this one. We can't get a bigger 
name unlil we gel more money.'' 
Harms said. 




J. KYII WVATT Collegian 

Roach Factory's Brian McCallum (left), Lincoln Under (center) and Derek Macy play second in the lineup. 



PERRINE, HI a — Pastors and churchgoers 
heard messages of hope and thanks Sunday in 
Hurricane Andrew's aftermath, while hundreds 
of thousands sought relief from heat. rain, traffic 
and shortages. 

Volunteers were joined by troops called out 
by President Bush. Troops in cargo planes and 
helicopters carrying tents, clothing, water and ice 
reached the heavily damaged areas. 

Health officials feared disease could arise 
from a lack of clean water and rotting food, and 
garbage covered by swarms of mosquitoes. 
Meanwhile disorganization continued to plague 
the massive and sometimes overzealous relief 
effort. 

"I'm hot: I'm tired," said Gwen Bullock, an 
official from hard-hit Florida City. "My wire is 
getting shorter and shorter." 

An Army Chinook helicopter also sat on the 
runway, waiting to be unloaded. The aircraft was 
loaded with bottled water, fruit juice, iced tea. 
and pallets of charcoal and lighter fluid. 

'ill follow anybody who's in charge. But we 
need somebody in charge right now." Coast 
Guard Lt. Cmdr. Mike Anderson said 

He complained that the various military. 
gov e rnm ent and local authorities were operating 
on different radio frequencies. 

i can't even get hold of the front gate," 
Anderson said. 

Army Chief of Staff Gen, Gordon Sullivan 
arrived from Washington to lour the disaster 
zone wltn military supply and logistics 
commanders. He assured local officials in 
Homestead he wwuld improve communications 

The first "tent cities" would begin to go up 
Sunday night. Sullivan said, adding that other 
supplies were coming. 

Religious and political leaders tried to rails 
spirits. 

"We don't know how ihis is all going to be 
put back together again." the Rev. Matthew Co\ 
said "But God comes in a vision to say: 'Do not 
be afraid.'" 

Gov Lawton Chiles, the Rev. Jesse Jackson 
and Archbishop Edward McCarthy were among 
those who spoke to congregations 

"Somebody said this area will never be the 
same," Chiles said, "1 think that's nght — it's 
going to be even better " 

Authorities said four disaster-aid field offices 
were open, and 1 1 more were set up Sunday. 
Some 160 miles of road had been cleared, and all 
primary roads were open. 

Banks and check-cashing services opened 
Sunday, and distribution of government checks 
began in the disaster area. Letter carriers made 
rare Sunday home deliveries in other parts of 
Dade County. 

More than two inches of rain fell on some of 
the ravaged areas Saturday, and thundershowers 
scattered across South Honda again Sunda> 

The heavy rains soaked donated clothes and 
food on the ground 

As of midday Sunday, Florida City still hadn't 
received the promised Army tents to house up to 
2.500 homeless. Workers finished bulldozing a 
campsite targeted for the tents. 

State authorities said complaints of illegal 
opportunism were diminishing Sunday. Five 

■ See RELIEF page 10 



NEWS DIGEST 


► KANSAS CITY CRIME RATE HIGH 


KANSAS CITY. Mo <AP) 


Tne national rate was 758 per 


— Kansas City-area residents 


100.000 The area's overall 


are more likely to be victims of 


crime rate, 7,479 crimes per 


violent crime than the national 


100,000 people, also was 


population crime statistics 


higher than the national 


show. 


average of 5,898, 


There were 1 ,175 violent 


The FBI compiles 


crimes per 100,000 residents 


nationwide crime statistics 


in the 10-county metropolitan 


each year from 16,000 law 


area in 1991 , according to a 


enforcement agencies. 


FBI report released Saturday. 




► SADDAM CONDEMNS FLIGHT BAN 


BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) — 


by Iraq's military. 


President Saddam Hussein 


In the 50 -minute statement. 


vowed Sunday on Iraqi radio 


Saddam claimed the allies 


to resist the "no-fry" zone 


were plotting to partition the 


imposed over southern Iraq by 


Arab world to seize control of 


U.S. -led allies, but ottered no 


its oil wealth. In Washington. 


actions his government might 


White House spokesman 


take. It was his first statement 


Walter Kansteiner said the 


about the ban, imposed 


action was taken because Iraq 


Thursday to protec* Shiite 


violated a UN no-aggression 


Muslim rebels from air attacks 


resolution. 



MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS 



Calling for a new American dream 



Martin Luther King's 

vision remembered 



Collegian 

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke Aug. 28, 
1 463, in Washington, D.C., about his dream for 
America 

Saturday, more than 1 00 people in Triangle 
Park celebrated the 29th anniversary of King's "I 
Have a Dream" speech. 

Keynote speaker, the Rev. Mac Charles Jones, 
pastor of St. Stephen Baptist Church in Kansas 
City, Mo., challenged listeners to create a new 
dream for America and right the wrongs done to 
minorities. 

"Our only hope lies in the creating of a new 
vision," Jones said. "The only way out of this 
nightmare is to find some new dreams and 
dreamers. 

"Somehow we have got to begin visioning 
differently than we have been visioning before," 
Jones said "We have got to put down the myths 
and understand that just as Eastern Europe failed 
before our eyes, right before our eyes America is 
dying." 

It is hard to acknowledge that America is 




Da aghM 



Josephine Mwamuye (middle), sophomore in apparel design; Alice O|inadou (right), 
graduate student in agronomy; and Grave Ogwal (background) dance at Triangle Park Saturday. 



(ailing, Jones said. 

"The system in which we live does not benefit 
the majority of its citizens," Jones said. "It is a 



system that still benefits a few. 

"When you look at America. Native 

■ Sec DREAM page 3 



August 31, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIA! 




FOLLOW UP 



Fewer class sections 
canceled this fall 



WAOC 



Students returned last fall to 
discover many classes bad been 
canceled doe to University budget 
cuts. 

Tbis year's enrollment 
adjustment belpcd lower tbe 
number of classes lost due to lack 
of money. 

Fewer class sections were 
canceled tbis fall. In several areas, 
Ibe number of class sections 
actually increased 10 meet tbe 
growing interests of students in tbe 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

'"There are actually more class 
sections of Expository Writing I 
than tbis time last year," said 
William Feyerbarm, assistant dean 
of tbe College of Arts and 
Sciences. "Tbe classes are a bit 
smaller, but we are instructing more 
students than in tbe past" 

Expository Writing I. formally 
English Composition I, was an area 
bard-hit by budget cuts last fall, 
Feyerbarm said. 

Tbis time last year, tbere were 
118 English Composition I classes. 
Tbis year, we have 127," said Dean 
Hall, head of the English 
department "I don't know exactly 
where tbe money to avoid big cuts 
came from. All I know is that tbe 
dean's office found tbe money 
somewhere. We were able to add 
classes right and left" 

The University avoided 
canceling classes by using much of 
its SI 69-million enrollment 
adjustment given by tbe Kansas 
Legislature. 

According to Feyerbarm, tbe 
largest share of the enrollment 
adjustment went to tbe College of 
Arts and Sciences to restore class 
sections cut in February. 



"All in til, we tried to balance 
tbe deficit of tbe college against tbe 
required cuts. Tbe provost provided 
us with some money, but we 
managed to avoid widespread 
cancellations," Feyerbarm said. 

Hall said tbis has been the best 
year for anticipating student 
numbers. 

"The waiting lines for classes 
are nowhere near what tbe wait was 
last year," he said. "Tbere are 
faandfuls waiting this year. Last 
year, tbere were mobs." 

Upper-level English courses are 
full, but tbe wailing lists are not as 
long. Hall said. 

Feyerbarm said some lectures 
were canceled, but tbe cancellations 
were due to staffing changes 
instead of budget cuts. 

In colleges that canceled a class 
section, tbe remaining class 
sections were enlarged to absorb 
tbe students. 

"We did have to cancel some 
English classes, but it was because 
some of our staff went on 
sabbatical, vacation or other 
staffing reasons. Mot because of 
budget cuts," Hall said. 

" The real problem this semester 
has not been budget cuts. Most of 
our cuts were planned in February," 
Feyerbarm said. Toe real problem 
has been a bottleneck of students in 
tbe College of Arts and Sciences." 

According to Feyerbarm, tbe 
number of students enrolling in 
courses offered by tbe college is 
increasing. 

Tbe number of students leaving 
other colleges, especially business, 
engineering, architecture and 
human ecology; bas created a 
bottleneck in our college. They are 

■ See CUT CLASSES page 1 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 



_ _. -.... — e — . 1 .- 

H a a —w iw^WMMim ma, n»»>«r, K*n.,msoi Hi rmiaan » 

Juring «w Htwnl rw and «n • -aa* amuo* in* summar Saom* «*■• 
«0* • pan) m Manha tt a n , Kan.. WHS 

POSTMASTER Sand ajj j m cnangaa to Km Sum C aaj g i, O l .ll:' att. Kaart* KM. 
Kmtl. HSM 71«7 

by ajaaftana. (t1S) S33-CSSC. <x <M Cotaaaw warn 

*acaMte<t1H 




POLICE REPORTS 

K-STATi POLICE 

These reports are taken directly from tbe daily log of the KSU Police 
Department Because of incomplete information in tbe log, not all campus 
crimes are listed here. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 mmmmmmmWmmmWBWmWmmW 

At 7:01 p.m. a criminal damaga to An unknown auspact —rate ha)d tha 
property raport am* "Jsd In lot B-3E, trunk of tha vtctim's vohkta. 

Sunday, august so mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtmrn 

At 5 07 p.m. an ambulanca At 7 p.m. a whita 1984 Dodga with 

raipondad to Goodno* 145 for a Iowa licanea Mo. VPK 539, waa 

hood Injury t ub too t warn kanaportod raportod dtoabtad In lot A 2t 

tol 



CAMPUS BULLETIN 



RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



These reports are taken directly from tbe daily log of tbe Riley County 
Police Department. Because of space constraints, not all crimes appearing 
in the log are publish d. 

Sunday, august 30 tsmmmmmmmmmwmwmmmmmm 



At 12:40 a.m. Jaion W. Haaalar, 
10 1 5 Dantaon Ava , No. 7, was laauad 
a notica to appaar tor patty thaft, 
minor In poaaaaalon of alcoholic 
liquor, raaiatfng arraat and unlawful 
uaa o( a Kanaaa drivar • Hcanaa. 

At 12:40 am. Unco M. Haaalar, 
1031 Bluamont Ava., No. 9, wn 
laauad a notica to appaar lor potty 



At 2:13 a.m an attempted bur alary 
raport waa lilod altar an unknown 
aubtoct attampiad to cut opon a aafo 
in tha VFW butidkio, 212 S. Fourth St 

At »;16 a.m. a groan, IS-foot Old 
Town canoa waa takan from 1731 
Laramia SL A tholt raport waa Iliad. 
Loaa waa SS25. 

At 11:16 am an abandonad canoa 
waa raportod in tha yard at 1015 N. 
Sunaot Ava. Tho canoa waa raturnod 
lofnaownar. 

At 12:23 p m Boyd L. Arcanaaux, 



Blua V allay TraDar Court, No. 80. waa 
arraatod for tarrorlatic thraata, phona 
haraaamanl and violation of a 
raavalnlng ordor. Ha waa rataaaod on 
12.500 bond 

At 12:47 p.m. a 10-gallon 
aquarium, a four-foot long python 
ana tea and a haat rock war a a tol an 
from Fairmont Traitor Court, No. 3. A 
burglary raport waa filad. Loaa waa 
$174. 






monday, august 31 ^mmmmmmMm^mmmmmmm 

■ Chimes wilt meet from 7 to 8 p.m. in Union 200. 

■ Engineering Student Council will meet at 6:30 p.m. in Durtand 
152. 

■ The Graduate School has scheduled the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Tanya MacLaurin for 10:30 a.m, in Justi 
146. 

■ Youlh For Change will mee* at 7 p m. in Union 209. Topic will 
be Gloria O' Dell's campaign for U.S. Senate. 

■ Ice Hockey Team will meet at 6 p.m. in the Union basement 
lobby. 

■ "Just G'rys" will meet at 7:05 p.m. in Union 212. 

■ Men's Volleyball Club will meet at 7:30 p.m. in Aheam 
Gymnasium, 

■ College Republicans will meet at 7 p m. in Union Little Theatre 

■ Engineering Student Council will meet at 5:30 p.m. in Durtand 
152. 

■ American Indian Science and Engineering Society will meet a 
6:30 p.m. in Union 205. 

■ Water Ski Team will meet at 9 p.m. in Union 207. 

■ Computer and Networking Services will sponsor a free lecture 
on using operation systems on the University mainframe from 3:30 
to 4:20 p.m. in Cardwell 101. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 .ftWHLaaaaafMMaTMBHafaMaM 

■ Rodeo Club executive meeting will be at 5 p.m. in Weber Blocl 
and Bridle Lounge. 

■ Young Democrats will meet to organize fall campaigns at 8 30 
p m. in Union 207 

■ Gay/LesbiarvBisexual Support and Development Group will 
have an organizational meeting from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Lafene 
236. 

■ Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity will have an informational 
meeting at 9 p m in Union 204. 



WEATHER 



YESTERDAYS HIGHS AND LOWS 



TODAY'S FORECAST 

I * Today, mostly cloudy, a 20-percent chance of showers and 

I^^^l thunderstorms. High m the upper 70s Tonight, mostly 
I cloudy with a 40- percent chance of showers and 

^^^^^ thunderstorms 

TOMORROWS FORECAST 

| Mostly cloudy with a 40-percent chance of showers and 




thunderstorms High around 80 



EXTENDED FORECAST 



MANHATTAN 


TOPEKA 


goodland 76/52 • 
69/50 • RUSSELL 


m 78/61 W 

KANSAS 

CITY 

N/A 


72/58 


GARDEN CITY 




m 76/54 wichita 

• am 71/62 






COFFEYVILLE 


9 


a) 82/66 



WORLD TEMPERATURES 



Wednesday through Friday A chance of showers and 
&* "N^ . thunderstorms Wednesday Dry Thursday and Friday 
Highs in the 80s. Lows 55 to 65 



CITY 

Amster dam 

Beirut 
Dubl n 



70.55 



SKY 

ram 



Istanabul 



93/75 



dear 



Mac 3 



82/57 



86 73 cloud y Pans 



7057 



cloudy 



59 48 



ram 



Vancouver 



72/52 



_doudj 



Cloudy 



* > i u e i r 

uumcr 




KSU Wildcat 
int Triathlon 



Spr 




CENTER fcr 

EXERCISE 

RESEARCH 



Tattle Creek State Park, River Ponds Area 
10:00am, Saturday, September 12, 1992 

0.3 mile OP^; 9-9 mi| e ^ 3.1 m le 
For information, call Jason Bradley, 776-8082 



u 
> 



X 

o 
s 



CONTEMPORARY BLACK St WHITE PHOrTOGRAnHY • TALBOT • MONET • VAN GOGH 

BACK TO SCHOOL 
POSTER SALE 



Most Images Only $5, $6 and $7 



i 

s 

o 

a" 

c 

> 



in 




WHAT IS IC AT? 

•Students who bach the 'catsl 

•Twenty dollar contribution goes towards the Mike Alvcarn 
Scholarship Fund. 

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF ICAT? 

•Keservcd front row seals in section 24 for Tool ball. 

•Reserved seals in the front rows or section 20 and 21 for basketball. 

•A TREE ICAT T-shirt 

•A kick-off parly al Kite's on Thursday, September 3rd with beverages 

provided from 7-9 p.m. 
•Discounts at ICAT merchant sponsors UALLAKD'S, LOWMAN'S and 
KITE'S throughout the year. 



HOW CAN YOU JOIN ICAT? 

•Qo to Uramiayc Coliseum, Suite 1 30 or call 

532-6910 Tor an application to be mailed to youl 

tt«mfc **W s BALLARD'S ^'.-> 



aWultan, KS SJS-IUi 



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Biggest & 
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XSVXttVA • 3DNVWOM • STVLN3IMO • SH3ISOd TVWINV « SJLNTMd AM3TTVD • HX3AM 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 31, 1092 O 



Dream still not possible for everyone Center assists 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Americans are still dispossessed 
from their land, and Hispanics have 
nothing,'* Jones said. "When you 
look at America, those who arc 
colored, those who are poor, those 
who struggle daily to survive and 
work, find at the end of the week 
that they have nothing. 

"The poor do get poorer, and the 
rich do get richer," Jones said. 
"And yet, I continue to say it's not 
hopeless." 

Jones said reparation must be 
made to those who have suffered. 

"The year 1992, for those who 
are keeping count, is the 500th year 
in which some people are 
celebrating the coming of 
Columbus," Jones said. "Depending 
on which way you stand, this was 
either an invasion or a discovery. 
I've always thought of it personally 
as an invasion." 

The discovery of America 
started the race problems America 
now has. Jones said. 

"It inaugurated the slave trade on 
(liese shores,"' Jones said. "It started 
the genocide of vimially millions of 
native peoples. It began a whole 
kind of aristocracy of power, in 
which poor white people were as 
devastated as anyone else, because 
they had no rights in this nation. 

"We've got to think about 
repairing the damage that has been 
done to those who have been 
victimized by the system." Jones 
said. 

Indian people must be looked 
upon anew, Jones said. 

"Those who run the Washington 
Redskins." Jones said. "Those who 
dare to use their sacred images, 
head-dresses and symbols, and use 
them as sport on national television 




' CUMWUMCoHtqan 

Ll Titha HetteringtoO, 12, keeps her eye on Native American women dancing the "Women's 
Traditional" at the "We are the Dream" celebration Saturday night. 



must be stopped. 

"Somebody's got to lift up who 
the Indian nations are, what they 
have meant and help give them a 
new place to stand," Jones said. 

The first people who could vote 
in America were white, male 
property owners. Jones said. 

"Much of what we see now is 



grounded in what has always been." 
Jones said. "America has always 
been a place where the privileged 
have ruled. The fact of the matter is, 
when you talk about America, 
you're not talking about the land of 
the free. You're not talking about 
this place that is pictured across the 
world as the promised land for 



everybody else." 

Jones said the future relies on all 
Americans. 

"The answer to our future lays in 
us," Jones said. "History will show 
you it is those who don't have 
power that end up changing 
societies, not the rich." 



students in job 
search, preparation 



OataJMe 

Trying to plan the future while 
taking classes is difficult for most 
seniors. 

James Akin, director of the 
Career Planning and Placement 
Center, said seniors should begin 
planning by coming to the fall 
placement orientation sessions. 

At the meeting, students will 
receive packets of information 
about using the center and 
beginning the job-search process. 

The first step is filling out forms 
for a resume. 

"First, the information will be 
put on the computer and the names 
of the candidates will be sent to the 
pre -specified employers," Akin 
said. 

Four programs have been set up 
for this fall to help students leam 
effective job-search techniques. 
Resume building, job-search 
strategies, federal-government 
programs and winning interviews 
are classes that are open to all 
students. 

One of the most important 
services at the center is the on- 
campus interviews. Akin said. 
About 9,000 letters and brochures 
were sent to employers inviting 
them to come to campus. Many of 
the employers have come to K- 
State every year. 

"Tradition has a lot to do with it. 
Some of the employers we've been 



working with for years," Akin said. 

Because of the decrease in job 
availability. Akin said the center is 
looking for new employers — 
many of which are smaller 
companies. The center brings in a 
variety of government agencies, 
along with other large employers. 

Most on -campus interviews will 
start in late September and continue 
through November. Students can 
sign up for appointments beginning 
or after Sept. 8. 

Another program set up by the 
placement center is an interview 
clinic, which not only helps 
students feel more relaxed in an 
interview situation, but helps the 
University to develop relations w iih 
new companies. 

"What happens in the clinics is 
there is a real, live interviewer 
doing a real, live interview. After 
about 20-30 minutes of 
interviewing, the interviewer will 
describe to the candidate how they 
fell." Akin said. 

Akin said the center is working 
on a program in which alumni 
connections can be made for all 
majors. 

Many other activities have been 
planned to assist seniors in the job 
search, such as job fairs within 
colleges and arts and sciences 
Career Week. 

More information on all 
programs is available at the center 
in Holtz Hall. 



New option 
allows study 
of resources, 
environment 



Cssajpi 

K- State students can leam about 
the future of their world and 
receive college credit at the same 
time. 

The Natural Resources and 
Environmental Sciences 

interdisciplinary option is a new 
program offered to help students 



deal with the broad subject of 
natural resources and 

environmental problems. 

The courses help students 
understand existing problems, such 
as water quality and erosion 
control, as well as some possible 
solutions. 

Environmental problems 
Kansas farmers have get special 



attention. 

K-State agronomists are 
working on ways 10 continue 
Kansas' strong farming 
community, and. at the same time. 
save valuable natural resources. 

Steve Thien. professor of 
agronomy, said protection of 
natural resources is an important 
issue. 



"We deal with resources that are 
necessary for food production." 
Thien said. 

These resources are soil and 
water and are being depleted by 
today's intensive tillage practices. 

"Pollution is something of a 
concern." he said, "and agriculture 
is a contributor to environmental 
pollution. However, we do not 



pollute the environment any more 
than other businesses." 

To help curb pollution in Kansas 
farming, agronomists are trying to 
educate farmers about practices that 
will not harm their resources. 

Cooperative Extension Service 
is helping to educate farmers by 
offering information through the 
county Extension offices statewide. 



0NKY0... Quality, Class, and CLEARANCE!! 

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PINION 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



The opinions expressed In 'In Our Opinion* are the opinions of a majority of Editorial Board 
members These views do not necessarily represent the views of Kansas Stale University, Student 
Publications Inc. or the A Q Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communications. 



Samantha Branson 
EdearmCnie/ 

Jared Savage 

Opinion PwgtEMOf 



Erin Perry Richard And™Je John Han 

Amy Cox Jndell Lamer Tom Liucr 

Shiwn Bruce Dcvid Maye* Mirk Erater 

Frank Klcemann Derek Thoman Dsvkf FiUrpi 

Bn*n Anderson Julie Long Mini Qiacotw 



Column* are (he op in ions of 
oriiy the ooiumnnU They do not 
reflect tte Kiens ol trte Kansas 
Stale CoAagtarv. but instead <Mer e 
anVing mewpomt 



AUGUST 31, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



I. 



By the Collegia* Editorial Board 



In Our Opinion ____ 

aWMaHBeWaaMnHMnHaH 

Hurricane uncovers problems 



THE ISSUE 

Many of the 
problems In the 
aftermath of 
Hurricane 
Andrew could 
have been 
avoided with 
better planning 
and less 
bickering. 



WE SUGGEST 

Improved 
disaster relief 
planning and 
prediction 
could save 
money and 



In the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew — 
and due to the terrific political bungling of a 
number of relief agencies and politicians — 
southern Florida has been made to look more like 
a Third World country than the paradise it once 
was. 

Now considered the worst natural disaster in 
the history of the United States, Andrew left 
billions of dollars in damage and thousands 
homeless in his wake of destruction. 

It will be months before accurate figures are 
available, but conservative estimates already say 
the cleanup may cost between $15 and $20 
billion. 

Certainly, it's a disaster in any sense of the 
term. 

But the greater disaster lies in the fact that 
red tape and ineptness on the part of both local 
and federal agencies have made the calamity- 
stricken residents suffer much longer than 
necessary. 

Tremendous traffic jams, chock-full 
telephone lines, lack of electricity and hesitancy 
on the part of the decision-making hubs have kept 
victims from obtaining simple things. Simple 
things such as food, potable water and dry 
clothes. 

Reports of people being stranded in their 



homes for days are common. 

More common than that are reports of plenty 
of supplies and help being available. But supplies 
are sitting, and people are standing around, 
waiting for instructions from leaders who are 
hopelessly lost. 

It's a given that confusion will reign during 
any disaster of such epic proportions. But unlike 
an earthquake or tornado that strikes without 
warning, Andrew's course was tracked for days, 
and his landfall was accurately predicted nearly 
three days before he struck. 

It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure 
out what a hurricane packing 1 70-mph winds is 
going to do to civilization once it arrives. 

Relief agencies should have been fully 
mobilized days before Andrew's arrival. While it 
was a powerful storm, it didn't act in an unusual 
manner. 

If proper planning had been at the fore, 
people could have received aid the day after, if 
not sooner. And certainly not only now. 

Even in Kansas, we know it's hurricane 
season. 

When those in charge figure out that al least 
one strong storm is going to strike every year, 
then perhaps we can avoid another fiasco like that 
in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. 



</> 



VOTE. FOR ONE 



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Readers Write 



b RELIGION 



Letter misinterprets 
true message of Bible 

Editor, 

Mr. Han's column on church 
and Mate i "Civil -liberties groups 
are the real censors") seems to 
have set off some fireworks. 

Unfortunately, the only 
response printed was one 
against it. I have to wonder if 
this is because that is the only 
letter submitted, or if it is 
because that is a view of the 
paper. 

1 was spurred to write after 
reading Mr. Marnell's letter 
responding lo the column. I can 
no longer listen to lies about the 
Bible, Jesus Christ or faith. The 
Bible is the inspired word of 
God and a love letter to people 
of all races. It does not contain a 
single contradiction within itself 
or in reference to known history 
from other cultures. Nor does it 
condone sexism, racism, etc. 

Recognizing something's 
existence does not mean it is 
condoned. 1 recognize the fact 
that rape exists, but I in no way 
condone it. How can lesus' 
reply in Matthew 22:37 be 
justified without contradiction 
Id the rest of the Bible if God 
condoned any of those acts? 

I *as enraged just as much as 
you, Mr. Mamell, when I read 
your letter and what it had to 
say. 

However. I did not sin when 
I got angry at your words, but 
sinned when 1 got angry at you, 
as in Ephesians 4:26. My 
apologies to you. and I ask for 
your forgiveness. That is what 
the Bible condones, and I will 
keep you in my prayers. 

Dave Campbell 
Sophomore/Computer science 

Church and state are 
difficult to separate 

Editor, 

In response to John Han's 
editorial on civil-liberties 
groups, I'm glad lo know that 
you're against censorship and 
all. but your own bias toward 
other people's religious freedom 
is inexcusable. 

You believe lhat Christianity 
is viewed by the average Joe as 



an evil beast that wouldn't be 
missed if driven off the face of 
the earth. Truth is, 95 percent of 
Americans believe in God, 
which 1 hope makes you rest 
easier. 

Therefore, even though there 
is a distinct separation between 
church and state, ihere will 
never be a removal of religion 
from the government. 

I offer the current presidential 
race as an example, particularly 
the family values issue. Do you 
think that Clinton invented this 
issue one day for lack of 
something better to do? I think 
not. For the family value affair 
is made up of those vile Judeo- 
Christian values everyone is so 
wary of. 

And on the subject of Judeo- 
Christian schools, why don't 
you think of them as non- 
religious pressuring institutions? 
Let's imagine your children 
having to chant a Hare Krishna 
mantra before class or getting 
the Hanukkah holiday off. It 
makes it difficult to teach those 
Christian values, or Muslim, or 
Buddhist,- in a situation like that, 
huh? 

The public sector is for 
everyone. which means 
neutrality is a must, not a joke. 

Matt Moore 
Junior/Anthropology 

b SOAP OPERA 

Chronicle suffers 
from lack of talent 

Editor. 

Sue Parnnan's Russian sqap 
opera. "One Day to Live." is 
total trash. Not only is it 
painfully stupid, but it is 
offensive as well. 

I imagine ihe uproar that 
would ensue, and rightly so, if a 
similar piece of drivel appeared 
in the Collegian, perhaps 
featuring an "African Hillbilly" 
or a "Mexican Mountain Man." 

Apparently, there are some 
ethnic groups it's still safe to 
pick on, and the Russians appear 
to be one of them. 

Somebody needs to remind 
Ms. Pa rnn an that the Cold War 
is over. Somebody also needs to 
tell her she's not funny. 

Margaret Schmidt 

Senior/Graphic design 



r 



TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR POLICY 

We would like lo hear 
what you think. Sand your 
comments, criticisms and 
complaints to us 

Please include a phone 
number so we can get in 
touch with you in case there 
are questions concerning your 
letter 

Before letters are printed 
in the Collegian, we need lo 
see a picture ID Letters 
submitted may be edited for 
grammar and length 

We cannot guarantee that 
your letter will run, but we will 
try to make sure a sampling of 
both sides of an issue get into 
the Collegian 




COM! BY KEDZIC 1 10 OR SSND 
THEM TO: 

Letters to the Editor 
c/o Jared Savage 
Kansas State Collegian 
Kedzie Hall 116 
Manhattan, Kan. 66506 



Where life truly begins is major crux of abortion issue 



In recent years, no other issue has been 
as emotionally charged as abortion. 
Unfortunately, abortion is difficult to 
discuss because its emotional volatility 
clouds logic. Most abortion debates focus 
on a woman's right to reproductive 
freedom. Yet the real issue is whether 
abortion is murder. If it is murder, then 
reproductive freedom would be rendered an 
irrelevant argument. 

In 1988. Dick Kurtenbach from the 
American Civil Liberties Union mediated a 
flag-burning debate at my high school. The 
debate eventually gravitated to abortion. 
Many approval-seeking students 
approached the microphone and made their 
pro-choice statements to the cheers of the 
largely pro-choice crowd. As my frustration 
mounted. I began formulating questions in 
my mind. After much deliberation. I stood 
and posed the question "If a fetus is not a 
person, then what exactly is it?" to Mr. 
Kurtenbach. 



In the spirit of Ross Perot. Kurtenbach 
responded evasively: "I'm not going to 
force my opinions on you, and you're not 
going to force your opinions on me!" 

Then what precisely is a person? This is 
the core issue of the abortion debate. Pro- 
choicers base their argument that abortion is 
not homicide on three premises. First, they 
claim life is a process, meaning there is no 
one "event" during which a fetus becomes a 
person. Instead, a fetus gradually becomes a 
person. This logic is useful for creating an 
elastic line of person vs. nonperson 
reasoning that can be stretched to fit the 
arbitrary whims of pro-choicers. 

Second, pro-choicers describe the 
unborn as "potential persons" that must 
develop certain qualities before they can be 
called "actual persons." The two most basic 
qualities of actual persons, according to 
Joseph Fletcher, pro-choice ethicist. include 
a "minimum level of intelligence" and 
"individual or separate existence." Fletcher 



has decided for all of us that anyone below 
an IQ of 20 would not qualify as a person, 
and anyone below an 



IQ of 40 would be a 
questionable person. 
Using this reasoning, 
it would be 
acceptable for me to 
kill anyone who 
didn't possess a 
"minimum level of 
intelligence" due to 
severe mental 

retardation, senility 
or a coma. 

This "individual 
or separate 

existence" clause 
excludes the unborn 
from humanity 

because they are not existing separately 
from their mothers. A 6-month-old fetus 
could quite possibly live outside of the 




JOHN 

Hart 



womb, yet it's classified as a nonperson. 
It's unreasonable to believe a fetus 
magically becomes a person once its 
umbilical cord is cut. 

It's like saying an orange on a tree isn't 
an orange until it's picked. All living things 
are actual, thus zygotes are actual persons 
with potential. 

Finally, pro-choice defendants claim 
although a fetus is alive in biological terms, 
it's not a person but a "mass of tissue." Yet 
biology tells us our mental and physical 
stales affect one another. Human life is not 
confined to the physical body. Are the 
retarded and senile "masses of tissue" 
because they don't posses human qualities? 
Pro-choicers offer no explanation or 
reasoning as to when their alleged "mass of 
tissue" becomes a person. 

Abortion is an intensely personal issue 
that doesn't offer any easy decisions. 1 
understand that many other variables, such 
as poverty, affect a woman's decision about 



abortion. Yet in view of the core issue of 
"What is a person?" and the fact that life 
begins at conception. I believe abortion is 
wrong in all circumstances unless the 
mother's life is in danger. 

While discussing this issue with my 
girlfriend, I was forced to deal with the 
question of how I would respond if she 
were impregnated by a rapist. I won't make 
any promises about how I'd react if I were 
to face such an agonizing experience. But 
taking the life of another person wouldn't 
rectify the situation 

I've found all pro-choice arguments are 
at best very vague, offering no definite 
reasons as to why abortion isn't murder. I 
wonder if their arguments are just excuses 
to justify selfish motives, with pro-choice 
logic being a guessing game where the 
losers are executed. When deciding whether 
to spare a life or take a life, uncertainty is 
unacceptable. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 31, 1992 



AGGIEVILLE 

Varsity 
Theater 
to reopen 
Sept. 11 

MATTHSW CUNNWMMAM 



Coltefim 

An Aggieville landmark is 
set to reopen after a six-year 
vacancy. 

Varsity Theater, located 
across from Brothers Tavern, is 
slated to rejoin the Aggievillc 
business community Sept. 1 1 . 
The theater closed in the 
summer of 1986 after trying to 
become a sub-run movie theater 
the last six or seven weeks of 
its existence. 

"The closing came about 
because of the lack of first-run 
movies available," said Bob 
Howard, city manager for First 
International Theaters, which 
owns the Varsity. 

At the time, there were 14 
first -run screens in Manhattan. 
Seth Child Cinema and 
Westtoop 6 Cinema received 
the top runs, and the Varsity got 
whatever else was available, 
Howard said. 

Tom Woolery, regional 
manager of First International 
Theaters, said there were two 
reasons for reopening the 
Varsity. 

"One, we own the property 
and pay taxes on it, and two, 
because of the big success of 
the Campus Theatre at the 
discount rate," he said. "And 
this is an opportunity to 
increase that." 

Though it had been rumored 
the Varsity would become art 
art-film theater, it will be a sub- 
run theater similar to the 
Campus Theatre, which is run 
by the same company. They 
will both run movies that have 
played at Seth Child and 
Westloop. 

But before it's back in 
business, the Varsity will get a 
facelift. 

The company is modernizing 
the theater by reworking the 
seating, as well as turning the 
aisle from stairs into a ramp, 
improving access for the 
handicapped. 

The theater originally had 
seating for 334, but after 
remodeling, the number of seats 
will be reduced to between 225 
and 275 to improve viewing. 

"After the remodeling, the 
seats will he set further back 

■ See THEATER page 10 



(&M 



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1310 Westloop • 776-0864 

Specializing in Office 
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desks • chairs • computer 
furniture • portfolios • brief 

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Next lo Clyde's in Manhattan 



LIVE MUSIC 



The T\ibes to take the stage 
tonight at Brothers Tavern 



Contgun 

The Tubes, famous for their 
1980s hit "She's a Beauty," will 
return lo the Manhattan stage with 
new music and greatest hits. 

They can be seen tonight at 1 1 at 
Brothers Tavern. 

The Tubes' legend is known lo 
those familiar with rock or pop 
culture history. 

They were notorious for their 
wild, state-of-the-art theater shows, 
which were banned in several major 
cities. The band took the 
opportunity to write a song about 
the incident. "Tubes World Tour." 

The Tubes also gained 
popularity when they released 
songs such as "White Punks on 
Dope" and "Slipped my Disco." 



Band member Jennifer McPhee said 
they will perform these oldies as 
well as new songs like "Fastest Gun 
Alive," "fnio The Blue" and "Fish 
House." 

The now songs will be on an as- 
yet-untitled album to be released 
soon, McPhee said. 

As record sales boomed, the 
Tubes seemed to regain acceptance 
socially. They're a likable band thai 
continues to change. The current 
lineup includes band founder and 
songwriter, Roger Steen, 

Sometimes wild and sometimes 



tame, the Tubes know how to 
satisfy the audience. 

"The band's getting a realty 
good response, and everyone's 
liking what we're bringing around." 
McPhee said. 




TUBES TICKETS 

■ Advance tickets are available 
for $8 at Vital Vinyl and 
Broltwrs Tavern, or they may 
be bought at the door for $10. 



Los Compadres 

$2 Off Any 
Dinner Item 

Expires Sept. 15. 1992 

308Vattier - 537-5107 



Thurs. 1 1-2/4:30-9 Fri. -Sat. 11-2/4:30- 10 Closed Sun. 




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Acacia- Sept. 8 
Alpha Chi Omega- Sept. 8-9 
Alpha Delra Pi -Sept. 9-10 
Alpha Gamma Rho-Sept 10-1 1 
Alpha Kappa Alpha-Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Kappa Lambda-Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Phi Alpha-Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Tail Omega-Sept. 14 
Alpha Xi Delta-Sept. 14-15 
Beta Sigma Psi-Sept. 15 
Beta Theta Pi-Sept. 15-16 
Chi Omega-Sept. 16-17 
Delta Delta Delta-Sept. 17-18 
Delta Sigma Phi-Sept. 18 
Delta Sigma Theta-Sept. 1 8 
Delta Tau Delta- Sept. 21 
Delta Upsilon-Sept. 21 
FarmHouse-Sept 21 
Gamma Phi Beta-Sept. 21-22 
Kappa Alpha Psi-Sept 22 
Kappa Alpha Theta-Sept. 22-23 
Kappa Delta-Sept. 23-24 
Kappa Kappa Gamma-Sept. 24-25 
Kappa Sigma-Sept 25 
Lambda Chi Alpha-Sept 25 
Omega Psi Phi-Sept. 28 
Phi Beta Sigma-Sept. 28 
Phi Delta Theu-Sept. 28 
Phi Gamma Delta-Sept. 29 
Phi Kappa Tan-Sept, 29 



Phi Kappa Theta-Sept. 28 
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Putnam-Oct. 14 
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Picture yourself in the 1993 
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a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. 
in the K-Stace Union Room 209. 



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live in a residence hail or off 
campus, please have your photo 
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6 




PORTS 



AUGUST 31, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



K-Stater pumps for the gold 




J. KVU VVATtCoaegw 

Glenn Pendlay senior in kinesiology, won tfM powerlifting portion of the Natural Strength Junior World Championship in weigh Hitting in August in Moscow. 



Pendlay powerlifts in Moscow 



STEVE ROCK 



"I wouldn't 
have kept 
him from 
going for 
anything. I 
had no idea 
where the 
money 
would come 
from, but I 
knew we'd 
get by." 

JUANITA PENDLAY 



CMkpH 

For Wildcat Glenn Pendlay, it 
was truly a golden summer. 

Pendlay. senior in kinesiology, 
traveled to Moscow to compete in 
the powcrlifting portion of the 
Natural Strength Junior World 
Championship in weight! ifting. 

He returned home with the gold. 

"1 couldn't have asked for much 
more," Pendlay said. "The 
competition was pretty lough, and 
I'm real happy with how I did." 

What exactly did the 275- 
pounder from McPherson do? 

Not only did he bench 402 
pounds, dead lift 600 pounds and 
squat 651 pounds, but he also 
lasted the entire competition 
without missing a single lift. Fox 
just the second time in his career, 
he was a perfect nine-for-nine. 

"That's something I'm proud 
of," said Pendlay, who, by his own 
estimation, has won all but three of 
the 14 competitions he has entered. 

Included in Pendlay 'j list of 
victories is the collegiate nationals 
and state championships. 

And Pendlay, who has been 
powcrlifting for just more than a 
year, has even brought the sport he 
loves to Wildcat country. 

Last year, he assembled a group 
of lifters and formed a K- State 
team. Eight members of the squad 
traveled to Dallas, at their own 



expense, to compete in collegiate 
nationals. Anchored by Pendlay, 
who won his portion of the 
competition, the team took a 
surprising second 

Pendlay said the team might 
have taken the first- place trophy 
had more members of the team 
been able to afford the trip. 

The journey to Moscow, which 
cost nearly $3,500, was also the 
responsibility of Pendlay. 

Juanita Pendlay — who. along 
with her husband, Bill, footed the 
bill for her son — said the trip was 
undoubtedly worth it 

"There's no doubt about it," 
Juanita Pendlay said, "t wouldn't 
have kept him from going for 
anything. I had no idea where the 
money would come from, but I 
knew we'd get by. 

"Something will just go unpaid 
this winter." she said. 

Indeed, the trip was more than 
just a chance for Glenn Pendlay to 
lift weights — it was an 
educational experience. 

"The cultural part of it was a 
shock, because it's so different 
there," Glenn Pendlay said. "Their 
standard of living is so low." 

But Glenn Pendlay said that low 
standard of living — the green tap 
water at the hotel, the spoiled meat, 
the raw fish and the shredded 
newspaper used for toilet paper — 
didn't stop him from having a 




Pendlay, who had been lifting tor ■ 

wont to Russia, train* a few time* • 



good time. 

"The people there are probably 
the friendliest people you'll ever 
meet." he said. "They're extremely 
generous." 

And Glenn Pendlay returned 
that generosity with a little 
kindness of his own. 

He soon learned (hat 
weightlifting equipment in 
Moscow is extremely expensive 
and that most lifters can't afford 
even the smallest things. Glenn 
Pendlay had gone to Moscow with 
plenty of equipment, but he 
returned home with considerably 
less. 

He gave away 15 weight suits, 
eight knee braces, six wrist braces 



J. KVU WTATEColtoean 

mora than a year whan ha 
at tha Rac Complex. 



and a number of belts. 

"Glenn has always been so 
terribly, terribly giving," Juanita 
Pendlay said. "He's got the biggest 
heart in the world." 

Juanita Pendlay. who claims to 
be Glenn's No. I fan, and wore a 
sweatshirt announcing it while he 
wrestled in high school, said the 
victor's phone call from Moscow 
is something she won't soon 
forget. 

"He was just like a euphoric 
child," she said. "He was so happy 
and so excited. I had a hard time 
listening to him without crying. 

It couldn't have happened to a 
nicer guy," she said. 



COLUMN 




STEVE 

Rock 



.400. 



Brett 
indeed 
a legend 

The man is a legend. 

In a season riddled with atrocious fielding, 
sporadic hitting and few reasons to look toward 
the future, ageless George Brett has, once again, 
given Kansas City Royals fans something to 
cheer about. 

In 1990, when the Royals were battling in the 
pits of the American League West, Georgie kept 
the fans watching by competing for the batting 
title. It was one of the tightest batting races in 
recent memory, and, as is 
his forte, he did not 
disappoint 

Brett laced a single to 
right field in his final at- 
bat of the season, scaling 
his victory with a .329 
average and becoming the 
only man in major league 
history to win a Silver Bat 
in three decades. 

In 1980. with the 
Royals running away with 
the division title and Brett 
running away with the 
batting title, he again 
packed the stadium by 
trying to achieve 
something that hadn't 
been done since 1941 — bat 

And although Brett tapered off at the end of 
the season, finishing with a measly .390, he 
sneaked over the Ted Williams-esquc plateau and 
thrilled Royals fans and all baseball fans across 
the country. 

This season, a season in which visions of the 
division title faded quickly with a 1-16 start, 
George is at it again. 

Only 16 men in major league history have 
collected 3.000 hits in their careers. Robin Yount 
of the Milwaukee Brewers is just 1 1 hits away 
from the milestone, and he will inevitably achieve 
that this season. 

The illustrious No. 5 is looking to be No. 1 8. 

Perhaps Brett's .276 average, which still ranks 
among the top of the Royals regulars, is proof of 
what has been said for years — as Brett goes, so 
go the Royals. 

In that infamous 1980 season. Brett paved the 
way for the first Royal World Series appearance. 
He drove in a career-high 1 18 runs, despite 
playing in just 1)7 games, and was crowned the 
American League MVP. 

In 1985, when the Royals won their only 
World Scries. Brett had perhaps his greatest 
season ever. Not only did he put up the offensive 
numbers — .335, 30 home runs and 1 12 RBI — 
but his defensive prowess earned him the Gold 
Glove. 

Indeed, the man is a legend. 

Brett will most definitely secure his place in 
baseball folklore by collecting hit number 3,000 
in the 1992 campaign. No doubt about it. 

The baseball era in Brett's life, as much as it 
pains me to say it, is coming to a close. 

Sure, he still has more than enough ability to 
play with the big boys. He can still smack a 
breaking ball low and away to the left center field 
gap with the best of 'em. But he's about to 
embark on another stage in his life: fatherhood. 

Sure enough, Kansas City's most famous 
bachelor, who recently married a local gal, is 
going to be a daddy. 

That reason, and the fact that the Royals are 
trying to bring along new bats like that of Jeff 
Conine and Kevin Kosloski who need a place in 
the lineup, is enough to propel George into a late- 
season surge. 

Yes, George will surely collect his 3,000 hits. 
No doubt about it 

The Royal slugger will thereby provide the 
icing on the cake of an illustrious career and 
secure his place in the Hall of Fame. 

Ah, yes — the man is truly a legend. 



SPORTS DIGEST 



► MAYNE HITS ROYALS 
OVER DETROIT, 9-4 

DETROIT (AP> — Brent Mayne drove in 
three runs and scored three times, leading 
the Kansas City Royais over the Detroit 
Tigers 9-4 Sunday. 

Kevin Appier (15-6). who defeated 
Detroit Aug 19, gave up one run on seven 
hits in six innings. He struck out eight. 

The Royals scored three runs in each of 
the fourth, sixth and seventh innings. 

Eric King (4-5) hurt his own cause by 
walking Wally Joyner and Juan Samuel to 
start the fourth. They moved up on a 
double steal, then scored on a single by 
Mayne. 

Singles by Kevin Koslofski, Gary 
Thurman and Curtis Wilkerson added 
another run. 



► ALTMAN PICKS UP 
FORMER NAVY COACH 

K State basketball coach Dana Altman 
filled his final assistant coaching position 
Thursday by hiring former Navy head 
coach Pete Herrmann. 

Herrmann coached at the US. Naval 
Academy for the last six seasons, including 
the Midshipmen's 1986-87 season. 

► WIMBLEDON WEFALD? 
PREZ CAPTURES PRIZE 

K-State president Jon Wetald 
participated in the Saint Mary Hospital 
Second Annual Golf and Tennis Classic 
last week and came away the winner. 

WefaJd was one of 16 participants in the 
tennis portion, and he won the men's 
division of the event at the Cottonwood 
Racquet Club. 



PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL 



'92 could be Krieg's year 



KANSAS CITY — Hoi one 
game, not so hot the next. 

That's Dave Krieg's history. 

A steady, unbroken chain of 
continuing improvement. 
however, has been the history 
of the Kansas City Chiefs 
during this period fans arc 
calling "the Peterheirnerera.*' 

Now that their destinies arc 
interwoven and largely 
interdependent, one can't help 
but wonder whose history is 
about to undergo an abrupt 
change. 

Will it be Krieg. who had an 
up-and-down 12 years with the 
Seattle Scahawks, in which he 
became the lOth-rated 
quarterback in NFL history, but 



never seemed to reach his full 
potential? 

Or will it be the Chiefs? 

Since Carl Peterson became 
general manager and hired 
Marty Schottenheimcr as coach, 
the one-time NFL sad sacks, 
have become possible Super 
Bowl contenders, featuring a 
rough and-tumble defense, a 
battering ram running game and 
a penchant for not making 
mistakes. 

Their last two seasons before 
Peterson and Schottenheimcr 
arrived, the Chiefs won a total 
of eight games. 

But in the first year of the 
new era, they went 8-7-1 for 
just their second winning 
season in nine years. The next 
season, they were 11-5 and 



made their second playoff 
appearance since 1971. 

Then Last year, they were 10- 
6 and posted their first playoff 
victory since Len Dawson, 
Buck Buchanan & Co., 
crunched Minnesota in the 
1970 Super Bowl. 

Given his talented 
surrounding cast and the 
momentum of two straight 
playoff appearances, the smart 
money might bet that 1992 will 
mark Dave Krieg's finest 
season, 

"If you get to the Super 
Bowl, it's because your team 
performed well in all phases of 
the game, offense, defense and 
special teams," said Al 
Saunders, assistant head coach. 




■ In their last 
two seasons 
before General 
Manager Carl 
Peterson and 
Coach Marty 
Schottenneimer 
arrived, the 
Chiefs won a 
total of eight 
games. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 31, 1002 



Skunks a menace recently in spread of rabies cases 



Colkfitn 

The thought of rabies may bring 
back memories of Old Yeller's 
death. 

This year, however, rabid skunks 
have been a more prevalent menace 
for spreading the contagious 
disease. 

A skunk was captured near 
Seaton Hall this month and taken to 
the Veterinary Medicine Complex 
where it was diagnosed as rabid, 
said K-State Police Chief Charles 
Beckom, 

Campus police use two methods 
to capture sick animals, aside from 
calling in professionals. Setting 
live, baited traps is one method. 
They also use nets and heavy bags 
lo capture animals that arc too sick 
to move, 

Kansas had 335 rabid animals 
reported this year. Of those, 302 
were skunks. There were only 63 
reported cases in 1991. said Dr. 
Deborah Briggs, assistant professor 
of veterinary diagnosis. 

There are several warning signs 
in a skunk's behavior that may 
indicate it has rabies. 

"A skunk with rabies would have 
central nervous system disorder. It 
would appear disoriented. It would 
be circling, falling-down sick, and it 
might be aggressive,"* Briggs said. 

Skunks are nocturnal animals, so 
to even see one during the day is 
cause for suspicion. 

For rabies to be transmitted, the 
skin must be broken, and saliva 
from the infected animal must be 
transferred. 

Anyone who has been bitten by 
what may be a rabid skunk should 



try to capture the animal in case it is 
rabid. If the animal is not captured, 
five post-exposure shots must be 
given. 

This is not necessary if a person 
has been sprayed by a skunk. 

Dogs and cats should receive 
their first vaccination against rabies 
at three months, Briggs said. Once 
pets become exposed to rabies, they 
are either quarantined, re- 



vaccinatcd or put to sleep, 
depending on whether they have 
already been vaccinated. 

Most people, on the other hand, 
have such a small risk of 
contracting rabies that they are not 
given pre-exposure vaccinations, 
said Charles Murphy, director of the 
Riley County Health Department. 

Briggs, who has studied rabit"> in 
skunks since J 969. said he found 



that about every 10 years there i-. a 
tremendous increase in the number 
Of rabid skunk- 

"We always see a peak in the 
springtime, because skunks are out 
and active then," Briggs said. 

Although it is not known why 
the disease becomes more 
widespread in such periodic cycles, 
the weather may have contributed 
to this most recent increase. 



"We had a mild winter. So. a 
severe winter didn't kill them off," 
Briggs said. "The more skunks 
there are in the environment, the 
more chance there is that they'll 
become rabid." 

Skunks, raccoons, foxes, bobcats 
and coyotes are the main rabies 
carriers. Murphy said. These 
animals have a high resistance to 
the disease, and they can live with it 



longer than other animals. 

The best way to deal with these 
animals is to avoid them. Beckom 
said. 

"I encourage people who see 
animals acting out of their norm to 
report it to the police and stay 
away." Beckom said. "There's no 
way of determining what the 
problem is, and it's not worth the 
risk." 



a 



9$ '■ 



® 



SSS3PS3- 



<g9i 



& 



KANSAS STATE CHEERLEADING 
& WILLIE WILDCAT TRYOUTS 

Information meeting and clinic 



Monday Aug. 3 1 


6:30-8:30 p.m. 


Clinics 




Tuesday Sept.l 


6:30-8:30 p.m. 


Wednesday Sept. 2 


6:30-8:30 p.m. 


Thursday Sept. 3 


6:30-8:30 p.m. 


Friday Sept. 


4 6:30-???? 



All sessions will be held in 

Brandeberry Complex located next to 

the KSU baseball Held. 




•The only Video Ground School 'Quality aircraft for your 

Training in the area. personal safety. 

• Professional instructors who • Flexible hours to fly at 

meet all FAA standards your convenience 

"Learn To Fly** Special Ji 

Only $25 for 30 minutes of hands-on flight training 
for an introductory flight with this coupon. 



Kansas Air Center 

Manhattan Municipal Airport 

Main Terminal 

Phone 776-1991 




Mini Lunch Buffet 



Free Delivery 



ttMti 



"All You Can Eat" 

S4.95 per person 
11 a.m. -2 p.m. 



Open 7 Days 



Mini Buffet Features Daily Soup, Egg Roll, Cnspon Wonton, Crab 
Rjgoon. Fried Rice & Fortune Cookie 



Monda> 

Smetand Sour Port 

Beef/Broccoli 
Almond Chicken 



Thursday 

Swea ft Sour Chicken 

Vegetable Shrimp 
Yu Shiang Beef 



Tuesday 

Moo Coo Gai Pan 

SaChaBoef 
Shrimp Lo Mein 



Friday 

Shrimp Egg Foo Young 

Omer»l Tkj-i ductal Wmp 

Beef with Green Pepper 



Free Delivery 

nt anaa 19 00 aria 

Call 539-8888 



Wedacdav 

Seafood Omelette 

Green Ptppa Ctgcfccn 

CunyBeef 



Buffet 
Changes 
Weekly 



Carry Out 
and 

Delivery Available 




Attention Students 

Students are to submit any change 

of name and/or address to the 

Registrar's Office, Anderson 118, 

no later than 9/3/92. Grade 

reports are mailed to student's 

permanent address as recorded in 

the Registrar's Office. 



Interested in Rugby? 

Table in the Union 

Aug. 31, Sept. 1&2 

Mon.-Wed. 9-4 p.m. 
Or call 539-0507 

KANSAS STATE RUGBY 






dfc#1 



K*»Z*!& 









.j#**" 



igp* 




Welcome Back, Students 

Drive 20 minutes to the area's largest 
selection and Lowest Prices. 

Our 13th dimivemrj sale is W^m^^\ 



• Home Stereos 

• Car Stereos & Installation 

• Car Alarms 

• Radar Detectors 

• Televisions 

• Video Recorders 

• Camcorders 



YAMAHA* Bostort^cousflcs 



JVC* 



rjr*fT^w^mfHt^_ 




KENWOOD 

1 -762-4447 

UDIO 
JUNCTION, INC. 



20 Mlnutm Wast! 


t 


£ 


Qrmnt 


7* 


%• 


M 
A 
N 
H 

A 
T 
T 
A 
M 


r 


Ft IUI«y*" 



BB 9S) 



630 Grant Ave) 
Junction City 

MON-FRI 10-7 
SAT 10-5 



Q August 31, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



REVIEW 



■M 



Dread Zeppelin better than ever with new frontman 




AMOV WOODWARD 



J. KVLI WV ATT Collegian 

Oread Zeppelin guitarist Tuna Melt takes a break to pose for a picture with Angle Fenslet macher , senior 
in journalism and mass communications, Saturday night during the Welcome Back Concert. 



Coltegun 

Hcadliner Dread Zeppelin ruled 
the Welcome Back Concert 
Saturday afternoon with Led 
Zeppelin covers, reggae beats and 
disco fusion. 

Truck Stop Love opened the 
concert at Memorial Stadium, 
followed by Roach Factory and the 
L.A, Ramblers. 

Dread Zeppelin was worth every 
penny and more of the $4 
admission. Many of the songs in 
Dread Zeppelin's set were 
impressive, and the band had no 
trouble completely overshadowing 
the opening bands in charisma, 
costuming, stage presence, 
originality and musical quality. 

The original concept of Dread 
Zeppelin was to cover Led Zeppelin 
and Elvis Presley songs to a reggae 
beat. This worked well for the 
band's first release, "Un-Led-Ed." 

Unfortunately, the groups' lead 
singer and Elvis impersonator. 
Tortelvis, left the band and was 
replaced by his friend and former 
Dread bassist Gary B.I.B.B. 
(Bastard Impersonating Butt Boy). 

Any doubts about Gary's ability 
to fill Tortelvis* shoes were 
dispelled when the band took the 
stage. 

The band's garb effectively 
describes the performance: an 
eccentric, diverse hybrid of themes. 



Gary, toting a cane and a sporting 
grayish bouffant, came on stage 
dressed in a gold lame coat -and - 
pants ensemble. 

Guitarist Tuna Melt, whom Gary 
introduced as coming "straight off 
of the Donny Osmond revival tour," 
was dressed only in biker shorts. 
The lead guitarist wore a gingham- 
checked, shin-length outfit from the 
Turtles' "Happy Together" video. 

Dread's set included a cover of 
"Living Loving Mad" off the 
band's first album and a rendition 
of "Stairway to Heaven" from the 
second album. Two new numbers 
were "The Gary B.I.B.B. Theme 
Song" and a slowed-down cover of 
Guns N' Roses* "Welcome to the 
Jungle,** complete with Gary 
sweetly cooing "I'm gonna make 
you bleed." 

The highlight of the show was 
the Village People's "YMCA." 
Dread Zeppelin ended its gig with 
the fast-paced "Disco Inferno." 

Roach Factory's performance 
was adequate. The band definitely 
has a different sound from Dread 
Zeppelin, but it performed the role 
of opening band to the letter. 

The L.A. Ramblers were also 
adequate with a sound somewhat 
difficult to pin to a certain genre. 

But most — if not all — of what 
the first three bands accomplished 
was completely outdone by Dread 
Zeppelin. 



'Northern 
Exposure' 
named best 
drama 

AllOCIATfJP WW 

PASADENA, Calif.— CBS' 
"Northern Exposure" was named 
best drama series Sunday, giving 
the eclectic drama six Emmys at 
the 44th annual TV awards, 

Dana Del any won best dramatic 
actress for her role as a combat 
nurse in ABC's now-canceled 
"China Beach," which has not been 
seen on network television for 
more than a year. 

And the best dramatic actor 
award went to Christopher Lloyd of 
the Disney Channel's "Avonlea." 

"Northern Exposure" Valerie 
Mahaffey won for her supporting 
role as the hypochondriac Eve, 
while writers Andrew Schneider 
and Diane Frolov were honored for 
the script "Seoul Mates" in the 
drama about life in Alaska. 

The series also won three 
technical Emmys Saturday. 

The production team of Joshua 
Brand and John Falsey earned a 
writing Emmy for the pilot of 
NBC's "I'll Ry Away." 

The two also produce "Northern 
Exposure" and together earned 31 

■ See EMMYS page 10 



E 



SSENTIALS 



DOUBLE BARRELED 



DARVIBLAS1 




ONE DAY TO LIVE 



M MM SEQUELS: THE HOOF THAT ROCKS THE CRADLE 



THE STRIP 



DAVID SWEARINGEN 




TfUST ME, 
T5 PERFECTLY 
5AfE. 




Artesian seas 



"Day 4 — Whew, is this a man or 
what?" 

The door slowly creaks open, and quite 
an impressive sight is standing there. 
Del ilah moistens her lips and sighs heavily 
as her eyes slither up the beastoid in front 
of her, starting with his legs. Patchy, 
braided hair on the legs ... zebra-slriped 
bikini briefs ... a faded Village People 
concert-tour shirt ... and facial features that 
prove that people actually do play goalie 
in hockey without a mask. At 5 feet 10 
inches and roughly 277 kilos (about 610 
pounds), this manty man reeks of pure 
power and persuasion, and his name just 
happens to be Wolfgang. His odor is 
bellowing forth ever so gently, letting all 
within three square miles know of his 
hazardous occupation as a roadkili trapper. 

Wolfgang and Delilah have been dating 
off and on for the past four years, and now 
he announces he has a surprise. 

"Gosh no, not another 1 2 -pack of 




srsuEAumuN 



Falstaffs." moans Delilah as she holds both 
of her skinned-up knees, remembering 
what happened the last time she drank a 
1 2-pack of Falstaffs. 

"Ho ho ho no!" shouts Wolfgang 
triumphantly. "No more Greco-Roman 
wrestling. You keep cheating by rolling me 
onto my back. I just want you to meet my 
new friend." 

While listening to the beauly and the 
beast's conversation, and staring at the 
rotund person squeezing through the door. 
Sputnik suddenly gets the urge to go 
bowling. But that's another episode. 

Not only does Wolfgang walk in, but 
someone else is right behind him. The 
other person can't be seen because of 
Wolfgang's Adonis-like frame. 

Just who is this person Wolfgang 
brought over? What are Wolfgang's 
intentions? How did he track down 
Delilah? How the hell did he fit through 
the door? For answers, you know where to 
look — tomorrow's Collegian. 



CROSSWORD 



EUGENE SHEFFER 



JIM'S JOURNAL 



JIM DOCKERS 



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Hepburn 
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38 Played the 
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of dawn TURNED TESTY. 

Today's Cryptoquip clue; Z equals P 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



August 31, 1992 



9 







LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



CO, 



GET THE WORD OUT 

PUCE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN KEDZIE 103 



DAY 
DAYS 
DAYS 
DAYS 

DAYS 



20 words or less — 

each word over 20 



$5 



$.20 per word 



20 words or less — $6.25 

each word over 20 — $25 per word 

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each word over 20 — $.30 per word 

20 words or less — $8 

each word over 20 — $.35 per word 

20 words or less — $8.50 
each word over 20 — $.40 per word 
(consecutive day rate) 



HOW TO MY 

AH ttasstfred* mutt be paid m advance 
urates you have in established account 
art* Student Publlettions. 

Cash, ohickt aststerCafd or vita art 
accepted. Thtrt li • HO wnrtct charge 
on ill returned checks. 

wt Mvift in* ngrtt to sort, reject or 
property classify any ad. 

NEADIpWIcS 
For mi vttn ehwge, we'll put a 
t above vow ad to catch the 
rt attention. 



DEADLINES 

Classified Mjt mutt 6* placed Of 
noon tha day baton IK* data you want 
your ad to run. Ciaeaited dfrplty ads 
mutt be placed by 4 p.m. two working 
days prior to (ha data you want your as 
to run 

FREE FOUND ADS 

Aa a aanrica to you, wa run found adt 

(of thrat dayt tia* of charge, 



CANCELLATIONS 

H you »*>i your ham bttert your ad 
hea ttptrad, wa arid refund you lor tha 
remaining days. 

You mutt call us bafort noon tha day 
tneadwtobepubtiariad. 

CORRECTIONS 

If you find an error in your ad, 
cifl us. Wa accapt responsibility 
for tha first wrong insertion 



Call 532-6555 to place your classified. 



■ 




BULLETIN 
BOARD 



010 



Announcements 



ADVANCED FLIGHT 

Training Multi-engine, 
instrument commercial, 
ATP, CFI ratings. 
Private and instrument 
ground school 

Hugh Irvin at 539-3128 
evenings 

COME FLY with us, K-State 
Flying Club has 
five airplanes. For best 
prices call Sam 
Knipp. 539 6193 after 
5:30p.m. 

INSTRUCTOR: TEST 
preparation organiza- 
tion needs individual 
to teach GRE Prep 
program top scores 
needed Call 

(913(262-8378. 

NEEDED: THE senior in 
Architecture who 
bakes and decorates 
cakes. Please call 
for an order 587-5190 
days 494-8460 

evenings and weekend 
Tom. 

NEW INTERNATIONAL 
Youth Hostel open- 
ing between Wichita/ 
Junction City 

$7.50 night. Stone 
Prairie Inn, Marion, 
KS 66861 Reservations 
required. 
(316)382-2746 

SHYNESS WORKSHOP. It 
shyness inhibiting 
you? Five- session 
workshop will teach 
skills of overcoming 
shyness. Mondays 
330- 5pm, beginning 
September 1 4 Fee: 
S10. Call University 
Counseling Services at 
532-6927 to reserve a 
place. 

WAGON WHEEL Ant iq ues, 
409 Lincoln, Wa- 
mego. New arrivals, 
marbles and furni- 
ture, phone 456-8480 
or 494- 2388 



Lett and Found 




Found ads can be placed 
fr*a for three 



FOUND FERRET Call 537- 
6125. M.ke. Scott 
or Jeff 



Personals 




We require a form of 
picture ID IKSU or 

driver 1 ! license or o t h e r ) 
when placing • 

personal. 

HORI- LORI- Don't be sad 
that you're Only 19. 
Just think: next year 
while we're all at 
Chance, we know there 
will be at least 
one sober driver! Happy 
Birthdayl We 

love youl LMLS Xes. 
Happy ness. 
Peaches, Cream and 
Moons r. 

SBM 28, 6' 178 pounds, 
would like to meat a 
nice lady. 23 to 37 for 
romance and to- 
getherness. Reply 
Collegian Box 1 

WILLIE THE Wildcat- Thanks 
(or making 

one of my little* boy's 
dreams coma true 
You are a hero in little 
chiidrens eyes, 
when there aren't many 
heroes left. 

Thanks for taking tha 
time and realizing 




how important it was to 
himl Your big- 
gest fans on Vattier 
Street 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



105 



For Rent- 



A HOUSE with three 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 
campus Central air and 
heating $600 537-0428 

AIR CONDITIONED, very 
clean one, two, 
three-bedroom units. 
Furnished or unfur- 
nished. Quiet 
surroundings for Serous 
students Nine month 
lease available. No 
pets. 537-8389. 

CLOSE TO campus very 
nice, one. two, 
three and four- 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great prices. 

537-2919,537-1666. 

NEWLY REMODELED three- 
bedroom, two 
bath, one-half block 
from campus. No 
pets. 776-1340 

TWO- BEDROOM 

LUXURIOUS apartment 
in 

North park Apartments 
at 1200 Fremont 
near campus. Central 
air, dishwasher/ 
disposal, laundry 
facilities. 637-0428. 
537-8790. 




CLOSE TO campus very 
nice, one, two, 
three and four- 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great prices. 

537-2919, 537-1666. 

EFFICIENCY FOR two, one 
block from cam- 
pus. Washer/ dryer. 
456-2240 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath, central air, 
laundry, near campus, 
637-8800 

SPACIOUS, VERY clean rwo- 
three bedroom, 
two bath, air 
conditioned, laundry 
hook- 
ups, Waterbeds 
accepted. Quiet 
surround- 
ings for serious 
students. No pets. Also 
one 

and two bedroom units. 
537B389 

STUDIO APARTMENT, dose 
to campus. 

Call after 6p.m. 
776-672*. 

THE PERFECT roommate 
apartment, Nine 

month teases. Extra 
large two-bedroom. 
Two private baths. 
Washer and dryer in- 
cluded. Dishwasher 
Swimming pool. Pri- 
vate batcony. Immediate 
availability. Up- 
perclsssmen and 
graduate students pre- 
ferred. Call 776-664.1. 




WANT A place to live this 
school year? 

Teacher wants college 
girl to live-in. 
Routing/ meals m 
exchange for a few 
chores. Write Box 5 




A MOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 



campus Central air and 
heat-rig $500 537-0428. 

AVAILABLE SEPT. 1 four 
bedroom. Located 
1716 Poyno. Two bath, 
fireplace. wash- 
er/ dryer, yard. $620 
plus utilities, lease 
plus deposit 539-3672. 

TWO BE0R00M HOUSE. 
two and one-half 
miles from Town Center 
on Highway 24. 
776-1340. 



ForSaH- 




SAVE WITH hot water solar 
Three -bed room 
with studio apartment 
for income close 
to city park and campus. 
Good neigh- 

borhood. $62,900. 1- 
800593-0519. 



135 



FwSzlt- 



FREE AOVICE Purchase a 
mobile home. 

We finance low 
payments: two- 
bedroom, 

$14975 monthly. 
Countryside 539-2325. 



140 



For Mirf. 
Garaet 



SMALL GARAGE available 
Sept. 1 $50 a 

month, 539-5136 



145 



MALE ROOMMATE needed: 
Non-smoking 
Furnished, need bed. 
$230 a month, in- 
cludes all utilities. Leave 
message 537- 

1199. 

MALE ROOMMATE, 

graduate student, non- 
smoking to share two- 
bedroom apart- 
ments. One block to 
campus, share bath- 
room, furnished. 
Washer, dryer, $175 
plus electricity. 
776-4776. 

MALE ROOMMATES 
wanted Two- three 
rooms available. 
Bnttnay Ridge estate. 
Call 

Darin. 776-0689. Leave 
message. 

NON-SMOKING MALE to 
be fourth person in 
two bedroom 
apartment $1 20/ month 
plus one-fourth utilities. 
537-1610 

ONE FEMALE roommate 
needed imme- 

diately! Non-smoker to 
there three-bed- 
room house with two 
other girts Rent $110 
plus one-third utilities 
Just behind Rama- 
da Inn. We're waiting for 
your call 776- 
3655 

ONE FEMALE to share three- 
bedroom apart- 
ment for first semester 
Own room, wash- 
er/ dryer and pool. $1 70 
plus one third 

utilities. 537-4340 

ONE NON-SMOKING female 
roommate need- 
ed to share three- 
bedroom apartment 
dose to campus. Please 
call 776-3421 

ONE- THREE non-smoking 
females. farm- 

house, barn, pasture 
for horses, cattle, 
dogs. Prefer Veterinary, 
Animal Science, 
Horticulture majors 
Possible rent in ex- 
change for horse 
training or light cattle 
and 

hone chores. 776-1205, 
8pm- 9pm or P. 
O. Box 1211. 

ROOMMATE WANTED for 
farmhouse six 

miles from town. Horse 
facilities $125/ 

month plus utilities. 
539-2029 

ROOMMATE WANTED: One 
block from cam- 
put and Aggieville. 
$126/ month, one- 
fourth utilities, own 
bedroom in house 
with easy going guys. 
537-2055 

SERIOUS NONSMOKING 
female. Own 

room, furnished $1507 
month plus utili- 



ties. Two blocks from 
campus Leave 

message 539-7141. 

SERIOUS, NON SMOKING 
female roommate 
to share a one-bedroom 

apartment par 

iially furnished. Call 
5397586 



TWO ROOMMATES i 

One half block 

east of campus 
Upperclsssmen pre- 
ferred Call 776-7794 

WANTED FEMALE 

roommate. Close to 
cam- 
pus, Call Dawn 
587-0651 



150 



NON-SMOKING FEMALE to 
sublease two- 

bedroom apartment. 
One block from cam- 
pus. $185 plus one-tfurd 
electric/ month. 
776-9859 






SERVICE 

DIRECTOR 



210 



ABC typing service. You do 
the studying, 

let me do Ihe typing. 
Reports, charts. 
graphs, resumes and 
more. Overnight re- 
sults when necessary. 
Go ahead, give 
me a cafL 537-9480 after 
5p.m. ask for 
Jackie, 

A FIVE minute walk from 
Aggieville. Pa 

pars, letters $1.25 
double spaced. Same 
day slightly higher Ask 
about resumes. 
Call 776-1534, 

RECOGNIZE THIS7 We're 
Still here! Utilize 
my B.S. in English/ 
Speech for papers/ 
editing, my ten years 
personnel man- 
agement for resumes. 
$1 25 double: let- 
ter quality. Call Janice 
637-2203 

TYPING IN my home. 
available days and 
evenings, Gail 53&667B. 




SEWING AND alterations. 
Taireza 611 N. 
Eleventh St. 537-2128 



Child Car* 




BABYSITTING BY teacher 
and mother in her 
home 7 to 5:30 Monday 
through Friday. 
Two yeart old and up. 
Call 776-2174, 

MATURE AND experienced 
babysitter needed 
lor two great kids. 
Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday 12:30 4p,m, 
References required 
776-6486. 



240 



WANTED: ALTERNATES for 
(doo- wop) vocal 
group Need first tenor 
with high falsetto 
and low bast Perform 
around state, even- 
ings and weekends. 
Good pay. 776 4999, 
637 17*1 

YAMAHA TWO channel 

diversity wireless 

guitar system. Excellent 

condition 

Would be great for 

Opus Competition or 

touring band Call for 

details. 539-8912. 




NISSAN- OATSUN Repair 
Service 20 years 
experience Auto Craft. 
2612 Dipper Lane, 
Manhattan, Kansas. 537 
5049 8a m ■ 

5pm. Monday through 
Friday. 



255*"* 



A LITTLE extra cash for a 
chemistry text and a 
pitcher of beer. Cash 
Pawn JiGun, Inc., 
1917 Ft Riley Boulevard 

ADAMS INTERIOR, Exterior 
Painting Serv 

ice, offering quality 
service at affordable 
prices Call for a free 
estimate. Also dry- 
wall, carpenter, and 
furniture making of 
lered 776-5281 ask for 
Craig. 

HEALTH AND AutO 
Insurance. Call us be- 
fore buying the 
University Health Plan. 
Multi- line Agency- 555 
Poyntz Suite 

215 Tim Engle 
537-4661 

LOSE WEIGHT Increase 
energy 100 p«' 
cent herbal capsule 
proven to burn body 
fat. boost energy, and 
take off weight nat- 
urally. Call Julw at 539- 



F me Una Ti 
Ouastytrarx reasonably priced 

rwapriai tttreztton 
•omw an 29»i 

■Mass) 



■ 

3? 1 



EMPLOYMENT; 
CAREERS 




The Collegian cannot 
verify tha financial po- 

in the Employment 
classification, Reader* 
are advised to ap- 
proach any such 
employment opportunity 
with reasonable caution 
The Collegian 

urges our readers to 
contact the Better 
Business Bureau, 501 SC 
Jefferson, Tope 

ka, KS 66607-1190. 
(913)232-0454 

20 PEOPLE needed to help 
capitalize on tre- 
mendous market for 
Shaperite Products. 
Discover this unique 
100 percent herbal 
line that's sweeping 
america. Superb 
pay plan and 
professional training. 
For 

free sample and intro 
pack call, 

1 800 ) 7 88-67 40ext 361 . 

BAB YSTTTER NEEDED M-F. 
7:15e,m.- 

8:45a. m for 12 month 
old boy in my 

home. 776-77*8. 

CHlLDCHiLCv NANNIES east 
coast nannies. 

NY, Conn,, Long Island 
and NJ areas. 
Live-in one year 
commitment!. $1 50 and 
up per week. Immediate 
placements. In- 

terviews pltd 

applications call 
(800)858-2429 or 
1316)682-1735 

CHINESE RESTAURANT, 
kitchen help. Ex- 
perience preferred, part 
lime 539-2551 . 

CNA STONEYBROOK 
Retirement Commun- 
ity is looking for caring 
and enthusiastic 
CNA's to work full or 
part-time, evenings 
or nights. Must have 



Kansas certifica- 
tion Appry at 2025 Little 
Kitten Ave 

776-0065 EOE. 

COMPUTER SUPPORT and 
Programming po- 
sitions are available for 
K State students 
with a variety of skills 
Support Technicians 
must have good 
interpersonal skills, have 
experience with PCs 
and popular software 
packages like 

WordPerfect. Lotus. 
dBase. 

Must have a firm 
understanding of 
MSOOS, and Windows, 
and have some 
programming skills 
Software Developers 
and Network Assistants 
must have ex- 
perience with CC". 
data based man- 
agement systems (SOL 
dBase. Paradox) 
and with Novell, UNIX. 
MS DOS. and Wmd 
ows. GUI programming 
experience in X or 
Windows 3.1 is 
especially helpful 
Appl ica- 

tions will be available, 
accepted until 

9. 1 92 at 21 1 Umberger 
Hall 

MARKETING PART TIME 

Sophomore or Ju- 
nior. Marketing Major, 
15 to 20 hours per 
week, own 

transportation 
Godfather's 
Pizza call Mrs. 
Chambers 

1800)937-0112. Mon- 
Tuet.. 1- *p m 
only. 

NEW BEGINNING lingerie 
and day wear de- 
signed by Cameo. Now 
hiring $20 regis- 
tration fee, earn your 
kit also booking 
Showings Evelyn 
Willhoit 1-762-2785 

PART-TIME MANAGER- to 
hire/ train sales 
and management 
personnel Good com- 
munications skills 
required. Recorded 
message reveals details. 
537-2662 

STUDENT OFFICE assistant 
needed. 10 '5 

hours per week during 
fall and spring se- 
mesters, 30- 40 hours 
per week during the 
summer and possibly 
during school breaks 
and between semesters- 
Duties include 
word processing 
(WordPerfect), book 
keeping, answering six 
telephone lines, 
proofreading, typing. 
filing, and tome 
heavy lifting. Must be 
dependable and able 
to accurately follow 
instructions. Work 
study preferred but not 
required. Contact 
Deb at 532-5970 

WANTED RESPONSIBLE 
person with some 
experience operating a 
Power Take Off 
grinder mixer with 
some mornings avail 
able Can 1-457-3440 
before Sam. 

WCHfTA EAGLES accepting 
applications 
for daily home delivery 
carrier, Manhat- 
tan Reliable 
transportation a must 
seven mornings a week. 
Bond deposit 
required. (800)825-6397 
e xi 531 



320 



BE A friend to someone 
who needs you. Vol- 
unteer for Compeer. 
Call Pawnee Mental 
Health Services 
587*333 




The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advortt i ei n e w t s 
In the Employment 
classification. Readers 
are advised to ap- 
proach any such 
employment opportunity 
with reasonable caution. 
The Collegian 

urges our readers to 
contact the Better 
Business Bureau, 601 SE 
Jefferson, Tope- 

ka, KS 66607 1190 
191 3)232-0464 

$22. 17/ HOUR Professional 
company 
seeks students to sell 



K-STATE UNION 




PARKING 

SOUTH OF THE 
UNION 



PHONE 
532-6555 

PAX 

532-7309 



OR WRITE 

CGUEGUH CUSSIfWDS 
K -State Collegian 
Kedziertall 103 
Manhattan, itan. (56506 



OFFICE HOURS 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 

8 a.m. -5 p.m. 
(Except holidays) 



popular college 
"party" T shirts (includes 
lye dyes) 

Choose from 12 
designs. 1991-92 aver 
age $22. 17/ hour. Seles 
over twice aver- 
age first month. Orders 
shipped next 

day Work on 
consignment with no 
fi- 
nancial obligation. (Visa/ 
MC acceptedl. 

Call free anytime 
18001733-3265. 

$200- $600 weekly Assemble 
products at 

home. Easy) No selling 
You're paid di- 
rect. Fully guaranteed. 
Free informa- 

tion — 24 hour hotline 
801 379-2900. 
Copyright »KS13KDH 

ALASKA SUMMER 

employment— fisheries 
Earn $5,000 plus/ 
month. Free transpor- 
tation! Room and 
board' Over 8.000 
openings. No 

experience necessary 
Male or female For 
employment program 
call Student 

Employment Services at 



206 5*5 *155 
A5768 



ext 



ASSEMBLERS: EXCELLENT 
income, easy 

work assembling 
products at home. 
Seven day. 24-hour 
service. Information 
(5041646-1700 Dept. 
P6438 




OPEN 
MARKET 



410 



tar Sale 



AMAZING "ONE Day Diet" 
is sweeping the 
nation. Lose 16 to 20 
pounds in 30 days. 
Guaranteed! No drugs, 
no pills, no 

blenders, no hassles. 
Call 776-3656 

COBRA SOLAR stealth 
trapshooter radar de- 
tector, new, call Ryan 
■913)485-2313. 

FOR SALE: lour cubic foot 
Avanti refrigerator, 
runs beautifully, has 
never needed serv- 
ice. $80. Call 1-468-3381. 

FUTON FULL size, frame 
$90. matress $50. 
Call Martina 637-2473, 
7p.m.- 10pm, 

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS: 
Camoflage cloth- 
ing, field jackets, 
overcoats, new G.I 
boots, sleeping bags 
Also CARKARTT 
work wear Monday- 
Saturday. 9- 5. St 
Marys Surplus Sales. 
St Marys, KS. 
1-437-2734. 

PRINTER AND typewriter 
ribbons; computer 
paper, copy paper. Hull 
Business Sup- 

ply 716 N. 12th. 
Aggieville 539-1413 

SAMtCK ACOUSTIC guitar 
with case 

537-1867 ask for Dan. 

STOP BY the K State Union 
Bookstore's 
Computer Book Sale 
Aug. 31- Sept. 4 in 
the Union Courtyard. 
You'll lind savings 
of up to 50 percent of 
publishers prices 
on a large assortment 
of books. 

TOPEKA DAILY Capital 
Semester Special 776- 
1552. 

WINDOW UNIT air 
conditioners for sale. 
28.000 BTTJ $300 1 *.000 
BTU $50 

5.000 BTU. 110 volt. 
$75. 776-9089. 



415 



rtpa^HiW W 



GREEN AND white couch 
$50, two green 
swivel chairs $5 a piece 
539-6896 

NICE, COMFORTABLE 
couch, 7 feet long, 
$100 Call, leave 
message, 537-1783 or 
5326170 



435 



Computers 



386SX, VGA. two MB ram 
107 MB HD Five 
and one-fourth and 
three and one-half 
drives. Modem, mouse. 
game port, 24 
pin printer. Two year 
warranty. Software 
included I Best offer) 
539-3075 

LC MACINTOSH, color 
monitor with soft- 
ware. $1900, 539-1 127. 

MAC CLASSIC, four meg 
ram, *0 meg hard 
dnve. Styiewrtter printer. 
S1450, 
537-8990 

NOTEBOOK COMPUTER. 
Toshiba T2200SX, 
386 20MHZ. 60 MB hard 
drive, very small 
and compact, only 5 5 
pounds. Microsoft 
ball point mouse 
included. Must sell. 537- 
0468 

PC. MONOCHROME 
monitor, two floppy 
drives, 15 inch printer, 
manuals. soft- 

ware including word 
processing pro- 
gram). Excellent 
condition $400 or best 
offer 537-6867 Ask for 
John. 



445*** 



ELECTRIC GUITAR- Cast.Ua 
customized 

Jackson Chsrvel 
Humbucker pickup, 
Whammy bar, new 
GHS strings $175 Or 
best offer. Call 532-2299 
ask for Andy 



460 



Stare* 



CD PLAYER- Technics, single 
disc pro- 

grammable, remote 
compatible. $100 or 
best offer 532-2573, 
Jon. 



465 



Tickets le 



WANTED TWO Garth Brooks 
tickets. Front 

row if possible Day 
(913)491-2249. 

evening (91 3)829-41 IB 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 



510 



1978 CUTLASS Supreme 
260 V8. auto, air, 
power steering, 
maintenance log Runs 
well. $1 150 or best offer 
call 532-5600 

1964 RED Ponhac Fiero. For 
sale $4500 or 
best offer 539-8209 

1984 TEMPO two- doors. 
60.000 miles. Auto 
transmission, air 
condition, cassette, 
asking for or best offer. 
Call Clement 

537-9852 

1986 MAZDA RX-7. runs, 
drives and looks 
excellent must sell need 
cash this 

week $3800 or best oner 
537-4272. 

CHEAPI FBI/ U S seized 
1989 Mercedes 

S200, 1986 VW $50. 
1987 Mercedes 

$100. 1965 Mustang 
$50 Choose from 
thousands starting $25 
Free information 
2* hour hotline. 1801) 
379 2929 Copy- 

right number KS13KJC 

FOR SALE: 69 Chev impaia 
327 V8. auto, 
power steering. Day 
4*9-5274 ask for 
Gene. After 6p.m. 
499-5264 $800. 

PROTECT YOUR vehicle 
from the elements. 
Have your car waxed 
before winter sets 
in. Call for pricing and 
appointment 
587-0384. 

VW BUG 1975, new, rebuilt 
engine, good in 
tenor, $1350. call 
Martina 537-2473 
7p.m. - 10pm 




1990 SCHWtNN MOS Impact 
mountain bike. 

Call 539 0507 lor 
information 

1992 PARAMOUNT SR*0 
mountain bike. 

Many extras: speed o. 
climb bars, head- 
light, worth $900 plus; 
$650 Call 

776-2257. 

850 TREK, 16 inch like new, 
$300, 537 1591. 

SCHWINN TRAVELER. 12- 
speed, 20 inch 
cherry red; in such 
excellent condition, I 
must be crazy to sell it 
for $85; 

776-9021. 




Classified Director* 7 




> - 

r*0nulTKM 


MHJJJTTW 
MAM 

WWsssssV 
MUiSWI 


DMCTOKT 

a** _*\ J^ 


nvt 


sWUWsWT/ 



4 August 31, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Relief effort frustrates Florida victims 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

hundred price- gouging complaints 
had been filed with the attorney 
general's office. 

Would-be good Samaritans also 
were blamed for overloading traffic 
and communications problems. 

"People who are thinking about 
helping now should come back in 
three weeks," said Army Sgt. 1st 
Class Henry Peraza. "They're going 
to burn out and be gone when 
they're really needed." 

Hurricane Andrew, which hit 



Florida early Monday, left about 
180,000 people without shelter and 
caused damage estimated us high as 
$20 billion. Officials said at least 
63,000 homes were destroyed, and 
more than 600.000 people had no 
power. 

The hurricane was blamed for 33 
deaths in Florida, Louisiana and the 
Bahamas. 

In Louisiana, the storm caused 
some $400 million in damage. An 
estimated 8,000 homes were 
damaged or destroyed, displacing 



25.000 people. More than 63,000 
remained without power Sunday. 

Bush mobilized 19.500 U.S. 
ITOOfN to join the Florida National 
Guard. Navy ships loaded with 
2,000 tons of relief supplies were en 
route. 

Saturday. Bush said he was 
making S300 million available to 
speed delivery of services by the 
Federal Emergency Management 
Agency and the Small Business 
Administration. He also said he was 
allocating $127.2 million for 



Cut classes not as common 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 

leaving other colleges and coming 
to arts and sciences," Feyerharm 
said. "We are having problems 
finding the staffing for the classes 
we need." 

The college is having its greatest 
problems meeting student 
enrollment demands in the sciences. 
Feyerharm said there are waiting 



Emmys 
dominated 
by 'Exposure' 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 

nominations for both shows. 

ABC's "Roseanne," snubbed for 
three years, finally won an Emmy 
as Laurie Metcalf picked up a 
trophy for her role as Roseanne's 
sister. 

The prestigious Governor's 
Award went to media mogul Ted 
Turner, who owns Turner 
Broadcasting System, parent of 
Cable News Network. 

Other previously announced 
winners include six cast members 
of "The Simpsons" animated series 
for outstanding voice-overs. 



lists for several science courses. 

"Right now, students have what 
they had last year," said Feyerharm. 
"Unfortunately, things will get bad 
again if we don't get money from 
the state." 

Hall said the English department 
is not planning to reduce the 
number of class sections offered in 
the spring semester any more than 



usual. 

"There are always fewer students 
in classes in the spring, but that is 
largely due to normal attrition. 
People leave school." said Hall. 



"Hopefully, the money will stay 
with us," Feyerharm said, "but I'm 
afraid that it won't." 




• Introducing • 

"Kim"- the newest 

designer at Studio 32 with 5 
years experience is now 
offering a introductory 
special... 

50% off 



All Services thru Aug. 30 



776-8830 
Candlewood 




,MW*m 


nrm»mt»-Ap«r1— rtt-AW «■>«• ' MM 


Chi 




COLLEGIAN 


..» M 

Utc,. 

V.HC 


ClassADS 

I rtikem work for fou. 


ttlrii 


■ 1 ™..J.V.I».IM« J IhM-WhM M •»! 


«itt 



TO THE EDITOR 



Your views are important. 
The COLLEGIAN editorial 
page is an open forum for 
our readers' ideas. Please 
bring your letters to (he edi- 
tor to Kcdzie Hall 116. Let- 
ters must be signed, and the 
author must show an ID. 



J2. IMPRESSIONS 

^ HAIR DESIGN AND BODY TONING 



BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL 

$ 5otf ; 

All chemical services 
or haircut with style 

20 % otf 

! rjajlcaie^ i 

Not valid with any other offer. 



First-time Visitor Only 
1129 Moro Aggieville 537-1332 



STUDENT 
LOANS 



Yes! 



24 HR. PROCESSING MAKES IT SIMPLE! 

Let the professional in-house staff at Kansas State Bank assist 
you with your student loan and all your banking needs. 

Student Loans • Checking Accounts • 24 Hr. ATM Banking 

Lender code #821176 



Kansas State Bank 

Westloop • Downtown • Aggieville • K-State Union, 537-4400 




emergency food stamps. 

On the CBS-TV program "Face 
the Nation" Sunday. Vice President 
Dan Quayle said the federal 
government, criticized for moving 
too slowly, had done a good job. 



"It is much more severe than 
anybody had thought it was 
initially, and I would say 
considering the circumstances. 
...We've done a very good, 
commendable job." Quayle said. 



Theater renovated, reborn 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 

from the screen, making the front 
row a very usable seat," Howard 
said. 

Also, Woolery said the seating 
toward the rear of the theater will 
be staggered to improve sight lines. 

New concessions, a larger screen 
and a K-State theme design are a 
few more changes in the 
renovation. 

"The Varsity will be done in a 
K-State theme." Woolery said. 
"The theater will be done with 
purple, and professionally painted 
paw prints will be by the 



concessions and throughout the 
theater." 

Howard said he believes the 
company is making a good 
investment in Aggieville. 

"Aggieville is in the process of a 
comeback," Howard said, "and we 
hope to be a part of it as a mark for 
Aggieville as a viable business 
district." 

Aggieville Business Association 
director Cheryl Sieben said the 
businesses are excited the Varsity is 
back. She said she thinks the theater 
will perk up the east end of Moro 
Street. 



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Stop by o«r tabk in the K-State toioD and sign up for the $100 kit book scholarship raffle 

September 1 - 4, 1992 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

HK_-State Union 
Bo 



Bookstore S32 -6583 



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Cash flow analysis for in- 
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Net present value (NPV). 
Bond calculations. Depreci- 
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Also have a look at the 
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WEATHER - PAQE 2 



SEPTEMBER 1, 1992 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99, NUMBER 7 



WORLD 



Brazilian | Brooks fans don't wait in vain 

legislature 
may oust 
president 



ASSOCIATED 



BRASILIA. Brazil — The pace of 
government defections quickened and markets 
slumped Monday in a rebuke to President 
Fernando Collor de Mello. 

Sunday he announced he would not resign. 

The government's leader in the Senate. Marco 
Maciel, quit Monday. Leaders of the Liberal 
Front Party. Col lor *s main backers in the 503- 
seat Chamber of 
Deputies, said they 
would not oppose 
impeachment, which 
appears inevitable. 

An unofficial count 
showed 339 legislators 
favor impeachment — 
three more than the 
two-thirds needed, 

Collor, who in 1989 
won Brazil's first free 
presidential election 
since I960, is accused 
of receiving millions of 
dollars from a slush 
fund run by his former 
campaign treasurer, 
Paulo Cesar Farias. 

The Sao Paulo stock 
exchange was down 6.2 

percent in reaction to Collor's televised speech 
Sunday night, in which he denied charges of 
corruption and claimed to be a victim of 
persecution. 

I Ithsf reaction was overwhelmingly negative. 

"It was superficial and insufficient." said Sen. 
Mauncio Cornea of the Democratic Labor Party, 
a government ally until last week. "He didn't 
explain where the money came from. 
Resignation is the only way out." 

Jair Meneguelli. president of the leftist Central 
Workers Union, Brazil's largest labor group, said 
he was glad Collor refused to resign. 

"We want to remove him through 
impeachment, so he loses his political rights, has 
his assets frozen and is tried like a common 
thief." Meneguelli said. 

Collor's chief of staff, Jorge Bornhausen, 
negotiated an offer of a pardon and congressional 
support for five bills, including tax reform and 
port modernization, in return for Collor's 
resignation by Sept, 30. 

But presidential press spokesman Gtcvaldo 
Dias said Collor considered the proposal 
unacceptable, "You don't set a date for the 
president's resignation. That would amount to a 
coup." Dias said. 





MIKE WSLCMHAHS 

Jim Muller, assistant director of Bramlage Coliseum, gives directions to students waiting for the ticket lottery to begin Monday afternoon at Bramlage. 




Lottery lucky for all 



CRAtO HACKER. . 



Richard Lutze, (left) freshman in education, and Greg Gehrt. freshman. 
freshman in architectural engineering, celebrate Lutze's number being called.. 



All of the l.WK students 
who tried for Garth Brooks 
concert tickets at B rami age 
Coliseum Monday night got 
lucky. 

At 5:30 p.m., they began 
coming through the doors. 
Each student with a current 
fee receipt got a lottery 
ticket with a number. Then, 
the waiting began. 

Every student received a 
chance for two tickets. 
Bramlage director Charlie 
Thomas said. In the end. 
everyone's number was 
called. 



Thomas said Bramlage 
officials created the lottery 
to accommodate the 
students. There had been 
problems with long lines to 
get tickets in other cities, he 
said, and this was one way 
to prevent problems. 

"We got exactly what we 
were after We look care of 
our students with few 
complaints." Thomas said. 

Suzy Riddcr. senior in 
education, said she hoped 
she would get tickets and 
didn't sare if she had to wait 
all night. 



"We got 
exactly what 
we were 
after. We 
took care of 
our students 
with few 
complaints." 

CHARLIE THOMAS 



CAMPUS 



Lafene switches insurance companies 



tmummutumm 

Coltefian 

Lafene Student Health Center 
has changed insurance companies, 
at possibly a lower cost to students. 

For three years, the University 
health plan has been offered by 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield. This year, 
the student health committee of 
seven students and two faculty 
members chose Monumental Life 
Insurance Company because of the 
cost of the premiums. 



The claims for the plan are 
handled by G-M Underwriters. Blue 
Cross/Blue Shield's yearly costs for 
a student were S7 19.16, and this 
year their bid increased to $1,258. 
G-M Underwriters' annual 
premium for a sinele student is 
$81 2. 

Because the insurance is a group 
plan, it provides considerable 
student discounts. Lafene director 
Lannie Zweimiller said, 

"We looked at what the 



companies provided, and the casts 
and benefits seemed to fit best and 
cover the students the best," 
Zweimiller said. 

The new policy offers 100- 
percent coverage at Lafene. If the 
student docs not use Lafene because 
the service is unavailable, there is a 
$100 deductible in which the 
company pays 80 percent, and the 
subscriber pays 20-percent, up to 
$1,000. 

Zweimiller and Diane Urban. 



attorney for sludent legal services, 
both said there aren't loo many 
changes from last year's coverage. 
Several insurance companies 
submitted a bid. and the student 
committee and Student Senate 
chose the company. 

The policy has a $25 extra 
deductible to subscribers who 
choose not to use available services 
at Lafene, 

It also provides for spouses and 
■ Sec INSURANCE page 9 



NEWS DIGEST 

► ABORTION PROTESTERS FREED 



WORLD 



■■■■■BOTH 



Tajikistan comes under siege 



■ The 

opposition 
is demand- 
ing the 
resignation 
of President 
Rakhmon 
Nabiyev. 



ASSOCIATED PRESS 

MOSCOW — Hundreds of 
Tajikistan's opposition members 
surrounded the presidential palace 
Monday, took senior government 
officials hostage and demanded the 
resignation of President Rakhmon 
Nabiyev, news reports said. 

The opposition has criticized 
Nabiyev, a former Communist 
Party leader, for failing 'to stop a 
bloody tribal conflict thai rages in 
two areas of the central Asian 
republic. They also accuse him of 



failing to move quickly enough on 
democratic reforms. 

In other unrest in the former 
Soviet Union, fighters ignored a 
cease-fire agreement in the 
secessionist Abkhazia area of 
Georgia, and a prospective truce 
also appeared threatened by new 
Armenian-Azerbaijani violence 
that reportedly killed scores of 
people in Nagorno-Karabakh. 

Georgian Interior Ministry 

spokesman Vladimir Gogolashvili 

said 25 Georgian soldiers were 

■ See UNREST page 9 




HOUSTON (AP) — The 
Texas Supreme Court ordered 
the release of six anti-abortion 
protesters Monday. 

The protesters had been 
jailed for violating a judge s 
order to keep their distance 
from abortion clinics during the 
Republican National 
Convention. Operation Rescue 
founder Randall Terry was one 
of them. 

Under the order, the 



protesters must post $1 00 bond 
to be released, pending an 
appeal of the eontempt-of -court 
ruling thai sent them to jail. 

State District Judge Eileen 
O'Neill issued the restraining 
order Aug 6. She found the six 
guilty of violating her order, 
fined them $500 and jailed them 
for up to six months. They 
refused to swear not to violate 
the order, saying it infringed on 
their right to free speech. 



► IDAHO FUGITIVE SURRENDERS 



NAPLES, Idaho (AP) — A 
fugitive who held off law- 
enforcement officers for 1 1 
days at his mountain cabin 
surrendered Monday, an 
intermediary said. His son and 
wife and a U.S. marshal had 
died in shoo touts during the 
siege. 

Randy Weaver came out of 
the cabin with his three 
surviving children, said James 
•Bo" Gntz. who has been a 



liaison between Weaver and 
authorities since Friday. 
Weaver, 44, a devotee of the 
Christian Identity Movement 
that combines Old Testament, 
right -wing and white suprem- 
acist beliefs, was holed up in 
the cabin with his family since 
February 1991, when he failed 
to appear in court on a federal 
weapons charge. He sur- 
rendered after reading a note 
from supporters. Gntz said. 



► QUAYLE TO CAMPAIGN IN KC 



KANSAS CITY. Mo. (AP) — 
Vice President Dan Ouayle will 
stop in Kansas City during a 
five-state campaign trip. White 



House officials said Monday 

Ouayle is scheduled to arrive 
Tuesday night and speak at a 
luncheon Wednesday. 




2 September 1, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



it 



FYI 



Tutoring available 
in many subjects 



CoNefw 

More than 100 courses offer free 
tutoring through campus -sponsored 
programs at K State. 

Students may request tutoring 
for as many as three hours in up to 
three subjects a week. 

"If students feel like they're not 
comprehending the subject matter 
in depth or are beginning to feel 
lost in a class, then they should 
seriously look at getting a tutor," 
said Charlotte Olsen, acting director 
director of Student Support 
Services. "We encourage them to 
look prior to failures on several 
tests." 

Applications are accepted from 8 
a.m. to S p.m. at the tutoring center 
in Leisure 201. Applicants are 
screened for background 
information before they are placed 
in the program. 

"Basic things like address, 
phone number, any learning 
disabilities, if their parents received 
a degree and if they are receiving 
financial aid," said Darren Oxford, 
graduate assistant and tutoring 
center coordinator. 

"We have them fill out a 
schedule. A lot of students arc 
looking to schedule tutoring at 
some perfect time, but the more 
time someone leaves open on their 
schedule, the better chance they 
have of getting tutoring." Oxford 
said. 

Applicants are divided into two 
categories. Those with limited 
educational and economic 
backgrounds are placed into a 
program funded by the U.S. 
Department of Education. The 
others are placed in a program 
supported by the Student Governing 
Association. 

Oxford said at this time, the 



center is processing approximately 
100 applications for tutors. 

"We set up the time and the 
place and make arrangements with 
the tutor. It is our expectation that 
the student will come to each 
session," Olsen said. 

Tutoring will be available until 
shortly before finals. 

Campus tutoring covers a wide 
variety of subjects. Olsen said that 
in upper-level or specialized 
courses, a student may need to 
consult a private tutor for help. 

"Our services are geared to 
lower-level courses to allow 
students to get their feet on the 
ground," Olsen said. "College 
Algebra is one of the big ones." 

Olsen said other heavily tutored 
classes include intermediate algebra 
and lower-level physics classes. 

Private tutors charge fees, but 
cost often is negotiable. 

Chetan Shah, graduate student in 
engineering and private tutor, said 
he will charge students differently 
for assistance. 

"I don't have a set amount I 
charge," Shah said. "This is my first 
time tutoring, and what 1 charge 
will depend on the subject" 

Higher fees are charged for 
advanced level courses, or when 
intense help is needed by a student. 

Tutoring groups coordinated by 
the college usually consist of three 
to five people. Olsen said this 
small -group structure benefits the 
students because it allows them to 
work with each other. 

"We encourage students to use 
each other in a cooperative- learning 
situation." Olsen said. 

No additional tutors are needed 
for the program at this time. 

A list of private tutors is kept at 
Educational Supportive Services in 
Holton Hall and also at U-LearN. 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 



Th« Knat Stmt Cottp*" (USPS 29' OJCi i audwl nrtnotatr m K*n*u SUM Unwiitr ■ 
ltii "lutnii fi ft h mi n i inr rimn urn im Ifr niTtT rn 6*508 tt» CaMgwi 
WWHW — « Mf l dunng ttn tctvol »Mf ITS 0"t» * — fc IMmyi w tumnvtf Sacondctra 
I ii pad M Uarrunar Kan 66S02 
POSTMASTER Sana Ktms cnwig« to Kmu* SUM CoUagw Oq*kw am kmm >03 

mv«imi.ui. ■■>•?!•? 

Nm cocntoutwi* wl 0* KcaplM £>» mpftona (»i 31 532-655* at M V* Co»t»*i nmmwi. 

Ingvnn oonxmng txal nmton* w att***e t*so«r «on*»viq incuts st oVacwa so 9 ■ y 
■MM 



Introducing Verdie Knaack - Nail Technician 

Verdie is specialized in GLASS GLAZING and is 
offering a Glass Glazing Special for $38. 

Offer good until Sept. 12 
1503 TdtL GrtdSbd (kaa&dfy, Dtys /m) 

$39-62*5 



AG STUDENTS and FACULTY 

WATERMELON FEED 

and 

AG CLUB ACTIVITIES FAIR 

South lawn ^?5£*2^K Tuesday 

of i^ 

Waters Hall 

*Weber Arena in case of rain. 

Sponsored by the Ag Student Council & Alpha Zeta 
(Ail departmental clubs will be represented) 




ERADO 

ALOO! 

FREE^DANCE LESSONS 
50g DRAWS EVERY WED 
LESSONS START 7:30 

Thurs. 

$ 1 .25 LONGNECKS 

and Karaoke Contest 

Prizes 8e Giveaways 

FRI. 8e SAT. 

best live 
Entertainment 

in MIDWEST 

This Weekend 

Borderline 

131 N. Manhattan 539-025J 



POLICE REPORTS J 



KSTATE POLICE 



These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the KSU Police 
Department. Because of incomplete information in the log. not all campus 
crimes are listed here. 
MONDAY, AUGUST 31 JBMBU 

At 1:45 p.m. a lost or stolen At 3:41 p.m. a loal walls) wss 

parking permit wss reported. reported In the arcs ol Durland and 

At 2:10 p.m. s wallet containing Seaton halls. Loss wss reported st 

113 was reported lost $1 05. 




RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the Riley County 
Police Department. Because of space constraints, not all crimes appearing 
in the log are published. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 31 

At 12:08 a.m. a vehicle burglary 
wss reported at 2437 Vaughn Drive. 
Taken were golf clubs and bag valued 
at $329 

At 7:25 a.m. a vehicle burgulary 
was reported on Deep Creek Road, 
three miles east of Highway 177. 
Taken were foots, a tool box and a fire 
extinguisher. Loss wss $600. 

At 8:14 s.m s major-damage, non- 
Injury accident was reported In the 
east parking lot st 2100 Poynu Ave. 
Involved were a vehicle driven by 
Yvonne L. Tyler, 2114 Northvlew 
Drive, and parked and unattended 
vehicles owned by Clyde Scolt, 809 
Mimosa Lane, and Barbara Watt, 3211 
Shady Valley Drive. 

At 8:15 a.m. a criminal damage to 
property waa reported. Three tires 
were dsmsgsd at 723 Allison Ave., 
No. 11. Loss was $300. 

At 8:45 a.m. a theft wss reported 
from the perking lot st 820 Sunset 
Ave. A center hub of a car wheel 
cover wss taken. Loss wss $160. 

At 8:47 s.m. a vehicle burglary was 



reported at Westslde Amoco, 3001 
Anderson Ave. A rear windshield wss 
broken out, and a car stereo was 
taken. Loss wss $400 

At 9:40 s.m. s vehicle burglary wss 
reported st 417 Ninth St., Ogden, wss 
reported. A tool set wss taken. Loss 
was $82. 

At 9:50 a.m. a theft of a trailer 
hitch was reported at 40 Waterway 
Place. Loss was $60. 

At 1 1 45 s.m. s theft wss reported. 
Cassettes vslued at $90 were tsken 
from s vehicle on North Manhattan 
Ave. south of Flint Hills Place. 
Damage to the vehicle was $300. 



CAMPUS BULLETIN 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 

■ Rodeo Club executive meeting will be at 5 p.m. in Weber Block 
and Bridle Lounge. 

■ Young Democrats will meet to organize (all campaigns at 8:30 
p.m. in Union 207. 

■ Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Support and Development Group will 
have an organizational meeting from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Lalene 
238. 

■ Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity will have an informational 
meeting at 9 p.m. in Union 204. 

■ Career Planning and Placement will sponsor a job-search- 
orientation meeting at 3:30 p.m. in Union 207 tor seniors in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, and at 7 p.m. in Union Little Theatre 
for seniors in the colleges of Business, Engineering and 
Architecture. 

■ SPURS will meet from 7 to 8 p.m. in Union 207, 

■ Rainforest Coalition will meet at 7 p.m. in Union 209. 

■ Amateur Radio Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. in Union 203. 

■ The Graduate School has scheduled the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Mustapha El BouhssN for 9 a.m. in 
Waters 133. 

■ Ag Student Council and Alpha Zeta will sponsor a watermelon 
feed and ag club activities fair at 6:15 p.m. on the south lawn of 
Waters Hall. 

■ Don Baars of Kansas Geological Survey in Lawrence will 
present "Basement Tectonics of Kansas* at 4 p.m. in Thompson 
213. 

■ Hospitality Management Society will meet at 8 p.m. in the 
Justin lobby. 

■ Society for Creative Anachronism will meet at 7 p.m. on the 
east side of City Park. 

■ Pi Sigma Epsilon will meet at 5 p.m. in Calvin 209. 

■ German Club will meet at 2:30 p.m. in Union 202. New 
members welcome. 



WEATHER 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 



TODAY'S FORECAST 

I _ i Today, mostly cloudy, a 60-percent chance of showers and 

HHbbbbVI thunderstorms. High around 80 Tonight, mostly cloudy win 
I a 50-percent chance of showers and thunderstorms Low m 
^ m ^ m ^ m ^ the mid-60s. 

TOMORROW'S FORECAST 

i A 30 percent chance of thunderstorms, otherwise partly 
j cloudy. High 60 to 85. 



72/51 




EXTENDED FORECAST 



MANHATTAN 


TOPEKA 


5LAND 76/56 • 
• RUSSELL 


m 79/57 # 

KANSAS 


CITY 


82/57 


N A 


GARDEN CITY 




| 77/59 WICHITA 




9 ^ 84/59 




COFFEYV1LLE 




78/62 



WORLD TEMPERATURES 



u 



Thursday through Saturday; A chance of showers and 
thunderstorms Thursday Dry Friday and Saturday Highs in 
me mtd-70s to mtd-80s Thursday and Fnday. and m the 80s 
Saturday. Lows in the lower 50s to 60s 



CITY 

Athens 



TEMPS 

97-70 



SKY I London 
clear Moscow 



61 52 



86.68 



cloudy 



clear 



Bermuda 



87fl0 



RiO 



87/64 



dear 



Frankfurt 



6654 



Vienna 



90 68 



clear 




There^s a lot more than a great 
calculator waiting for you when 
you purchase an HP48SX or an 
HP48S between June 1, 1392, 
and October 31, 1992. \bu11 get 




a bonus hook that's good for free 
software, a free PC link cable 
and hundreds of dollars back 
on applications- like electrical 
and mechanical engineering- 
memory cards, training tools, 
games, ami HP's infrared printer. 

His a really big offer. Worth more 
than $500. And its going to 
make your HP 48 calculator even 
more valuable to you. The free 
serial cable lets you exchange 
information with your PC And 
the free software disk lets you 
enter and plot equations easily 
do 3D plotting, and analyze 
polynomials. 

C tU*l HrwtMl IVkinl I i-npuit fV.IZWQH 



Beyond all the bonuses, you'll 
have the right calculator for ' 
your most challenging classes. 
H P 48 calculators have over 
2100 built-in functions and 
offer a unique combination of 
graphics and calculus. 

Head over to the campus book- 
store now. After all, you dont 
see this kind of deal every day. 
HP calculators. The best for 
your success. 



ISk 



HEWLETT 
PACKARD 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



September 1, 1992 O 




White out 

Carl Carlson of Hatfener Paint and Decorating Co. paints one of the doors on Seaton Court Monday afternoon. 



carv ■MMMMOataafcsi 



ENVIRONMENT 



■I 



K-State professors to attend conference in Hungary 



Environmental 
issues, problems 
will be focus 



USA C OLE 



Cottefian 

Three K-St.de professors will 
forge a link between Big Eight 
universities and central European 
faculty at a conference on 
environmental problems this week 
in Budapest. Hungary. 

"We're hoping to bring together 
K-State and other Big Eight faculty 



to collaborate with central European 
faculty and other individuals 
involved in environmental 
problems," said Rick Forsyth, 
professor of landscape architecture 
and Center for Planning and Design 
Innovation director. 

Forsyth. Dennis Law, head of the 
Department of Landscape 
Architecture, and Lorn Clement, 
associate professor of landscape 
architecture, will be the only 
Americans speaking at the 
conference. 

Members of the Hungarian 



parliament, representatives of the 
Hungarian Ministry for the 
Environment, delegates from other 
countries, citizens' groups and 
Hungarian planning groups are 
expected to attend. 

The conference was the result of 
a forum on central European 
environment that the College of 
Architecture and Design sponsored 
last spring. 

Law said one of the speakers at 
that forum was from Hungary, and 
he later convinced officials in his 
country that an environmental 



workshop was needed in Hungary. 

Hungary has recently shifted 
from a centrally planned system to 
one in which more input from non- 
government agencies will be 
allowed. Non- government agencies 
will be expected to assume more 
responsibility for environmental 
planning in the future 

"While they have design skills, 
they know very little about 



marketing and how to set up a 
business," Law said. "So, we try to 
avail ourselves to them." 

The three educators will speak 
about environmental problems. 

Law said he will explain how 
Hungarians can make taws to 
counteract economic forces that 
interfere with environmental 
conservation. 

Clement said he will discuss 



ways of including nongovernment 
agencies in decisions about the 
environment, and he will suggest 
the U.S. National Environmental 
Policy Act as a framework. 

Forsyth said he will explain 
ways to seek cooperation between 
public and private U.S. funding 
agencies and central European 
agencies and facultv 



WORK SMARTER. 
NOT HARDER. 



Engineering student? 
Smart. 
Math or science 
major? Also smart. 

On tests, you probably run 
equations over again to make 
sure they're right. So you're 
working harder. 

\bu don't have to do that 
anymore. Not when you use 
the Tl-68 Advanced Scientific 
or TI-85 Graphics Calculator, 
with their last equation replay 
feature — and many other 
smart functions. 

We've spent years with 
students like you 




and educators like your profes- 
sors to develop the Tl-68 and 
the TI-85. That's why they're 
so highly recommended. 

For engineering students, the 
Tl-68 solves up to five simul- 
taneous equations, has complex 
number functions and offers 
formula programming. 

The TI-85 builds on the 
power of the Tl-68 by adding a 
wide range of graphing capabil- 
ities. Math students can handle 
calculus problems more easily. 
And technical students can see 
the functions for a better 
understanding of problems. 

The TI-85 ak handles 



complex numbers. Matrices. 
Vectors. Lists. Strings. Plus, it 
offers a powerful one-equation 
SOLVER. 

Try a Tl-68 or TI-85 at 
your local TI retailer today. 
And start working smarter. 
Instead of harder. 



O 



1 



CONTEMPORARY' BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY • TALBOT • MONET • VAN GOGH 

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PINION 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



The opinions expressed in In Our Opinion' are ttw opinions of ■ mafodty ot Edrtorial Board 
members These views do not necessarily represent tho views Ot Kansas Stale University. Student 
PuMcations inc. or the AQ MWer School of Joumafem end Mats Commuracaadna. 



Samamha Branson Enn Ferry Richard Knimk Mm Han 

EdtornCNtt Amy Co* lodellLamer TomLwttr 

. . _ Shawn Brute David Mayes Mark I 

Jared Savage Frank Ktecmann Derek Thoman David I 



Eagfcr 
I fillip. 



C*w*on Papa?d«pf Brian Andmon Jut* Long ManiGiacobe 



Columns are the opMont of 
only tw ookarwist Tnay do n« 
reaaci tie view* ot the Kensea 
StMe CoaagMn, but inroad sear a 



SEPTEMBER 1. 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




By the Collegian Editorial Board 



We all need to face the music 



THE ISSUE 

Lack of student 
support, poor 
judgment and 
strict alcohol 

restrictions 



in 

attendance for 
music acts tn 
Manhattan* 

WE SUGGEST 

Increased 
support, later 
starting times 
and loss strict 
alcohol policies 
would increase 
enthusiasm for 
both local and 
non-local music 
acts. 



Enthusiasm for music acts, local and non- 
local, has rapidly declined in Manhattan in the 
last three years. 

Last year's Welcome Back Concert 
headliner Billy Squire didn't even draw enough 
spectators for the sponsor to break even. It looked 
more like a funeral for an unpopular politician 
than a rock V roll intro to the new school year. 

This year, the same happened to the 
Romantics, who played to a largely empty 
Aggieville for AggieFest '92. 

Dread Zeppelin filled Memorial Stadium 
with only about 625 onlookers for this year's 
Welcome Back Concert. 

Once again, the sponsors took a financial hit 
on the entire affair. 

There are a number of reasons why these 
concerts failed to draw substantial numbers. 

Strict rules against alcohol is perhaps one 
main reason. Block parties along Laramie and 
Vattier streets this year drew bigger crowds than 
the musicians did, namely because they were 
allowed to consume something stronger than soda 
pop. 

Time is also another factor. 

Open air concerts must start later in the 



evening, or the fans become victims to the 
elements. Sandstone Theatre near Kansas City 
rarely begins an act until the sun is nearly down. 

Needless to say. Sandstone's attendance is 
rarely a problem. 

K-State can have successful concerts if the 
support of the students is there. When Pearl Jam 
performed in Lawrence last May, thousands 
showed up. 

If back-to-school concerts arc to be 
triumphant, sponsors must bring in acts that 
didn't reach their peaks in the mid-1970s. 

And if these more contemporary acts are 
found, they need to be scheduled to start their sets 
later in the day, avoiding the probability of people 
passing out from heat stroke. 

We are all to blame. There has been a lack of 
student support, a lack of money and a lack of 
good judgment by organizers. 

The concept of the Welcome Back Conceit 
and its purpose should be re -evaluated. 

When problems are addressed instead of 
perpetuated, then perhaps student enthusiasm for 
these concerts will revive. 

But until then, count on sliding attendance 
figures. 



Pitfalls await the loyal believers 



"Those 
disgruntled 
with 

Christianity ... 
discredit and 
mock the 
belief system 
based upon 
the 

resurrected 
Messiah." 



Christian beware! You 
tread on dangerous 
ground. The land you 
have entered is bereft of love 
for what you hold dear. This 
contentious region is not only 
a fortress of skepticism, but a 
stronghold of hostility, 
harboring all that would not 
merely question your faith, 
but destroy it. 

Our beloved K-State has 
become a testing ground for 
all who would pick up their 
cross and follow Jesus. Faith, 
particularly that of 
Christians, has become an 
object of scorn and ridicule 
for many members of the 
University community. 
Those disgruntled with 
Christianity have taken every 
opportunity to discredit and 
mock the belief system based 
upon the resurrected 
Messiah. 

Now, perhaps more than 
ever before. Christian, you 
will need to clutch fast to 
your cross, with great 
tenacity and fortitude. That 
is, of course, assuming your 
faith is one of personal 
certainty. 

The time has come to see 
to whom your faith belongs. 
Within this threatening 
environment. your 

confidence will either stand 
or fall. Here is where you 
will discover whether or not 
your faith belongs to you 
personally, or if the title 



"Christian" is merely a case 
of mistaken identity, as you 
have accepted the ideals of 
others as projected upon you 
through the years. 

No longer are 
you snuggled 
safely within the 
fold of your 
hometown 
congregation. No 
longer can you 
depend on the pat 
answers of Mom 
and Dad. The 
phrase, "we're not 
in Kansas 

anymore" can be 
applied here. You 
are a stranger in a 
strange land. 

The challenges 
you face here will 
be unlike any ever 
encountered in Sunday 
school, choir practice, church 
camp, or the Boy Scouts. 
Either you will reach a height 
of spiritual maturity never 
dreamed, or you will become 
overwhelmed to the point 
you throw down your cross 
to follow after the whimsical 
currents of the popular 
culture. 

Cleverly designed 

questions will often arise. 
Bom out of mischievousness. 
these queries are not 
questions at all. tn truth, they 
are oppositional statements 
purposed to confound you. 
Christian, fn this line of 




SCOTT 

Spradlin 



•'questioning" the goal hi to 
put you on the defensive, 
perhaps even io aggravate or 
provoke you to argue. Heed 
now if you will, 
the warning 
offered to a young 
man named 

Timothy by the 
Apostle Paul. 
"Have nothing to 
do with foolish 
and stupid 

arguments, for 
you know they 
produce 
quarrels "( 2 
Timothy 2:23). 
You. Christian, 
are not called to 
quarrel. Rather, 
you are called to 
be gentle, 

showing kindness to all. 

Persecution — however it 
is practiced — lays waiting 
for you. Especially if you, in 
any way, publicly affiliate 
with your Lord and openly 
adhere to his teachings. If 
you do as said above, you 
automatically run in conflict 
to the majority of current 
"moral thinking" at large on 
campus. You may very well 
be hated for your 
identification with Christ. 
What are you to make of all 
this negativity and hatred? 
Recall the words of Jesus 
himself. "If the world hates 
you, keep in mind that it 
hated me first. If vou 



belonged to the world, it 
would love you as its own. 
As it is, you do not belong to 
the world, but 1 h3ve chosen 
you out of the world. That it 
why the world hates 
you"(John 15:18). It should 
go without saying, "No 
servant is greater than his 
master." 

Here in this dangerous and 
hostile land you will be 
tested. Christian. Your faith 
will either stand or it will 
fall. Much of the possible 
outcomes rely on the level of 
"ownership" — on what 
level your faith belongs to 
you. Either your faith is your 
own or it is a projection of 
what others believe. Are you 
a Christian because it is the 
nice or moral thing to do? Or 
are you Christian because 
you are 100-percent 
conv inced of the work on the 

Albeit foolish to the 
world, the cross is your 
salvation. And if it yours, 
then your faith can survive 
and flourish. However, if 
Christianity is nothing more 
than dressing up for church 
on Sundays and attending 
important holiday services 
for the sake of your parents' 
expectations, or to be an 
upstanding citizen, your 
religion is fake and hollow. If 
you are of the latter, expect 
defeat, as you already walk 
in it. 



Readers Write 



p STUDENTS 



Christian groups 
produce fine people 

Editor, 

I am writing to express views 
and facts concerning our young 
people, especially of Manhattan 
schools and K-State. 

Every day, one can read of 
arrests of juveniles and even 
students for thefts, alcohol- 
related crimes, rapes, etc. But 
do we ever read of anything 
good done by any of our young 
folks? No. never! 

I am a man in my middle 80s 
and have been involved with 
young people since 1983. 
Longer than that, I've been 
involved with various Christian 
organizations headed by young 
people who spend their time not 
on the streets looking for 
trouble, but instead striving to 
make something of themselves. 
They attend classes regularly 
and use their free time studying 
or attending meetings that help 
build their character. 

Having been a K-State 
student in the early 1980s, I 
began attending a Christian 
organization called ICTHUS. 
This is the Greek word for fish, 
which is used as a Christian 
symbol. This and other campus 
Christian organizations conduct 
regular meetings for fellowship 
and Christian songs. 

Prayer, as well as Bible 
reading, is a part, and guest 
speakers and related activities 
make up the meetings. Car 
pools are formed on Sundays to 
transport students who wish to 
attend church. Tnps to Chnstian 
camps are attended by many . 

I wish to say that 1 have met 
and made friends with many of 
the finest Christian young 
people possible. 

I believe in these young 
people 100 percent, and my 
heart bleeds for those who ha ^e 
not become acquainted with and 
accepted Jesus Christ, who 
loves everyone and wants ihem 
to be good, useful citizens. 

These meetings are at 8 p.m. 
on Thursdays in the Union Little 
Theatre. The theater last 
Thursday was packed. 



R. Porter Brock 

Warton Manor 



fc- POLITICS 



Radical ideas are 
subverting country 



Editor, 

There seems to be an 
overwhelming misunder- 
standing among the staff of the 
Collegian that Republicans are 
the reason for this country's 
problems. They could be no 
more wrong. 

The leftist radicals on the 
Collegian staff are trying to 
have us believe that the 
problems with this country are 
caused by Christian morals, 
marital fidelity, respect for our 
own bodies and financial 
planning for the future. The 
truth is that the real problems 
are just the opposite. 

Unfortunately, true 



conservative values are not 
being reinforced in the 
Collegian but are being ridiculed 
and thought of as wrong among 
the editorial staff. Maybe they 
need to take a closer look at 
their own morals and realize that 
they are leading a cause not of 
improving the country, as they 
think, but are rapidly destroying 
its values. 

It is time that the liberals on 
the Collegian wake up and 
realize that their movement is 
destroying our country, not 
helping it. The majority of the 
students at K-State disagree on 
liberal views of abortion on 
demand, high taxation, gay and 
lesbian lifestyles, and other 
liberal propaganda that this 
newspaper prints daily. 

Dan Quayle hit the nail on 
the head when he spoke of 
family values. Now even the 
moderate Democrats are picking 
up on it. Why don't you start 
printing material that the 
majority of the students want to 
read, not this far- left garbage 
that you want us to believe? 

Gregory Hill 

Junior. Political science and 
economics 

► FEE PAYMENT 



Enrollment process 
needs serious rework 

Editor, 

Once again, we have all had to 
go through the dreaded process 
called fee payment. It is 
absolutely ridiculous to require 
each and every student to 
individually walk through this 
maze to pay their fees. Three full 
days are wasted while K-State 
attempts to account for all the 
students' fees. It is long past the 
time that this system be changed 

How could this be done? By 
using the mail. Many schools, 
including the University of 
Kansas, already allow students to 
send in their fees by mail and 
have found it to be successful. 
Just think of all the money that 
could be saved by not hiring those 
extra people for fee payment. 

Another improvement to the 
system would be to have the 
financial aid office communicate 
with the controller* s office so that 
those students with grants and 
loans could still take care of their 
fees through the mail. 

Currently, many students with 
grants stand in line simply to sign 
their checks over to K-State. A 
little ridiculous, huh? No. this is 
K-State. 

Forcing students to go through 
fee payment semester-after- 
semester isn't right. K-State 
should move quickly to catch up 
with the rest of the nation and 
allow fee payment through the 
mail. Not only would the students 
benefit, but so would the other 
individuals involved with this 
current mess. 

Jonathan McWhirter 
Senior/ Accounting 



Conservative changes may not be for the common good 



The possibility of George Bush 
getting axed has some political 
theorists claiming American 
conservatism is dying. 

"The End of Conservatism" (The 
New Republic. Aug. 31) by John J. 
Judis suggests the delusional but 
well -choreographed movement of 
the Reagan '80s is finished-it ran 
into '90s reality. 

Uncharacteristic chaos in the 
Republican Party has hopeful 
leftists, like Judis, crowing that the 
end is near for the "coherent 
movement" of conservatism, which 
was built in the mid-1950s by the 
likes of Barry Goldwater and 
William F. Buckley Jr. Judis, and 
undoubtedly others sensing a Bush 
defeat, are predicting a return to the 
immediate post-World War II 
period — where conservatives bore 



few similarities to the tight-knit 
Reagan years. 

After WWII, the conservatives 
were a disjointed tapestry of 
malcontents, ranging from 
relatively mainstream Ivy League 
Republicans to ultra-Right anti- 
Semites and racists worried about 
the subversion of the white race. 
Thankfully, there was little 
unification among their ranks. 

So what happens if Judis is 
right? What happens if Bush 
doesn't get a second term? 
Incidentally, I won't believe it until 
I see Clinton take the oath of office 
in January. 

To suggest that an entire political 
movement, one that has dominated 
the second half of the 20th century, 
could utterly fall apart on the basis 
of one failed leader would be rather 



presumptuous. 
Remember, these people 
survived Spiroand Tricky 
Dick. 

History has taught that 
it would be foolish to 
assume conservatism, a 
philosophy held by a 
majority of Americans, 
could dissipate overnight 
and be replaced with a 
new tolerance and 
understanding for liberal 
thinking. Any prediction 
like that is analogous to 
rosy first-glance notions 
that a collapsing Soviet 
Union surely precluded an 
immediate New World Golden Age. 

But there may be some truth to 
the suggestion that a Bush defeat 
would bring change in the 




MARK 

Engler 



conservative 
philosophy. However. 
those changes may not 
all be positive moves 
toward freer and more 
just -democracy. 

Revolutionaries 
and Reactionaries 
preach to empty 
auditoriums when a 

society experiences 

success. 
By 

token, 



the 



same 
those 
disorganized racist, 
paranoid, and anti- 
democratic ideas 
floating around in the late '40s and 
early '50s had a pretty heavy lid on 
top of them. Though experiencing 
rising fears regarding Communism. 
Americans were enjoying an 



economic dominance of the world 
unprecedented by any power in 
history. 

The victories of the war were 
paying off in magnificent 
dividends. Few Americans 
embraced Reactionary rhetoric — 
they were too busy being 
successful. 

The same is certainly not true 
today 

This country is now plagued by 
educational, social, and economic 
decay. There is no longer a sense 
that the fruit of tomorrow is as 
limitless as the imagination of 
today. 

In this age, Americans more 
often fear a layoff than expect a 
raise from their employers — 
definitely a far cry from the post- 
war feeling of omnipotence. 



What is more, today's 
disenchanted Americans, especially 
hard-core conservatives, often 
exhibit xenophobic tendencies and 
seek refuge in the logic of racists 
and hayseed religious leaders (Bill 
Buckley phraseology, not mine) to 
attach fathomable reason to their 
d isappo i ntments. 

So the question is not whether 
mainstream America will move Left 
in the event of a Bush defeat. 
Unless there is some unification of 
Liberal causes, it will not. 

The real question will be 
whether it will hold a central course 
in the face of Right-wing 
demagogues who. in the spirit of 
preserving America's traditional 
ethnic and moral fiber, will likely 
tumble out of the woodwork if 
Clinton wins. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



September 1, 1092 E 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



•I' 






University schedules series 
of lectures for this y ear 



■VTHBCCHIKOUMTAfr 

Four Convocation Lectures and 
three I and on Lectures have been 
scheduled for this year. 

The Convocation and Landon 
lecture series are designed to 
provide different topics of interest 
for students. 

"I think a university education 
should be a time for students to 
look into a wide variety of aspects 
of life," said Eugene Kremer, 
professor of architecture. 

Convocation Lecture Series 
speakers are chosen by a committee 
of students, faculty and area 
citizens. 

One speaker each is chosen to 
represent the four areas of interest: 
arts and humanity, public policy, 
human rights, and science and 
technology. 

The group has to consider other 
University activities when choosing 
a date, as well as the funds 
available. 

Kremer said the provost 
allocates $18,000, providing for 
travel expenses, boarding and 
publicity material. 



The Convocation Lecture Series 
begins Oct. 7 with Harm J. de Blij. 
a South African geographer. De Blij 
was ABC News* geography 
consultant during coverage of the 
Persian Gulf War. 

Carl Wunsch, scientist from 
MIT's Department of Earth, will 
speak Oct. 27 about the ocean's 
shifting currents and changing 
climates. 

Sound choreography will be 
Joan Tower's topic April 23. Tower 
is composer and bead of the music 
department at Bard College. New 
York. 

The fourth Convocation Lecture 
has not been confirmed, but it is 
scheduled during Martin Luther 
King Jr. week. 

Landon Lectures honor the 
memory of former Kansas Gov. Alf 
Landon. Ninety-one lectures have 
been since the the first in 1966. 

Lamar Alexander, U.S. secretary 
of education since 1991, will open 
the series Oct. 7. 

National Endowment for the 
Humanities director Lynne Cheney 
will speak Oct. 30. 

CNN's Bernard Shaw will offer 



UPCOMING 
LECTURES 

LANDON LECTURES 

■ Lamar Alexander, Sec. ot 
Education — Oct. 7 

■ Lynne Cheney. Director of the 
National Endowment for the 
Humanities — Oct. 30 

■ Bernard Shaw, CNN anchor 
— Nov. 20 

CONVOCATION LECTURES 

■ Harm J. de Blij, South African 
geographer — Oct. 7 

■ Carl Wunsch, scientist from 
MIT Department of Earth — 
Oct. 27 

■ Joan Tower, composer and 
professor at Bare) College, 
NY. — April 23 

■ Unconfirmed, scheduled for 
Jan 21 during Martin Luther 
King week 



MANHATTAN 



a post -presidential election analysis 
Nov. 20. Shaw was one of three 
CNN reporters who covered the 
first night of bombing in Baghdad 
during Operation Desert Storm. 

All Landon Lectures are free and 
take place in McCain Auditorium. 



Baby boom aids Sunset Zoo expansion 



CoHejar 

New arrivals flooded 
Manhattan's Sunset Zoo this 
summer as the red panda, binturong 
and colobus monkey gave birth. 
The arrival of two cheetahs is 
expected soon. 

Two red panda cubs were bom 
June 6, exactly one year after 
Sunset Zoo's two-year-old female. 
Christmas, arrived in Manhattan. 

"Ironically, June 6 is National 
Conservation Day." said Angela 
Baier, marketing and development 
officer. 

The births are the first for the red 
panda at Sunset and in Kansas. 
Sunset is the only Kansas zoo that 
has red pandas. Baier said. 



Sunset will also soon be the only 
place in Kansas to find cheetahs. A 
ground-breaking ceremony on 
Labor Day will open the cheetah 
exhibit, which will be completed in 
the fall, Baier said. 

Mike Quick, general curator, 
said the cheetahs were acquired for 
the zoo through membership in the 
Species Survival Plan. 

"SSP manages cheetahs as a 
whole papulation. Our two males 
will actually be the property of all 
zoos in the United States," Quick 
said. 

Sunset will act as a holding 
facility for two male cheetahs that 
were born in Columbus, Ohio, 
Quick said. 

"Zoos are running out of room, 
so we really need to save the habitat 



of these animals." Baier said. 

Baier credits the zoo's expansion 
to the $2 gate fee that was 
implemented in July 1989 and to 
the growth in public support. 

She said attendance is up and 
predicts that last year's number of 
52,000 visitors will be matched by 
the end of August this year. 

"Many people who hadn't seen 
the zoo for several years came out 
to see the white alligator, and saw 
all the changes and became 
interested in the whole zoo," Baier 
said. "It's a great place for a first 
date." 

Baier was also quick to point out 
that more than 70 percent of 
Sunset's visitors were from out of 
town. 




Acacia-Sept. 8 
Alpha Chi Omega-Sept. 8-9 
Alpha Delta Pi-Sept. 9-10 
Alpha Gamma Rho-Sept. 10-1 1 
Alpha Kappa Alpha-Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Kappa Lambda-Sept. 1 1 
Alpha Phi Alpha-Sept. 11 
Alpha Tau Omega- Sept. 14 
Alpha Xi Delta-Sept. 14-15 
Beta Sigma Psi-SepL 15 
Beta Theta Pi-Sept. 15-16 
Chi Omega-Sept. 16-17 
Delta Delta Delta-Sept. 17-18 
Delta Sigma Phi-Sept. 18 
Delta Sigma Theta-Sept. 1 8 
Delta Tau Delta-Sept. 21 
Delta Upsilon-Sept. 2 1 
FarmHousc-Sept. 21 
Gamma Phi Beta- Sept. 2 1 -22 
Kappa Alpha Psi-Sept. 22 
Kappa Alpha Theta-Sept. 22-23 
Kappa Delta- Sept. 23-24 
Kappa Kappa Gamma- Sept. 24-25 
Kappa Sigma-Scpr. 25 
Lambda Chi Alpha-Sept. 25 
Omega Psi Phi-Sept. 28 
Phi Beta Sigma-Sept. 28 
Phi Delta Theta-Sept. 28 
Phi Gamma Delta-Sept. 29 
Phi Kappa Tau-Sept. 29 



Phi Kappa Theta-Sept. 29 
Pi Beta Phi-Sept. 29-30 
Pi Kappa Alpha-Sept. 30 
Pi Kappa Phi-Sept. 30 
Pi Kappa Theta-Sept. 30-Oa. 1 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon-Oct. 1 
Sigma Chi-Oct. 1 
Sigma Gamma Rhe-Oet. 1-2 
Sigma Kappa-Oct, 5-6 
Sigma Nu-Ott. 6 
Sigma Phi Epsilon-Oct. 6 
Sigma Sigma Sigma-Oct. 7-8 
Tau Kappa Epsilon-Oct. 8 
Theta Xi-Oct. 8 
Triangle-Oct. 9 
Zcta Phi Beta-Oct. 9 
Boyd-Oct. 9 
Ciovia-Oci. 12 
Edwards-Oct. 12 
Ford-Oct 12 
Goodnow-Oct. 13 
Haymaker-Occ, 13 
Marlatt-Oct. 13 
Moore-Oct, 14 
Putnam-Oct. 14 
Smith-Oct. 15 
Smurthwaitc-Oct. 15 
Van Zile-Oct. 15 
Wcst-Oct. 15 
OffCampus-Oct. 16-30 



Picture yourself in the 1993 
Royal Purple yearbook. 



Photos will be taken from 8:30 
a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. 
in the K-State Union Room 209. 



If you are a greek member, but 
live in a residence hall or off 
campus, please have your photo 
taken with your fraternity or so- 
rority. 



Stay in shape without getting bored! 



For over 1 ,0OO years, the martial arts have 
been helping people stay in shape through 
a unique blend of stretching, cardiovascular 
conditioning, and fun. The martial arts are 
the best way to help you stay in shape. 




Our programs include: 

Ik/Great stretches to maintain and 
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r JfFun cardiovascular workouts to 
improve your fitness and stamina. 

^Relaxation techniques to reduce you 
of stress. 

(^Drills to improve your balance, 
coordination and self control. 

EB'Self defense skills. 



Come in today and find out how 
good a martial arts program can 
make you feel! 



, 



I^TaeKwonDo 

£j Hapkido 
t^Judo 



Call 776-4040 Today 



The Korean Martial Arts & Fitness Center 
1118 Moro 



FALL 1992 CLOSED CLASS LIST 



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6 




PORTS 



SEPTEMBER 1, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



COLUMN 



Paintball 
was a 
good time 

Here are some thoughts and feelings on my 
first experience of paintball, a game in which you 
work with a team to eliminate the opposing side 
with pump and semi-automatic paint guns. 

Feeling No. 1: "Come on, you wiener!" 

This comes from my mouth as I try to avoid 
extinction. I'm ready to cuss him, but 1 don't 
want to draw attention to where t am. 

He had eliminated three people on my team 
before he found me. He shot at me and missed. 
Now, I'm upset. 

I was trying to flush, 
him out after he had 
followed me from forest to 
pasture land. 

He didn't know I had 
two members on my team 
in some shrubbery. 

For a little bit. I wasn't 
sure if it was him or not. 
He didn't identify himself 
as being on my team. 

I shoot, and he shoots; 

we both miss. Out come 

BRIAN 

Anderson 




my mates semi- 
automatics to rock his 
world. 



sani 



1 get hit in this game. 
I call myself out, 
although the ball doesn't leave its mark on my 
fatigues. 

Feeling No. 2: "This is just a game, dude." 

Years of football, basketball, baseball, 
swimming and golf didn't prepare me for 
paintball. 

It's son of like playing tag, but you crawl 
around to avoid being "touched." 

I had my pump gun and 100 balls. Two teams 
were set up with 12 or so men. The only 
markings identifying the teams were red and blue 
armbands. 

Once Krazy Kris sounded off the horn, and the 
armies rammed into one another, I don't know 
why, but one guy just kept running while his 
semi-automatic shot toward anything that moved. 
He got one man before he was pelted. 

I should have gotten a hunting license in my 
younger days. At least I would know how to hit 
something on the move as 1 lay in this ditch. 

I should have gotten my license from Jack 
Lacey, the former secretary of the Kansas 
Wildlife and Parks Commission, who handed 
them out like they were going out of style. 

One ball grazed my shoulder blade, and I 
called myself out. The ball didn't leave a mark, 
but ooe ball hit the team's youngster on the face 
mask, leaving orange paint around his mouth and 
chin. 

He was a little stunned. 

Eventually, he got cleaned off to get 
eliminated a couple more times in the day. 
Instead of eating lead, he swallowed paint. 

Feeling No. 3: "Wow. what a sport " 




CHAM HACXBm.Cv>6 9 ar\ 



Band ball 

Brian Goetz, sophomore undecided, loses a pass due to pressure from Jim Sommerfieid, freshman in finance, Sunday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. Goetz and 
Sommerf lekJ were participating in a traditional Sunday afternoon band football game. 



SPORTS DIGEST 



► FORMER WILDCATS CUT ►ATHLETICS TRADE CANSECO ► RIGGINS NOT GUILTY OF DUI 



The final cuts of the National Football League 
were made Monday, and only two of the five former 
Wildcats involved survived 

Russ Campbell of the Pittsburgh Stealers was 
kept as a part of trie final 47 RogencK Green, 
drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, also made 
the squad even though he had limited playing time 
in trie preseason. He dislocated his elbow in trie 
first game and is out indefinitely. 

Elijah Alexander, who also tried out wttri the 
Bucs. was one of the final 1 3 players released 
Monday 

Michael Smith, who was not drafted but tried out 
as a free agent, was cut by the Kansas City Chiefs 
last week. 

William Price was cut last Tuesday when 
squads were reduced to 60. 



OAKLAND. Calif (AP) — Trie Oakland Athletes, 
in a shocking move Monday night, traded slugger 
Jose Canseco to trie Texas Rangers for outfielder 
Ruben Sierra, pitcher Bobby Witt, reliever Jeff 
Russell and cash. 

Canseco, a two-time Amencan League home- 
run champion, was hitting 246 this season with 22 
homers and 72 RBIs 

Canseco, 28. played right field in the top of the 
first inning against the Baltimore Orioles and was in 
the on-deck cirde in trie bottom of the inning when 
he was called back by manager Tony La Russa 
and was told of trie trade. 

He then cleaned out his locker at the Oakland 
Coliseum and sat in the locker room tor several 
minutes in stunned disbelief. 



ARLINGTON, Va (AP) — Hall of Fame running 
back John Riggins was cleared on Monday of a 
charge of driving under the influence of alcohol. 

Arlington General District Court Eleanor Dobson 
ruled that Riggins' dnving was not bad enough for 
him to be stopped along Interstate 66 early on the 
morning on May 5. 

Riggins, who lives in Chantilly. Va., was able to 
say the alphabet and count backwards during a 
field sobriety test, according to testimony at a 
motions hearing A state trooper testified that 
Riggins' vehicle was going 10 miles-an-hour slower 
than the speed limit and his car had touched the 
white line several times. 

Riggins, the sixth all-time rusher in NFL history 
with 1 1 ,352 yards, was drafted by the New York 
Jets out of Kansas in 1971 . 



But who will pilot the ship, Captain Bill? 



"Competition 
breeds better 
athletes, but 
as soon as we 
are off the 
field, we're 
friends." 

JASON SMARG1ASSO 




With more than two weeks to go, 

the question of who will QB is up in the air 



Quarterback Jason Smargiasso looks for running room 

competing with Matt Garber for the starting position on this year's 



DAW MUVmSCotopan 

during a horn* gam* last season. Smargiasso It 
roster. 



CoHefiw 

First it was Carl Straw vs. Paul 
Watson. 

Last year. Watson vs. Jason 
Smargiasso. 

Now. it's Smargiasso vs. Matt 
Garber. 

It's been the same game for the 
last few seasons. At the beginning 
of the K -State football team's fall 
camp, the question of who will 
throw the first pass of the season 
again.".: Montana Sept. 19 was still 
open. And none of the actors 
involved in the opening act know 
for sure who will be the hero in the 
last act of the play. 

"Right now. both Jason and Matt 
are our No. I quarterbacks going in 
the fall camp." said Del Miller. 
assistant coach and the quarterback 
offensive coordinator. "We'll wait 
for the fall camp and see who is 
surfacing as No. 1. But up to now 
we have no indication." 

Coach Bill Snyder said he also is 
looking on a dead-tied race, hoping 
one of the two candidates will step 
up another level to claim the 
starting position. 

"I'd tike to solve the situation as 
soon as possible." he said. "If it 
takes five days, it takes five days. If 
two weeks, then two weeks. If two 
months, then two months." 

Garber and Smargiasso said they 
are ready for the bartlc: however, it 



is not a fight between two bitter 
foes. 

"We're fnends," said Garber, a 
senior. "It's not that I wait for him 
to make a mistake or he waits for 
me to make a mistake. I want to be 
No. I, but I'm also confident both 
of us can do the job." 

"We're real buddies. He helps 
me out. I help him out." said 
Smargiasso, who last year, as a 
sophomore, was quarterback No. 2 
behind Watson. 

"With the snap of the helmet on 
the field, it's all competition. 
Competition breeds better athletes, 
but as soon as we are off the field 
we're friends," Smargiasso said. 

The advantage of having two 
players competing for so long is 
that both players lift each other in 
their performances. Spring practice 
was the best proof. 

"I'm really pleased with the 
progress that they did. Both had a 
good summer." Snyder said. 

Miller said. "Both young guys 
did a big step forward in spring 
game. Both are on a higher level, 
and 1 have confidence in both to 
start." 

Smargiasso. who appeared in 
seven games last year and 
completed 12 of 34 passes for 163 
yards, has advantages in his athletic 
abilities with his strong arm and 
speed. Smargiasso said one of his 
advantages is having experienced 
the same situation last year. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



September 1, 1092 7 



:i 



; 



CAMPUS 



mamm 



Kansan's legacy lives on in Huck Boyd Institute 



Rural affairs, 
journalism are 

focus of 3 projects 



Cofcjun 

K-Staic's Huck Boyd Institute 
serves Kansas and responds to its 
needs. 

The institute, founded in April 
1990, is an extension of the Huck 
Boyd Foundation of Phillipsburg. 

Huck Boyd was the son of 
Mamie Alexander Boyd, for whom 
Boyd Hall is named. 

Huck Boyd attended K Nunc and 
spent his career as a newspaper 
publisher in north central Kansas. 
He was active in community affairs 
and worked his way up through 
state and national politics. 

Boyd was Kansas* Republican 
National Committee representative 
for 20 years, and in national circles 
he was known as an advocate for 
rural people and rural states like 
Kansas. 

When he died in 1987, a 
foundation was established to cany 
on his legacy of rural service. The 
institute was born out of this 
foundation. 

The Boyd family has been 



serving Kansas for many 
generations in agriculture, rural 
affairs and Republican committees, 
said K-Statc President Jon We f aid. 
a member of the institute's board of 
directors. 

"We felt the Huck Boyd Institute 
would be compatible at a land-grant 
university with a mission to 
promote agriculture and rural 
development," Wefald said. 

The Institute sponsors three main 
projects. 

The Huck Boyd National Center 
for Community Media, located in 
the A. Q. Miller School of 
Journalism and Mass 

Communications, provides help to 
community newspapers, small- 
market radio stations and rural 
cable TV companies. It also docs 
research in other community media. 

"We think it's very appropriate 
that the Huck Boyd National Center 
for Community Media be located at 
K-State," Director Ron Wilson said 



"Journalism was Huck Boyd's 
life's work, and it's appropriate the 
center be named in his honor and be 
located at K-State, which has a 
mission to serve all of Kansas," he 
said. 

The center has temporary media 
workers who can take over for a 
professional in an emergency or 
when that person hasn't been able 
to get away from his or her job for a 
long time. 

The editor of the Wamego Times 
hadn't had a week's vacation in 1 1 
years until the center took over the 
paper for a week this summer. 
Executive Director John Neibcrgall 
said. 

The center is planning an 
information clearinghouse (hat 
publishers and radio station 
managers can call with questions 
about their businesses. 

Neibcrgall said the information 
house will be able to give them 
answers, or at least a database that 



will offer guidance. 

"There are so many 
opportunities and needs to serve a 
community like this." Ncibergall 
said. "There's not another center 
like this one." 

Ncibergall said Rep. Pat Roberts 
and Sens. Nancy Kassehaum and 
Bob Dole, all R Kan., have 
supported the center. 

It is run by part-time and 
volunteer help. Ncibergall said, but 
by July 1993 it should be in full 
operation. 

The institute also runs the Huck 
Boyd National Institute for Rural 



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Development. Wilson said it does 
policy studies related to rural issues 
and is an outreach program to 
encourage and support rural 
community leaders. 

It is also working on a multi- 
county cooperative that shows how 
rural counties can cooperate and 
share services more efficiently. 

Wilson said the program is 
visiting communities and has a 
radio program called "Kansas 
Profile" that discusses rural 
Kansans who are innovative or 
entrepreneurial. 

The third project is the 



Lonstruction of a community 
building in Boyd's hometown of 
Phillipsburg. 

"The support we've had at K- 
Siate has been tremendous. We 
opened our doors in April 1990, just 
over two years of operation," 
Wilson said. "The networks on 
campus and the many other 
programs that support people on the 
K-State campus have been great to 
work with." 




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• Repair service available y^. 

Olson Shoe Service 
Aggieville 

539-8571 



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Aug. 21 -Sept. 14,1992' 

Gallery Hours 8 a.m. -5 |i.m. 

Week Days 

Sponsored by tin* 

I V|ur tiiH-nt Of Art 



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Q September 1, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






COMING SOON 



Def Leppard concert could 
prove to be 'adrenalized' 



TOtiYA, 



Collegian 

Dcf Leppard will return to 
Manhattan Sept. 2. 

The concert is a step on a 
promotional tour for Def Leopard's 
latest album, "Adrenalize." 

"Adrenalize" is the group's third 
album since 1983. when 
"Pyrotnania" sold eight million 
copies. 

It has been five years since the 
group's last album, "Hysteria," 
which sold 15 million copies. One 
stop on Def Leppard's 1987-88 
"Hysteria" tour was a sold-out 
crowd in Manhattan. 

"Hysteria" also brought a 
definite change in Def Leppard's 
stage. 

For the first time, the group 
performed in the round, which 
means there was not a bad seat in 
the house. The band has continued 
that style of performance to ensure 
fans' satisfaction. 

Dcf Leppard is meticulous, not 
only on the road, but in the studio 
as well, taking three years to perfect 
"Adrcnalize." The band is known to 
record and re-record until work 
meets strict standards. 

"That's the beauty of spending 
so much time making a record," 
said lead singer Joe Elliot in a press 
release. "You can come back to 
something four months later and 
say, 'That's horrible.' But with 
most people, that's already in the 
shops." 

Def Leppard's latest album. 



They put on 
a hell of a 
snow. ■■■ 
Anybody 
who likes 
rock music 
won't be 
dis- 
appointed." 

JASON MILES 



more than any other, has been a 
group effort. Producer Robert John 
"Mutt" Lange has been absent. 
Lange was working with Bryan 
Adams at the time, and the group 
did not want 
to wait. 

His was 
not a 

complete 
absence, as 
Lange co- 
wrote most 
of the songs 
and is named 
executive 
producer on 
the album. 

The 
inability to 
work with 
Lange was a 
minor setback compared to the 
death of guitarist Steve Clark in 
January 1991. 

According to reports, Clark's 
death was the result of accidentally 
combining alcohol, an ti -depressants 
and painkillers he had been taking 
after cracking three ribs in fall 
1990. 

In March 1991. Def Leppard 
continued working on the album. 
The group received help from Phil 
Collen, who stepped up from his 
role as back-up guitarist, and 
newcomer Vivian Campbell. 

"Adrenalize" was released last 
March. 

Ticket sales for the Bramlage 
Coliseum show are going slow, said 



Charlie Thomas, director of 
Bramlage. 

"ll is a good show and is doing 
well, but here, it's not selling as 
well as we had hoped," Thomas 
said. 

Bramlage. along with 
Contemporary Productions of St. 
Louis, has been righting to get them 
back. Thomas said, 

Manhaltan is the only Kansas 
date on the "Adrenalize" tour. 

"These guys are a class act." 
Thomas said. "There is nothing 
offensive about them." 

Thomas said it would have been 
even more of a challenge to get the 
group if there were not dedicated 
people at Bramlage. 

"Our students do a good job." 
Thomas said. 

Jason Miles was a runner for Def 
Leppard during the group's last 
performance in Manhattan. The 
runner's job is to work with the 
needs of the band and the 
management. 

"I had a blast working for them. 
They put on a hell of a show." 
Miles said. 

Judging from the last show and 
the group's stage setup. Def 
Leppard looks to be a good time. 

"Anybody who likes rock music 
won't be disappointed," Miles said. 



VIDEO REVIEW 



by MEGANNE MOORE 



► FINAL ANALYSIS 



Always remember not to mix violets, lilies and 
carnations. It could be a deadly combination. 

In "Final Analysis," Richard Gere portrays 
psychiatrist Issac Barr, who treats Diane (Uma 
Thurman) for her psychotic behavior. She hints 
that her behavior is related to the symbolism of 
certain flowers. 

Enter Diane's sister. Heather (Kim Bastnger). 
She meets with Barr. tells him a little family 
history. They have a little coffee, a little sex. and 
boom, they're in love. Try to explain this to her 
gangster ex-husband, with whom she is still 
required to live. 



► LAWNMOWER MAN 



Virtual Reality, a computer-generated artificial 
world, is introduced in "Lawnmower Man." a 
movie based on the story by Stephen King. 

Pierce Brosnan stars as Dr. Larry Angelo in 
this thriller about the lawnmower man, Jobc 
Smith ( Jeff Fahey). 

Jobe is slightly mentally retarded, and after 
many treatments in virtual reality, he acquires and 
retains targe amounts of information. 

Angelo discovers, after several treatments of 
mind-altering drugs and virtual reality, that Jobe's 
learning is greatly accelerated. 

Jobe experiences a mind change, as well as a 



Basinger's past acting experience is limited, 
but her character does a good job of manipulating 
Barr. He believes he has met his mate, when in 
actuality he has met a match. She uses him in 
setting up the murder of her ex- husband. 

Gere isn't convincing as the ideal psychiatrist, 
but Thurman' s character is entertaining as she 
becomes stronger and less in the shadow of her 
controlling sibling. 

Director Phil Joanou (U2's "Rattle and Hum) 
does a wonderful job of keeping the suspense 
thriller of betrayal and suspicious behavior. 



lifestyle change. He goes from being an overall- 
clad lawn man to a more intelligent man who 
dresses in boots and Wranglers. 

He realizes the obscure effect the treatments 
are having on him when he begins experiencing 
delusions and psychic effects. 

At this point, the movie becomes less 
believable and more like a Nintendo game. It's a 
good movie to see if you have no idea what 
virtual reality is. 

But, toward the end, the director goes berserk 
with special effects trying to show how drugs and 
virtual reality have damaged Jobe's brain. 



WTataTtpsI 

IINtil IUTI 

COLLEGIAN 



KSU THEATRE 
1992-93 Season 



<J| 



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3615Claflin 776-6060 

SPECIAL STUDENT MEMBERSHIP 



*indoor tennis 
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TONIGHT AND 

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KANU9Q5FM 



CELEBRATES YOU! 

Join KANU 90.5 FM classical and jazz announcers and Claflin 

Books and Copies for complimentary wine and cheese 

in celebration of your support of public radio. 

Thursday, September 3, 
5-7 p.m. 

FirstBank Center 1 81 4 Claflin Rd. Manhattan 

Bring a friend to the celebration! 

Register to win a door prize in our drawing. 



DRUMMER 
AUDITIONS 

af* 



K-STATE SINGERS 
info: McCain 229 




Prelude to a Kiss 
Feb. 11-13. 17-20 
Nichols 

Spring Dance '93 
Apr. 1 & 2 
McCain Aud. 



The Best Little Whorehouse 
in Texas 

Oct. J 5- 17 McCain Aud. 

Our Country's Good 
Nov. 1214. 18-21 Nichols 

Winter Dance '92 
Dec. 3-5 Nichols 

Martha (The Fair at Richmond) 
Mar. 4-6 
McCain Aud. 

Hamlet 

Apr. 15-17.21-24 

Nichols 



Subscription Tickets Now On Sale! 
Save 25% off regular ticket prices. 

To order: Call McCain Box Office at 532-6428 
Visa and Mastercard accepted. 

For a season brochure call 532-6875 

Students/Seniors $28 General $38 



This coupon good for 

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Dine-in & carryout 

Not valid with any other specials, 

coupons, or on deliveries. 




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537-0886 

11 a.m.-l a.m. 
7 days a week 



FREE DELIVERY MENU 

(Minimum order $9) 
Expires 9/8/92 



Interested in Rugby? 

Table in the Union 

Aug. 31, Sept. 1&2 

Mon.-Wed. 9-4 p.m. 
Or call 539-0507 

KANSAS STATE RUGBY 



COMING 

EVENTS 





Skydive? 

You bet! 

Learn how with the 
K-State Parachute Club 



General Information 
Meeting 

7 p.m. Wednesday 
Sept. 2 Union 212 



FIRST JUMP CLASSES 

Sept. 11-12 
Sept. 18-19 
Sept. 25-26 

For more information /to reserve 
guaranteed seat 

Call 776-3078 



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LOANS 

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111 



The Incomparable Red Stan 

Red Army Choms and Dance Ensemble 

Sunday, September 13, 3 p.m.* t 
The Russians are coming? Moscow sends Manhattan a 
company of I XI tor a Concert of traditional songs, folk 
dances, and martial and classical musk. Don't mist thai 
group') first North American tour. 

Ticket* $T0-$25 

Marcus Roberts and Ellis Marsalis 

Duo pianist* 

Friday, September IS, S p.m. f 

Two i>u stars take center stage for an evening of 

improvisation inspired by greats like Ellington, Monk, 

and Jelly Roll Morton 

Tickets: $7 .50- 1 15 



Danza Azteca de Anahuac 

A "Music of the Americas' production of the 

Santa F* CKunber Musk Festival 

Sunday, Se p te m ber 27, 3 p.m.* 

Witness a lire dance performed on glowing coals and 

the fascinating ceremonial dances of the Aztecs. Mayas, 

and Toilers 




Tickets S7S14. 



Lend Me a Tenor 

Friday. October 13. • p.m.* 

Sneak behind the scenes of a gala opera for an evening 
of Man Brothers- style shenanigans The laughter ia 
nonstop in this outrageous Tony A ward -winning farce 




Tickets $7-Jtfl 



Call 532-6428 or come to the McCain box office 

on the Kansas State University campus, Manhattan. 

Bon office hours: noon lo S p.m. weekdays, from I p.m. before weekend matinees, 
from 3 p.tn before weekend evenings Tickets also available (with service charge) at 
Manhattan Town Center Customer Service Desk, K -State Union Bookstore, and 1TR 
(Fort Riley) Persons with disabilities call $32-6428 



• l-mrnird in part by Ihr Kama* Arts 
mrnt fur th» Alt*, a federal agency 

t Corporate support has been provided bv Union National Bank and Trust Co. 
1 Supported try the Jeanne Weill Durte* Memorial Fund 
All performance* aie supported by the K-Staar Fsw Art, Fee 



M-C-C-A-I-N 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



September 1, 1092 










CAftY COMOVCR Co t-g an 



Bored stiff 

Lynn McAllister, junior in engineering, takes a nap in the quiet of Farrell Library after class Monday. 



Insurance 
company 
coverage 
different 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

children. Spouses who are not 
students can still use Lafene for 
100*percent coverage as long as 
they pay the Lafene service fee, 
which students pay with tuition. 

The Farm Bureau Insurance 
company in Manhattan also has a 
plan for students. 

Andy McIIvaine, agent for Farm 
Bureau, said their student plan is 
with Blue Cross/Blue Shield and 
provides two options for students. 

The first costs $56.48 monthly 
and has a $500 deductible, and the 
second costs $48.41 monthly with I 
$1000 deductible. Each of these 
options is for ages 20 and under. 
For ages 20-24 the cost for the 
$300 deductible goes up to $65.28. 

Applications for the student 
insurance plan are available at both 
the Student Governing Association 
office and Lafene. 

All undergraduates enrolled in at 
least seven credit hours and 
graduate students enrolled in at 
least three credit hours are eligible 
for the policy. 

The enrollment period for the ' 
insurance plan begins the first day 
of fee payment and ends 31 days 
after. 



»*£& 






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SSENTIALS 



four source for the comics and the 
crossword. Look for new features. 




Ag Communicators sweep 
convention awards, elections 



ROV OftABIH 

CMaJhi 

K -State brought the president, an 
adviser and a bundle of awards 
home this summer from the 
National Agricultural Commu- 
nicators of Tomorrow convention in 
Washington, D.C. 

Melanic Hundley, senior in 
agricultural journalism, was elected 
national president of ACT. making 
it the third consecutive year K-Slate 
has had a national officer. 

Darla Mainquist. senior in 
agricultural journalism, served as 
ACT's national editor last year. In 
1990. Beth Gaines, a recent K-State 
graduate, was also the national 
president. 

"I attended last year's meeting 
and felt that my previous 
involvement in FFA and other 
organizations would be able to help 
me," Hundley said. 

"I was interested in what Darla 
and Beth were doing, and it just 
seemed like a real exciting thing to 
do." she said. 

Hundley said her duties include 
representing ACT at meetings with 



other communications organi- 
zations, such as the Public 
Relations Society of America. She 
will also help organize activities 
within different colleges of 
agriculture. 

K- Si ate ACT supervisor Larry 
Grpelding was also elected national 
adviser for the third consecutive 
year. 

In addition to her new position, 
Hundley returned with second-place 
honors in the news- writing category 
for an article she wrote about the 
merger of K-State's horticulture 
and forestry departments. 

K-State swept the category, as 
Angie Snow, a recent graduate in 
agricultural journalism, took first 
and Xody Lynn, senior in 
agricultural journalism, nabbed 
third. 

K-State ako swept the radio 
production category. DeLoss 
Jahnke. junior in agricultural 
journalism, took both first and 
second place with separate entries. 
Janet Bailey, junior in agricultural 
journalism, won third place. 

Mainquist took first in 



advertising, and Danette King, a 
recent graduate in animal sciences 
and industry, won third. 

Other awards included Jennifer 
Swanson, sophomore in agricultural 
journalism, who took first in feature 
writing. 

The Kansas State Agriculturist, a 
student publication, took third in 
the magazine competition. 

"We're definitely on the rise," 
Erpelding said of the chapter. "Last 
year we had more of a variety, 
because of a win in photography 
and Danctte's win in 
extemporaneous speaking. But, we 
had more clean sweeps this year. 

"It would be fun to go back and 
see how many years we've placed 
with the Agriculturist." he said 
"There have been very few years 
when we didn't place in the top 
three." 

ACT is an organization for 
college students in agricultural 
communications with more than 15 
chapters and nearly 200 members 
nationwide. 



Unrest unsettles former Soviet republics 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

killed and 50 were wounded in 
weekend clashes in Abkhazia. 

The news agencies ITAR-Tass 
and Nega reported that refugees 
from Tajikistan gathered iiround the 
presidential palace in the Tajik 



capital of Dushanbe. 

The protesters blocked the 
palace and government parking lot. 
and later police allowed them to 
occupy the building's first floor. 

ITAR-Tut said the officials 
were kept hostage on the palace's 



first floor. 

Nega identified the hostages as 
Vice Premiers Tukhboy Gafarov 
and Jamshed Karimov. Cabinet 
business manager Ramazati 
Mirzoyev and presidential military 
adviser Kholbobo Sharipov. 



Health Care Directory 



TAMARA J. HAWK 
L8C8W 



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MSUHAMCE 

WELCOME 



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Dr. Larry Dall D.C. 

1410 Poyntz 539-9113 



Dr. Jeanne 
Klopfenstcin 



ffl 



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Chiropractic Treatment • Nutritional Therapy 
Sports Injuries 

radio Oimc 776- 1850 




Linda D. Consigu, D.C • 1325 Anderson Ave., Man. 

ACROSS FROM ItSU CAMPUS 



DERMATOLOGY 

Robert H. Cathey 
M.D.RA. 

Diplomate Am. Board 

Dermatology 

For Apt. call 

537-4990 

^1133 College Ave. Bldg K.j A 



KKKND.X S H\\(,rIMS(Stt 



Individual * Family 

Couple * Women 's Issues 

Gender Issues 



GARY H. BOXER, M.D. 

• Depression • Men's Issues • Anxiety 

Individual & Family Therapy 

Medication Management 

Most Insurance lOf 

Accepted 776"84&4 S. Seth Child Rd. 



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200 SOUTHWIND PI. 
Suite 104 



Dental Associates 

of Manhattan 




1 133 College Ave., Bldg. D 

Manhattan, Kansas 66502 

913/539-7401 



C.W. Hughes. D.D.S., J.R. Fettle. D.D.S., W.L. Lata. D.D.S. 
R.A. Fulton, D.D.S.. W.C. Strutz. D.D.S., K.S. Carlson, D.D.S. 



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Look for the 

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the first 

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1 ••Pt«mb f 1, 1— » 



i 



Agriculture offered expansion funds 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



HOT 

CojfefiM 

K-State has been offered more 
than $4 million to expand and 
improve the College of Agriculture, 

Sen. Bob Dole. R-Kan., 
announced Aug. 1 1 U.S. Senate 
allocated funds for K-State 
agricultural facilities and programs. 

The money has been granted for 
fiscal year 1993, effective Oct I . 

The funds will be used primarily 
for the expansion of Throckmorton 
Hall. 

The original construction of 
Throckmorton, also known as Phase 
One, was completed in 1981. A 
total of $1.35 million has been 
allocated for the current project, 
Phase Two. 

Part of Phase Two, the 
greenhouses north of 

Throckmorton, has already been 
completed. 

Gary Paulsen, professor of 
agronomy and member of the Plant 
Science Building Committee, said a 
total of 96,000 square feet will be 
added to Throckmorton on the east 
and west sides of the building. 

After construction is complete, 
the agronomy, horticulture, 
forestry, recreational resources and 
plant pathology departments will all 
be housed in Throckmorton. 

Paulsen said the College of 
Agriculture will reap the benefits of 
similar departments working more 
closely together. 

Currently, the bulk of the 
horticulture department is in Waters 



Hall, and most of the forestry 
department is in Call Hall. 

The agronomy department is 
spread between Throckmorton and 
Waters halls and the Waters Hall 
Annex. 

Though Paulsen said he was 
thankful for the grant, he also said 
K-State has been waiting for this 
expansion for a long time. 

"I knew of some faculty in the 
late 1940s who were planning for 
some new facilities," Paulsen said. 

"But back in 1957, the agronomy 
wing in Waters burned. As a 
consequence. Waters Hall was 
renovated," he said. 

"That greatly delayed the 
building. Finally, in the 1970s, we 
received the funding for Phase 
One." 

Paulsen said corners were cut 
during the construction of Phase 
One because of inflation trouble 
during the late 1970s. He said some 
floors, for example, weren't tiled. 

"We've been much more 
fortunate because inflation has been 
low," he said. "We're getting all we 
wanted for Phase Two, plus a few 
alternate needs. It's very, very hard 
to predict whether or not the money 
is going to cover the needs, but it 
looks like we'll be able." 

An additional $159,000 has been 
allocated to help fund the Wheat 
Genetics Resource Center, based at 
Throckmorton. This center works to 
improve wheat programs in (he 
United States and internationally. 

"This is going to give us some of 



the finest facilities in the nation," 
Paulsen said. "It will allow us to do 
some work in breeding that we 
haven't been able to before. 

"It will help us do a better job in 
serving agriculture. There can be 
powerful multiplier effects, because 
when we come up with new 
varieties of wheat, alfalfa, sorghum 
or soybeans, it can mean millions of 
dollars to agriculture." 

Other areas boosted by 
government funding include alfalfa 
and canola research programs. Like 
the wheat genetics research 
program, the money is granted to 
help develop new grain varieties, as 
well as improve existing ones. 

The alfalfa program received 
$125,000, and $100,000 has been 
given for canola research. 

A $94,000 grant will make 
possible first-year funding for water 
conservation techniques research at 
K State. A $100,000 grant has been 
issued for the development of 
statewide agricultural informational 
programs. 

However, the biggest bulk of the 
government funding — $1,942 
million — will go toward a food- 
safety program. 

For the fourth consecutive year, 
this project researches techniques to 
help the beef, poultry and pork 
industries assure consumers that 
there is a safe supply of meat 
available. K-State will work with 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
the University of Arkansas and 
Iowa State University on this 



project. 

Curtis Kastner, professor of 
animal sciences and industry and 
research coordinator, said the 
project will not only research ways 
to make meat safer, but it will also 
study ways to extend its shelf life. 

"If we could find ways to 
increase the shelf life, that would be 
very important to the economy, as 
far as exporting and shipping 
internationally is concerned," he 
said. 

K-State's College of Agriculture 
has also received some federal 
funds not included in those Dole 
announced. 

David Mugler, associate dean of 
agriculture, said for the second year 
in a row K-State received $130,000. 
which is the maximum funding 
permitted through the USDA 
Higher Education Programs 
Challenge Grants Program. 

He said North Carolina State 
University was the only other 
school to receive the maximum 
allocation. 

These federal dollars will be 
used to conduct a workshop scries 
on mandatory components of 
college teaching and its 
efFectivcness. Mugler said. 

He said satellite and 
telecommunication technologies 
will be used in these workshops. 

"We've been faring very well." 
Mugler said. "Not many people 
max out, but we had some faculty 
members write some awfully good 
proposals." 




E 



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DAKYLBUSI 









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ONE DAYTO LIVE 







"Day 5 — Wolfgang? Ogre Kornbutt? 
Together?? Can't be. 

Three days later, and 10 minutes after 
the Redskin's quadruple-triple-double 
sudden death overtime victory over the 
49ers and after the introductions were 
finished, Wolfgang gels down to business 
about why be is there. He is there to show 
off his new fiancee. Ogre Kornbutt! 
Sputnik is too stunned to find out where he 
met her. so he decides to let Delilah ask. 
But Delilah has that "took" in her eyes, as 
she is giving Wolfgang the once-over look 
twice. He finally overcomes his anger, his 
surprise, his shock to ask Wolfgang when 
and where he mel his half-sister. Ogre. 

Wolfgang explains, "We met at a 
combine pull and lawnmower competition 
in Leningrad. 1 saw her standing in line at 
the * All the Vodka You Can Drink* stand, 
and she was talking to this one guy, who, 
of all people, just happens to be my third- 
grade teacher's mechanic, who just 
happens to be fluent in Swahili! He 
introduced us, and it was love at first sight. 
Besides, I've heard that Swahili is the 



language of combine-pull competitions, 
and of course, the language of love." 

Still confused and flabbergasted. 
Sputnik now demands to know how 
Wolfgang and Ogre located him. All eyes 
turn to Ogre Kornbutt. as she is busy 
chomping on some Tridelt chewing gum, 
which is giving her pure chewing 
satisfaction. She stops, looks back at them 
and smiles sheepishly. 

"Ewe cain foase mee tew leesen tew 
Pwala DeDual. ewe cain foase mee tew 
skwair dainse, ane ewe cain foase mee tew 
warch da weeter kannle fo sise ahs stwate, 
but ahs weel nepher tail ewes whar ahs 
goat dis ere Twidilt guum." 

{TRANSLATION: "You can force me to 
listen to Paula Abdul, you can force me to 
square dance, and you can force me to 
watch the weather channel for six hours 
straight, but I will never tell you where I 
got this Tridelt gum.") 

What is going on here? How did 
Wolfgang and Ogre Kornbutt track down 
Sputnik and Delilah? And, how did Ogre 
get ahold of some of that exquisite Tridelt 
chewing gum? See tomorrow's Collegian. 



CROSSWORD 



EUGENE SHEET* 



ACROSS 

iPub 

measure 
5 "On Top 

Of — 

Smokey* 
• Bark doth 

12 Nonesuch 

13 Society 



37 Civet 
3$ Hunting 
hound 

41 Canal 
zona? 

42 Last 
writes' 7 

43 Behave 



14 Fetid 

15 Office 
hotline? 

17 -Welcome 

—•(77 

movte) 
IS "Raven" 

man 
19 High 

regard 
21 Waldorf 

or Caesar 

24 Pay to 
play 

25 Egyptian 
deity 

26 Bank 
payment 

30 Classic 

31 Kind of 
moth 

32 Malay 

K'bon 
tamed 
ships in 
port 

35 Carry on 

36 Dye 
indigo 



catty 

46 Split 

49 picker 

(fussy 

one) 

50 Ornamen- 
tal case 

51 Rend 

52 To the 
right 

53 Nest of 
pheasants 

DOWN 

1 Luau dish 

2 Wayside 
haven 



3 Court 
barrier 

4 Early 
surgical 
tool 

5 Story 
starter 

6 Gene's 
role in 
"The Pro- 
ducers* 

7 Insane 
6 Wale 

unsteadily 
9 Lily plant 

10 Velvety 
rug 
surface 

1 1 First 
gardener 

16 Stewart or 
Staiger 

20 Follower 
tor road 
or gang 



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Yesterday's answer 9-1 



21 Hindu 
garment 

22 Final 
word? 

23 Plunder 

24 Broadway 
backer 

26 Setting 
fire to 

27 Greek 
under- 
ground 

29 Droops 

29 Surgeon's 

patient, 

perhaps 

31 Sea eagle 

34 Word 
before 
bonnet 
or bunny 

35 One 
Beany 

37 "Norma — ' 

38 Industrial 
diamond 

39 He loved 
an Irish 
Rose 

40 Hindu god 

41 Kitchen 
follower 

44 Never, 
in Bonn 

45 Philippine 
Negrito 

46 Bovine 
mouthful 

47 Even the 
score 



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BTIIUPC^O For answers lo today i crossword call 
9 I VMrCl/i 1-900^544873 '»« per minute, touch 
lone /rotary phones (18+ oofr ) * King Features service, NYC 



9-1 CRYPTOQUIP 

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Yesterday's Cryptoqulp: MY SISTER USED TO 
DATE THE NEW PLUMBER IN TOWN, BUT HE WAS 
ONLY A DRIP. 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue: H equals F 



«ur> «i 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



September 1, 1002 A A 



I 



■ 
1/ 




LASSIFIEDS 



GET THE WORD OUT 

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN KEDZIE 103 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



1 DAY 20 words or less — $5 

each word over 20 — $.20 per word 

2 DAYS 20 WOfd s or (ess — $6.25 

each word over 20 — $.25 per word 

3 DAYS 20 * ord S or less — $7.25 

each word over 20 — $.30 per word 

4 DAYS 20 words or less — $8 

each word over 20 — $.35 per word 

5 DAYS 2 w ° f ds or less — $8.50 

each word over 20 — $.40 per word 
(consecutive day rate) 



HOW TO MY 

fllrlMiBirtri mi i it Tin rill" i" i— 
untes* you have an established account 
w»S«udtntPUiltc»ttoft«. 

Cat*, entca, MesterCanj or Visa are 
miftHt There Is ■ J10 servfc* Charge 

on al nlurrMd checks 

lafrress^fhenght to edrt, reject or 
prapstfy classify afiy ad. 



For an nto charge. •»'(! put a 

i your ad to catch ttw 



DEADLINES 

Classified ads must be placed by 
noon tha day baton tha oast you wart 
r our ad to run Ctes»*M dlapiay ads 
must be placed by 4 p m. tarn woriung 
days prior to tha date you start your ad 
to fun 

FREE FOUND ADS 

As a tame* to you, wt run found ads 
tor three days bet of charge. 



CANCELLATIONS 

tt you tafl your rtam batent your ad 
basaxpirad, art stilt refund you for tha 
isrnatrilng, days. 

You must all us baton noon the day 
tnaadislobapubMhad 

CORRECTIONS 

ft you find an error In your ad, 
cas us. We accept 

lor the first 



» 




PARKING 

OF THE 

UNION 



Call 532-6555 to place your classified.! 



ftaa-ssss 

MX 

sai-7doo 



classifieds 




OFFICE HOURS 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 



8 a.m. -5 p.m. 

(Except holidays] 




BULLETIN 
BOARD 



AnoMjncvffNMtS 




ADVANCED FLIGHT 

Training. Multi-engine, 
instrument commercial. 
ATP, CFl ratings 
Private and instrument 
ground school 

Hugh Irvtn at 539-3128 
evenings. 

COME fly with us. KState 

Flying Club has 
five airplanes. For best 
prices call Sam 
Knipp, 539-6193 after 

5:30p.m. 

NEW INTERNATIONAL 
Youth Hostel open 
mg between Wichita/ 
Junction City. 

$7 50 night. Stone 
Prairie Inn, Marion. 
KS 66861 Reservations 
required. 
(316)382-2746 

WAGON WHEEL Antiques. 
409 Lincoln, Wa 
mego. New arrivals, 
marbles and furni- 
ture, phone 456-8480 
or 494-2388 



ATTENTION WILDCATS 

Ttic KuiiH Army 
National Guard a 
like to help you' In 
addiiion to Mm it lily drill 
pay »r oflct the following 
Mcenttvc program* 
82.000 bonu-, ;-■ 
Bill and I lie S 10 000 loan 
repayment fsntstsjs* By 
serving two days a month 
and two weeks a ycai you 
could quality (or up to 
828.000 To Bud If you 
qualify call 537 4108 



Los! and Found 




FOUND LADIES wrist watch 
Identify in Urn- 
berger 123. 

LOST DOG' Short haired 
Vusia. red with white 
diamond on chest Two 
collars on, flea col- 
lar and rabies 
vaccination tag. Six 
months 
old. 587 0630 




FREDUMS- HAVE a grand 
birthday'l love 

you" Naughty Nikki. 



«. 




Warm tt Up! 

Turn up the heat at 

your next pan) 1 with 

•wo Wild h«' Tubs 

•FX££ Ddivenr 
'FMESetl'p 
•CALL TODAY' 

537-1821 
W*fn5sWJ 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



For ftsnt- 




A HOUSE with three 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 

campus. Central air and 
heating. S600 537-0428. 

AIR CONDITIONED, very 
clean one, two. 
three-bedroom units. 
Furnished or unfur- 
nished. Ouiet 
surroundings for serious 
students. Nine month 
lease available. No 
pets. 537-8389 

CLOSE TO campus very 
nice. one. two. 
three and four- 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great prices. 

537-2919, 537-1666. 

NEWLY REMODELED three 
bedroom, two 

bath, one-half block 
from campus No 
pets 776-1340 

ONE BEDROOM CLOSE to 
campus, laundry 

facilities, gas heat. $320 
No Pets. 

776-3804 

TWO-BEDROOM 

LUXURIOUS apartment 

in 

Northpark Apartments 

at 1200 Fremont 

near campus Central 
air, dishwasher; 

disposal, laundry 
facilities. 537 0428. 
537 8790 




CLOSE TO campus very 
nice, one. two. 
three and four- 
bedrooms. Apartment 
com- 
plexes and houses with 
great prices 

537-2919, 537-1666 

EFFICIENCY FOR two. one 
block from cam- 
pus. Washer/ dryer 
4S6-2240 



WANTED 

ients looking lor 

. actommcxi: 

!!*n ywn 

bedroom withm i 

4-bedroom townhome. 

In unit amenities include: 

• Osfetaashfr 

• Mktmim 

* ttxhtn&Dntn 
Cumple* alio includes; 

* Hot Tutu 

» Sind Volbrbill Courti 
\i io* & .11 95 ^"icrtn bc ar* .- 
WJI ratJi roemmjie 
ilrwnun 

i i thoti eiie AJiliSie 
Cil<vtnjo»«Vnenl 



776-3804 




FOUR BEDROOM, TWO 
bath, central air, 
laundry, near campus. 
$180 each. 

537-8800 

ONE BEDROOM, CLOSE to 
campus. Laun- 

dry facilities, central air 
and heat. $350 
No pets. 776-3804 
Available Oct. 1. 

ONE-BEDROOM.CLOSE TO 
campus, central 
air and heat, laundry 
facilities.. $340. No 
Pets. 776-3804 

Available Oct 1 

SPACIOUS. VERY dean two 
three bedroom, 
two bath, air 
conditioned, laundry 
hook- 
ups. Waterbeds 
accepted Quiet 

surround- 
ings for serious 
students. No pets. Also 
ana 

and two bedroom units. 
537-8389. 

THE PERFECT roommate 
apartment. Nine 
month leases. Extra 
large two-bedroom. 
Two private baths. 
Washer and dryer in- 
cluded. Dishwasher. 
Swimming pool. Pri- 



vate balcony Immediate 
availability. Up- 

perctassmen and 
graduate students pre 
ferred. Call 776-8641. 



115 



WANT A place to live this 
school year? 

Teacher wants college 
girt to live in 
Housing/ meals in 
exchange for a few 
chores. Write Box 5 
Collegian 



120 



Fer Sent- 

HOMSM 



A HOUSE with three- 
bedrooms and three 
bathrooms near 
campus. Central air and 
heating $600. 537-0428. 

AVAILABLE SEPT. 1 four- 
bedroom. Located 
1715POvntz Two bath. 
fireplace, wash 
er, dryer, yard $620 
plus utilities lease 
plus deposit 539-3672 

TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE, 
two and one-half 
miles from Town Center 
On Highway 24. 
776-1340 




change for horse 

training or light oattte 

and 

horse chores. 776-1205. 

8pm 9pm Or P. 

O. Box 1211 

ROOMMATE NEEDED, dose 
to campus and 
Aggieville call 539-3719 
or 539 6092 

(male or female I 

ROOMMATE WANTED for 

farmhouse six 

miles from town. Horse 
facilities $125/ 

month plus utilities, 
539-2029. 

ROOMMATE WANTED One 
block from cam- 
pus and Aggieville. 
$125' month, one- 
fourth utilities, own 
bedroom in house 
with easy going guys. 
537-2055 

SERIOUS NON SMOKER to 
share two bed- 

room house trailer Own 
room. $100 plus 
halt utilities 776-3436 
leave message 

SERIOUS NONSMOKING 
female Own 

room. furntshed$150 
month plus utili 
ties. Two blocks from 
campus Leave 

message 639- 7141 

TWO ROOMMATES needed. 
One half block 

east of campus 
Upperclassmen pre- 
ferred. Call 776-7794 



SAVE WITH hot water so'ar 
Three- bedroom 
with studio apartment 
for income close 
to city park and campus 
Good ne.gh 

borhood. $62 900 1 
800 593 0519 



WANTED 

roommate 

cam 

cus Call 

587-0651. 



FEMALE 

Close to 

Dawn 





FREE ADVICE Purchase a 
mobile home 

We finance low 
payments; two- 
bedroom. 

$149.75 monthly 
Countryside 539-2325. 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



Tutor 




SMALL GARAGE available 
Sept. 1 $50 a 
month. 539-5136. 



INSTRUCTOR: TEST 
preparation organua 
tion needs individual 
to teach GRE Prep 
program top scores 
needed. Call 

(9131262-5378. 




MALE ROOMMATE needed: 

Nonsmoking 
Furnished, need bed, 
$230 a month, in- 
cludes all utilities. Leave 
message. 537- 

1199 

MALE ROOMMATE, 

graduate student, non 
smoking to share two 
bedroom apart- 
ments. One block to 
campus, share bath 
room. furnished 
Washer, dryer $175 
plus electricity. 
776-4776 

MALE ROOMMATES 
wanted. Two three 
rooms available. 
Brittnay Ridge estate. 
Call 

Darin, 776-0589 Leave 
message. 

NEED ONE female to occupy 
small upstairs 

bedroom, furnished, 
good location. $90. 
call 537 4593 or 532 
4066 for Jenny 

NON SMOKING MALE to 
be fourth person in 
two- bed room 
apartment ST 20/ month 
plus one- fourth utilities. 
537-1610 

ONE FEMALE to share three- 
bedroom apart- 
ment for first semester 
Own room, wash 
er/ dryer and pool. $170 
plus one-third 

utilities. 537-4340 

ONE NON-SMOKING female 
roommate need- 
ed to share three- 
bedroom apartment 
close to campus. Please 
call 776-3421 

ONE- THREE non- smoking 
females. farm- 

house, barn, pasture 
for horses, cattle, 
dogs. Prefer Veterinary, 
Animal Science, 
Horticulture maiors. 
Possible rent in ax- 



ABC typing service. You do 
the Studying, 

let me do the typing. 
Reports, charts, 
graphs, resumes and 
more Overnight re- 
sults when necessary 
Go ahead. give 
me a call 537-9480 after 
5pm ask for 

Jackie. 

A QUALITY resume is vital 
in today's com- 
petitive job market. 
Contact the cour- 
teous staff at Resume 
Service for your 
resume, cover letter 
and form typing 
needs. Serving KSU 
students and stall 
for over a decade 343 
Colorado St. 

537-7294. 

PAPERS, GRAPHS and 

miscellaneous typ- 
ing at reasonable rates 
537-0599 

RECOGNIZE THIS* We're 
still here! Utilize 
my B.S. in English/ 
Speech for papers/ 
editing; my ten years 
personnel man 

agement for resumes. 
$1.25 double: lot 
ter quality. Call Janice 
537-2203 

TYPING IN my home, 
available days and 
evenings Gail 539-6678. 



220 



SEWING AND alterations, 
Tairara 61 1 N 
Eleventh St 537-2128. 



Musfciana/DJs 




PRIVATE MUSIC lessons, 
piano and guitar 
classes, taught by KSU's 
music faculty. 

Classes begin 

September 8 Call 
532-5566 Of 532-5740. 

YAMAHA TWO channel 
diversity wireless 
guitar system Excellent 
condition 

Would be great for 
Opus Competition or 
touring band. Call for 
details 539-6912. 



250 



Repair 



MAKE THE interior of your 
car look like new I 
will clean and dress 
vinyl, shampoo seats 
and carpet, clean 
windows and fabric 
shield interior, $38 For 
more information 
and appointments call 
Blake 537 2378 

NISSAN DATSUN Repair 
Service 20 years 
experience Auto Craft. 
2612 Dipper Lane, 
Manhattan. Kansas. 537 
5049 8a m. 

5pm Monday through 
Friday 



255-- 



ADAMS INTERIOR Exterior 
Painting Serv 

ice offering quality 
service at affordable 
prices Call for a free 
estimate Also dry- 
wan, carpenter, and 
furniture making of 
fered .776-5281 ask for 
Craig. 

HEALTH AND Auto 
insurance Call us be- 
fore buying the 
University Health Plan 
Multi- line Agency 555 
PoynU Suite 

215. Tim Engle 
537-4661 

LOSE WEIGHT. Increase 
energy 100 per- 
cent herbal capsule 
proven to burn body 
fat boost energy, and 
take oft weigtit nat 
urally Call Julie at 539- 




310 



The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 

in the Employment 
classification Readers 
are advised to ap- 
proach any such 



reasonable caution. 
The Collegian 

urges our reader* to 
contact tha Better 
Business Bureau. SOI SE 
Jefferson, Tope 

ka, KS 66607 1190 
191312 32 -04S4. 

20 PEOPLE needed to help 
capitalize on tre- 
mendous market for 
Shaperite Products. 
Discover this unique 
100 percent herbal 
line that's sweeping 
america. Superb 
pay plan and 
professional training. 
For 

free sample arid intro 
pack call; 

I800)788-6740ext.361. 

CH1LDCHILD NANNIES eaat 
coast nannies. 

NY. Conn.. Long Island. 
and NJ areas. 
Live in one year 
commitments. $150 and 
up per week. Immediate 
placements In- 

terviews and 

applications call 
18001858 2429 Or 
(3161682-1735. 

CHINESE RESTAURANT, 
kitchen help. Ex 
perwnce preferred, part 
time 539-2561 

CNA STONEYBROOK 
Retirement Commun 
ity is looking for caring 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



and enthusiastic 
CNA's to work full or 
part time, evenings 
or nights. Must have 
Kansas cert) fi ca- 
tion Apply at 2025 LMt 
Kitten Ave. 

776-0065 EOE 

COM PljTE R SUPPORT and 

Programming po- 
sitions are available tor 
K State students 
with a variety of skills. 
Support Technicians 

must have good 

interpersonal skill*, have 
experience with PCs 
and popular software 
packages like 

WordPerfect. Lotus. 
dBase 

Must have a firm 
understanding of 
MSDOS, and Windows, 
and have some 
programming skills 
Software Developers 
and Network Assistants 
must have ex- 
perience with DC**, 
data based man 
agement systems (SQL 
dBase. Paradox) 
and with Novell. UNIX. 
MS DOS. and Wind 
ows. GUI programming 
experience in X Or 
Windows 3 1 is 
especially helpful 
Applica 

tions will be available' 
accepted until 

9192at211 Umberger 
Hall 

HAVE FUN earning $500- 
$1 500 in one 
week! Student 

organizations needed 
for 

marketing protect 
on-campus Must be 
motivated and 

organised Call Meianx» 
at 1800)592-221 exi 123- 

MARKETING PART TIME- 
Sophomore or Ju- 
nior. Marketing Maior, 
15 to 20 hours par 
week. own 

transportation 
Godfather s 
Pitia call Mrs 
Chambers 

1800)937-0112. Mon- 
Tues 1- 4pm 

only. 

NEW BEGINNING lingerie 
and day wear de- 
signed by Cameo Now 
hiring $20 regis- 
tration fee, earn your 
kit also booking 
showings, Evelyn 
Wilihoil 1-762-2785. 

PART-TIME INTERIOR 
decorator and sales- 
person After schoot 
and weekends 

Apply at Faith Furniture 
next to Sirloin 
Stockade. 

PART TIME MANAGER- to 
hire/ train sales 
and management 
personnel. Good com- 

munications skills 
required. Recorded 
messaqe reveals details 
537-2662 

WANTED RESPONSIBLE 
person with some 
experience operating a 
Power Take OH 
grinder mixer with 
some mornings avail- 
able Call 1-457-3440 
before 8a m. 

WICHITA EAGLE s accepting 
applications 
for daily home delivery 
carrier, Manhat- 
tan Reliable 
transportation a must 
seven mornings a vmi*. 
Bond deposit 
required (800)825-6307 
ext 531. 




NEEDED VOLUNTEERS: 
Give one hour a 
week to someone 
recovering from men- 
tal illness. Call Co m pear 
Pawnee Mental 

Health Service* 
587-4333 



•J _J ^■Oa*«r»*jje*i 



The Collegian cannot 
veri f y the financial po- 



of advert* 



MM* 



in the Employment 
classification. Reader* 
are advised to ap- 
proach any such 



The Collagian 

urges our readers to 
contact tha Better 

Business Bureau, Ml SE 
Jefferson, Tose- 

k*. KS BBS07-11BO 
I9131232-04&4 



You're paid di 
red Fully guaranteed 
Fro* inform* 

lion — 24 hour hotline 
80137 9- 2900 
Copyright BKS13KDH 

$22.17/ HOUR Professional 
company 

seeks students to sen 
popular college 
parry* T-shirts (includes 
tye-dy*sl 

Choose from 12 
designs 1991-92 aver- 
age $22 17/hour Sales 
over twice aver 
age first month Orders 
shipped next 

day. Work on 
consignment with no 

nanoal obligation (Visa 
MC accepted) 

Call free anytime 
18001733-3265 

ALASKA SUMMER 

emptoymerrt — fisheries. 
Earn $5,000 plus/ 
month. Free transpor 
tation 1 Room and 
board' Over 8.000 
opening*. No 

experience necessary 
Male or female For 
employment program 
call Student 

Employment Services at 
1- 

206-545 4155 ext 
A5768 

ASSEMBLERS EXCELLENT 
mcome easy 

work assembling 
products at home 
Sevan day. 24- hour 
service information 
(504)646-1700 Dept 

mm. 



GREEKS 4 CLUBS 



rVUSEACOOL 

•1000 

BtJUeTOWsTSKI 
PUSI1000FDETHE 

; WHO calls: 

No 
YasdasptintEX 



lts»m»53l,ElIe5 




OPEN 

MARKET 



410' 



$200- $500 weekly. 

products at 

home Easy I No selling 



20-tNCH COLOR TV Remote 
control $135. 

1987 Dodge Lancer 
silver, four-door. 
68,000 miles Auto 
transmission, air con- 
dition, cassette. Drives 
and looks excel 
lent $4050 587 0948 

AMAZING 'ONE Day Diet' 
it sweeping the 
nation. Los* 16 to 20 
pounds in 30 days. 
Guaranteed' No drug*, 
no pills, no 

blenders, no hassle*. 
Call 776-3656. 

COBRA SOLAR stealth 
trapshooter radar de- 
tector, new. call Ryan 
(91 31485-231 3 

FOR SALE four cubic foot 
Avanti refrigerator, 
runs beautifully, has 
never needed sarv- 
« $80 Call 1-468-3381 

FOB SALEiDRAFTING table. 
24x32 with ad- 
justable leg*, built in 
pencil drawer. $75 
or beat offer. Chair, 
make offer. 

539-4231. 

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS: 
Camollage cloth- 
ing, field jackets, 
overcoats, new G.I 
boots, sleeping bans. 
Alio CARHARTT 
workwsei Monday- 
Saturday. 9- 5. St. 
Marys Surplus Sales, 
St. Marys, KS 
1-437-2734. 

PRINTER AND typewriter 
ribbons; computer 
paper, copy paper. Hull 
Business Sup- 

ply T16 N 12th. 
Aog.evilkt 539-1413. 



SAMICK ACOUSTIC guitar 
with case 

537-1867 ask lor Dan. 

STOP BY the K Stale Un,on 
Bookstore's 
Computer Book Sale 
Aug 31- Sept 4 in 
the Union Courtyard. 
You'll fmd savings 
of up to 50 percent of 
publishers prices 
on a large assortment 
of books 

TOPEKA OAILY Capital 
Semester Special 776- 
1562 

WINDOW UNIT «ir 
conditioners for sale 
28.000 BTU $300.14.000 
BTU $50. 

5.000 BTU, HO volt. 
$75 776-9069 



AGGIE'S NEW TO YOU 
Second Hand Store 

537-8803 

yon-SatlOJOa.in.-Tpm 
1 124 B Bora 



Wohler's 
Used Furniture 

OpenM-F II 
Thursdays ttl 8 p m 
Sat. & Sun I -5 p m 
615 N. 3rd 339-3119 




386SX. VGA two MB ram 
107 MB HD Five 
and one -fourth and 
three and one-half 
drive*. Modem, mouse, 
game port. 24 
pin printer. Two year 
warranty Software 
included 1 Best offer! 
539-3075 

LC MACINTOSH, color 

monitor with soft- 
ware $1900, 539-1 127. 

MAC CLASSIC, four meg 
ram, 40 meg hard 
drrve Stytewnter printer 
$1450. 
537-8990 

NEW 286-20, i ero wail, one 
MB Ram two 

high density floppies. 
40 MBHD. mono- 
chrome, mouse, 
programs, MiniTower. 
$580 539-6348. 

537-2704 

NOTEBOOK COMPUTER. 
Toshiba T2200SX. 
38620MHZ.60MBh.ard 
drive, very small 
and compact Only 5 5 
pounds. Microsoft 
ball point mouse 
included. Must sell. 537- 
0468 

PC. MONOCHROME 

monitor, two floppy 
drives, 16 inch printer, 
manuals. soft 

ware {including word 
processing pro- 
gram!. Excellent 
condition $400 or best 
offer 537-6867 Ask for 
John. 




ELECTRIC GUITAR- Castilia 
custom ired 
Jackson Charvel 
Humbucker pickup, 
Whammy bar, new 
GHS strings $175 or 
beat offer Call 532-2289 
**k for Andy. 



455 



FIREARMS SALES and 
repair. Bore sight- 
ing, shotgun bore and 
chamber polish- 
ing. New Ruger M77R 
270. Ruger M77R 
Mark II 308 used Savage 
110 30-06 with 
537-8796 




CD PLAYER- Technic*, single 
disc pro- 

grammable, remote 
compatible. $100 or 
best offer, 532-2S73. 
Jon. 




Tickets ts 

BuyVi; 




WANTED TWO Garth Brooks 
tickets Front 

row if possible. Day 
(913)491-2249. 
evening 1913)829-4118 

YOU'VE DONE summer. 

Now plan winter 

break 
London. Paris. Rome, Dec. 

27- Jan. 8. 

$1690 see D<ane Dollar. 

An Department 

for significant details. 







M 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 




1978 CUTLASS Supreme 
260 v8, auto, air, 
power steering, 

maintenance log nuns 
well . Si 1 50 or best oner, 
call 532-5600. 

1984 TEMPO two-doors 
60.000 miles Auto 
transmission air 
condition, cassette 
asking »or or best offer. 
Can Clement 

537-9852 

1986 MAZDA RX-7 runs. 
drives and looks 
enoeHent must sell need 

cash thfs 

week S3900 c best offer 
537-4272 

CHEAP' FBI U.S. seued 
1989 Mercedes 

$200. 1986 VW $50. 
1987 Mercedes 

$100. 1965 Mustang 
$50. Choose from 
thousands starting $25 
Free information 
24 hour hotline (801 1 
379-2929 Copy 
right number KS13KJC 

FOR SALE 69 Chev Impala 
327 V8 auto 
power steering Day 
449-5274 ask for 
Gene After 6pm 
499-5264 S800 




1990 SCHW1NN MOS impact 
mountain bike 

Call 539-0507 for 
information. 

1992 PARAMOUNT SR40 
mountain bike. 

Many extras: speedo. 
climb bars, head 
lighL worth $900 plus. 
$650 Call 

776-2257 

850 TREK. 18- inch like new, 
$300 537 1591. 

SCHWINN TRAVELER. 12- 
speed. 20 inch 
cherry red, in such 
excellent condition, I 
must be crazy to sell it 
for $85, 

776-9021 




TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 




SAN JUAN Students 
"Xmas Break" Airfare 
round trip from Kansas 
City $457.20 call 
Kansas State Travel. 
537-2491 



12 * * pt * mb * f h MB 




* 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




\[ou l(now,ff/;orid/C(jW. If Idorifcall my 

parent; every Sunday at exactly 5 o'clock, 

they thir\K I wa; kidnapped by a/ienc, or 

Something. Anyway, one Sunday rne and 

f^ark,we decide to -teke-ofT and check out 

the C\fy. fo we're hanj/nj out and 2 /ooK" at 

rr\y watch. 5 o'clocfc Ali-ght, ft> my Call/rig 

card and I head oWn to the /oc*a/ poof ha//, 
(which I Happen to ((now ha; a payphohe) 
And I tell the folk* the Mart/an; 5er\d 
-tKefr berf." 



o matter where you happen to be, the AT&T ^, 
Calling Card can take you home. « 

It's also the least expensive way to call !&JF ,, " M "" 

state-to-state onAT&T, when you can't dial direct. With 



Ml»S» IU (M t'M V II 



the new AT&T Call and Save Plan, you'll get special discounts 
on AT&T Calling Card calls? And once you have your card, 



you'll never need to apply for another. 

If you get your Calling Card now, your first call will 
be free** And you'll become a member of AT&T Student 
Saver Plus, a program of products and services that 
saves students time and money 
All of which makes the AT&T Calling Card out of this world. 



lb get an ABET Calling Card for off-campus calling, call 1 800 654-0471 Ext. 650. 



AT&T 



.:.>_«,»•.< 



4/- 



= 







C KANSAS STATE * 
OLLEGIAN 





" YOU'RE | 
ASKING 1 


INSIDE 


■TV 

column iom 
todttSend i 
bJMT 

KtlUL 


by 

■ C— •— idn> 1 





WEDNESDAY 



XVK^ 




WEATHER - PAGE 2 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1992 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99, NUMBER 8 



1 


WIT' • * 

40 ^^S*mf^ 












'If - - 


• 




\ 






,♦» 


^^ ^yJlP 1 


• 







CAMPAIGN '92 

Quayle 
greeted by 
fans, foes 



Over the hill 

Peggy Mays, of the Division of Facilities ground* maintenance, rides 
40 hours a week mowing the K-State campus lewns. 



CANY CO«JOVIR'Coil«gian 

her mower across the front lawn of Durland Hall Tuesday afternoon. Mays said she spends 



NEWS DIGEST 


► 5TH GM PLANT IDLED BY STRIKE 


DETROIT (AP) — A fifth 


Lordstown, Ohio. That number 


General Motors Corp. assembly 


could grow by thousands in 


plant was idled today by a 


coming days. Negotiations 


United Auto Workers stnke at a 


resumed today in Lordstown as 


GM parts-making plant in Ohio. 


the stnke entered its sixth day. 


At least six more plants risk 


The key issue is job security. 


shutdown. 


The Wentzville, Mo. , plant 


In all, 25,900 GM workers 


with about 4,200 workers was 


are on furlough because of a 


the latest to run out of parts, 


strike by 2,400 workers a1 a 


said GM Flint Division 


metal parts fabricating plant in 


spokeswoman Laura Joseph. 


► AIR FARES BOUNCING BACK UP 


NEW YORK (AP) — Many 


increasing fares within the 


airlines are raising ticket prices 


continental United States by 


in hopes of ending the heavy 


about 30 percent. A second 


losses sustained in 


round expires Saturday. 


summertime price wars. The 


On the same day, most 


increases also result from 


airlines will also raise prices by 


travel-discount expirations. 


$10 to $40 in a round of 


Bui with fewer people 


increases initialed by 


traveling, the increases might 


Continental Airlines. United 


not stay, airline analysts said. 


Airlines and USAir, however, 


The first round of fall price 


will raise fares by about $10 to 


discounting expired Tuesday, 


$30. 



HURRICANE ANDREW 



Federal funds promised 



A— OCUTIO 

HOMESTEAD, Fla. 
President Bush took an 
emotional tour Tuesday of 
Hurricane Andrew's worsl 
ravages and pledged 100- 
percent federal reimbursement 
for eligible costs of the ntttlvv 
cleanup and rebuilding effort. 

He also announced that 
Homestead Air Force Base, 
which was ripped apart by the 
furious storm, will be rebuilt 
"to show our commitment to 
south Florida." 

"We're in this for the long 
haul. We won't leave until the 
job is done," said Bush in the 
courtyard of Homestead 
Middle School, now serving as 
an emergency medical center. 

There were complaints last 
week from some Dade County 
officials that Washington had 
been slow to respond. Bush 



canceled a weekend vacation 
and West Coast campaign trip 
to show Florida he cared — 
and to avoid the political 
fallout that could cost him the 
state's 25 electoral votes. 

But he heard no 
recriminations, only thanks, 
from Andrew's victims, as he, 
his wife. Barbara, and Defense 
Secretary Dick Cheney viewed 
(he devastation, comforting 
those who suffered and 
applauding the efforts of the 
military and other rescue 
workers, 

"If it wasn't for the federal 
government getting involved 
here, we'd be in big trouble." 
said Rick Prave, 33. an 
electrician from Leisure City. 

A Spanish-speaking woman 
hugged the Bushes. "She said 
she lost her whole house, but 
she felt like a millionaire after 



BUSM'S 
TRIP TO 
FLORIDA 



FLORIDA I 

mm 



HOMESTEAD 



uagM 

meeting the president," Barbara 
Bush said. 

The Bush party later flew 
from Florida to Louisiana for a 
look at the lesser damage there 
from Andrew's second U.S. 
landfall. They wound up in 
Jeanerette. La. 

There, Bush visited s 

■ See BUSH page 9 



ASSOCIATED 

KANSAS CITY. Mo. — Vice President Dan 
Quayle followed the campaign trail Tuesday to 
Kansas City, where he faced a crowd about 
equally divided between supporters and 
opponents. 

Quayle arrived at the Kansas City Downtown 
Airport just before 6:30 p.m., about half an hour 
behind schedule. 

The long wan gave Bush-Qua) le supporters as 
well as backers of Democratic nominee Bill 
Clinton time to exchange yells and jeers. As 
Republicans shouted, "Four more years!" the 
Democrats in the crowd responded, "Not!" 

Quayle left his plane and headed across the 
tarmac to a roped-off area lined two-deep by 
supporters and foes, the Bush-Quay le backers in 
front. Placards reading "Lesbian and Gay Civil 
Rights" were waved just inches from his face as 
he shook hands with men, women and children 
carrying Bush -Quayle signs. 

A Quayle staff member traveling w ith ihe vice 
president said the opposition in the crowd of 
about 200 was the most Quayle had drawn in a 
day thai began with appearances in several small 
towns in southwestern Georgia. 

Bui Quayle smiled throughout, working his 
way down the line to where a band and a knot of 
photographers and reporters waited to ask him 
about campaign issues. 

"Look, the president already said he made one 
big mistake, and that was to go along wiih the 
Democratic Congress" on a tax hike, Quayle said 
in a response to a question about whether 
President Bush would cut taxes in his second 
term, 

"It cost us jobs. They'll never do it again. And 
this lime we're talking about cutting taxes, 
restraining spending, and we feel that that is the 
recipe to creating more jobs," he said. 

As Quayle climbed into a limousine, the 
crowd renewed its chants of "Four more years" 
and "No more Bush." Responding to the former, 
Quayle took a microphone and said: "With this 
crowd, and this enthusiasm, there's absolutely no 
doubt in my mind we're going to have four more 
years of Bush and Quayle." 

His agenda free for the evening, Quayle 
headed to Ihe Westin Crown Center hotel in 
downtown Kansas City. 

Missouri is likely to be a hard-fought state as 
the election approaches. Both Republicans and 
Democrats have said their candidates or 
surrogates would campaign frequently in the state 
in the weeks ahead. 

Quayle 's schedule for Wednesday includes a 
discussion at a private home with participants in 
the Kansas City School District's Parents as 

■ See QUAYLE page 7 



FARRELL LIBRARY 



Student input 
key in repairs 



■ The 
architects 
plan to meet 
with students 
throughout 
the design > 
and con- 
struction of 
the library 
expansion and 
renovation. 



CoHtfun 

Brent Bowman and Associates of Manhattan 
have been chosen to design the expansion and 
renovation of Farrell Library. 

The firm was chosen by a panel consisting of 
representatives from K-State, the Kansas Board 
of Regents and the state. 

Dean of Libraries Brice Hobrock said the 
selection process was one of the most carefully 
done in the history of Kansas. 

University Architect Skyler Harper also 
voiced his confidence in the process. 

"We feel they are very qualified," he said. 

Bowman's firm was chosen Aug. 26 from a 
group of five finalists, after the panel reviewed 
structures designed by the final applicants. 

At the Aug. 27 Student Senate meeting. 
Harper and Hobrock stressed Bowman's interest 
in student input and said Bowman intends to 
meet with students periodically throughout the 
design and construction time. They also said the 
firm will consider designs submitted by 
architecture students last spring. 

Part of the $28-tnillion project will be paid for 
with a $5-million bond issue K- Slate students 
passed last November. The University has raised 
another $5 million, and the remaining $18 
million will come from state revenues. 

Hobrock said he expects a 1993 
groundbreaking. Completion is slated for spring 
1996. 



Greeks may get new house 



"1 feel we 
will be able 
to accom- 
plish It, but 
we're In a 



KSU Foundation works with 
fraternity lost to fire last year 



II mi nary 
stage. W% 



DAVE WEAVER 



Colkfun 

Pi Kappa Phi may get a 
new fraternity house through 
the KSU Foundation. 

The Foundation hopes to 
rezone pasture land on North 
Manhattan Avenue as greek 
housing, said Dave Weaver, 
vice president for real estate 
at the Foundation. This is 
pan of tentative long-term 
planning, and it won't 
happen overnight, he said. 

"I feel we will be able to 
accomplish it, but we're in a 
very preliminary Mage." he 
said. "It's not a done deal," 

The fraternity's original 
house was destroyed by fire 
June 29. 1991. The Riley 
County Police Department is 
still investigating the fire and 
did not wish to comment on 
ihe cause. 

Pi Kappa Phi faculty 
adviser Tim Lindemuth said 
the members would like to 
replace ihe former 37-man 
house with a 60-man house, 
hut ihe city will nol allow 
such an expansion on the 
original site. 

The fraternity has made a 
proposal to K-State lhat calls 



for the creation of a new 
greek housing district. 
Lindemuth said. Weaver said 
K-State then requested that 
the Foundation take over the 
project. 

Weaver said there are 
many time-consuming 
details. 

"The zoning would be 
changed. There would be 
new construction of streets, 
and all the utilities would 
have to be made available 
for the new residences," 
Weaver said. 

Weaver said the North 
Manhattan site is an 
excellent one. 

"It's beautiful, close to 
campus, and close to other 
greek houses," he said. 

Members of Pi Kappa Phi 
are currently living in 12 
four-bedroom apartments at 
1700 N. Manhattan Ave. 

They moved to the 
apartments after living in 
Marian Hall last year. 

"We didn't like the 
confinement of Marlatt," 
■ See PI KAPS page 10 




J, KVU WTATT'Cotogian 

The PI Kappa Phi house on Falrchfkl Avenue burned 
injur* 1001. 



'I 

i 2 Se P tember 2, 1092 



r 



< 






i 



! ,i 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



SOCIETY 



J 



I 3 

For you, the reader 

Society is a new Collegian section devoted to reporting ceremonies, 
parties or events that have already happened — any cause for celebration. 

Similar to small town society pages, this is where you do the reporting. 
Tell us the lowdown on what happened, and let us tell everybody else. 

Look for the pink forms outside Kedzie 1 1 8 next to the bulletins. Have 
your ID checked and drop the form in the bulletins box. Deadline is noon 
Tuesday, and items will be published on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Society will appear every Wednesday on page 2. 






POLICE RE PORTS 

^mmmtm — aa—aaa— a— MW— i wi i n i m iii i i i nmin im— iwwwp^i—lijfcillww 

K-STATE POLICE 

These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the KSU Police 
Depart meni. Because of incomplete information in the log, not all campus 
crimes are listed here. 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 MHBaHBSHBaHBI 



At 915 s.m., monay waa reported 
stolen from Jardlne Tarraea 

Apartments 

RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



At 2:45 p.m., pure* waa raporlad 
(oat at Wast Hall or tot B-2. Loss waa 

$60. 



WTiat It to For 

'PAST stents, pa rites 
functions, reunions. 

enoBOBcnerts. 
andtMlfca 



Society 



n*i*r* 



What It to Not For 

"Personals 
'Announeamarti 



*rou, h»i 



or Wwwui grow you bMaaj B 
mi tamy at 4S-f>S66 



B>m»i OmctM Kiiv«y, namaa. <ft. (Mac* 



TOUR NAME: 



Tocmmomr »; 



TODArSDATX: 



What It to For 

'PAST events, parties, 

functions, reontons, ceremonies, 
engagements, iweddmgs. births 
and me Mae 



Society 



What It to Mot For 

"Personals 
'Announcements' 



■Tee It la Pot 



"YOU ifia mow. and art) formal or 
For ntormawn. contact eia Coaaoujn 

Braliy Orx'tr >cnv»», "ami, aati. dace: 



group vou Belong K) 
«Mor at S33-6SS6 



YOLK NAME: 



tour phone •: 



TODArS DATE: 



• 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 



The Kanjat Staia Cotiao*n [USPS »' CrZOi • ttuoam ntifspapar m. Kansat Slaw Uw«vw» 4 
puWVea uy Smaent PtAacasoot Inq . Kettw Mad 103. Manhattan. K«n eeSOs Tha Cowg>ir i 
put* dad aaaWar* dunng ma Know rear and once t wee* tttrougn tha wtm* Second oiu 
pottage * pert at Mennattan. Kan 66502 

POSTMASTER Sana KMnmcfwigM 10 Kantai Sum Coaaguvi Circulation aa* Kadi* tQ3 
UanrujRan.Kan 86606'' 67 

Mem contnouhcrj *it at accepted t» IKepnont [St 3' $32-6566 or at tha Cotagian nanareom 

».*es a spur aflvarti».no tnayia m ovaewa to »t J| 



inqunai concerning local, national met c 






These reports are taken directly from the daily log of the Riley County 
Police Department. Because of space constraints, not all crimes appearing 
in the log are published. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 31 



« 



At 2:30 p.m., Bradley L. Scott, 
-S McCormick. Fort Riley, waa 
arrested lor felony theft end confined 
in lieu of $1,000 bond. 

At 4:07 p.m., Sara Banner, 618 
Oaaga St., reported the theft of ■ lo- 
gin's road master bicycle. Lou 
•ML 



At 4:41 p.m., Carolyn K. 
1412 Given* Road, reported a 

damaged vehicle window. Loaa waa 
$500. 

At 8:21 p.m., Jerry Housh, 1858 
Ctafiin Road, No. 4, advlaad there 
were several juvenile s ub jects telling 
magazine* to win a trip. 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 



At 10:02 a.m., Lloyd G Brlatow, 
1916 Bluetlem Terrace, reported the 



theft of mlaceltaneoue power and 
I MM, 



DID WE MAKE A MISTAKE? 

We do not claim to be perfect, so help us out. If you find an 
inaccuracy in the paper, give us a call or drop by the office so 
we can make a correction. 532-6556 « KEDZIE 116 



Have a question about today's Collegian? 

Give us a call, and welt try to help you out. I 



i CAMPUS BULLETIN 1 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 MHBBMaMMMeHMMHEMBBMM 

■ 'Preparing for the Law School Admission Test" will be at 10:30 
a.m. in Union 204. 

■ Sailing Club will meet at 7 p.m. in Union 206. 

■ United Black Voices will meet at 7:30 p.m. in the ECM building. 
New members and musicians welcome. 

■ Southwind will meet at 7 p.m. in Union 208. 

■ Graduate Student Council will meet at 4 p.m. in Union 203. All 
registered graduate student groups should send a representative. 

■ Career Planning and Placement will sponsor a job-search 
meeting at 3:30 p m. in Union Little Theatre for seniors in the 
colleges of Business. Engineering and Architecture. 

■ CNS will sponsor a lecture on using the Xedit editor on the 
University's mainframe from 1 1 :30 a.m. to 1250 p.m. in Cardwell 
103 and from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m. in Cardwell 102. 

■ CNS will sponsor a lecture on using the CMS system on the 
University's mainframe from 2:30 to 320 p.m. in Cardwell 102. 

■ Intramural soccer officials will meet at 6:30 p.m. in Union 213. 

■ Intramural flag football begins at 4:30 p.m. at the Rec Complex 
play fields. 

■ The Graduate School has scheduled the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Mary Stewart for 3:30 p.m. in Ackert 221 . 

■ U-LearN will have volunteer training at 4 p.m. in Holton 16. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 -MMMMBBMaMBMMMMMMMMU 



■ Intramural soccer captains will meet at 8 p.m. in Union 213. 

■ Intramural individual sports begin at 8 p.m. at the Rec 
Complex. 

■ Career Planning and Placement will sponsor a job-search 
meeting for seniors in the College of Human Ecology at 3:30 p.m. in 
Justin 256. 

■ Career Planning and Placement will sponsor a job-search 
meeting for seniors in the College of Arts and Sciences at 12 30 
p.m. in Union 207. 



WEATHER 



YESTERDAYS HIGHS AND LOWS 



TODAY'S FORECAST 

UA 30-percent chance tor morning showers and thunder- 
storms. Otherwise parity cloudy and warm. Htgh in the 
mid -80s South wind shifting to the northwest at 10 to 20 
mph by afternoon. Tonight, mostly dear. Low in the mid-60s. 

TOMORROW'S FORECAST 

Mostly sunny and continued warm. High in the upper 80s 



EXTENDED FORECAST 

I Friday through Sunday A chance for showers and 

j thunderstorms statewide on Saturday, otherwise dry. Highs 

] in the 80s Lows in the 60s. 



GOODLAND 
75/56 


• 


MANHATTAN 

81/64 

RUSSELL 


TOPEKA * 

kamsa! 

CITY 


GARDEN CITY 

4 86/62 


84/62 

WICHITA 

83/67 


80/66 

COFFEYVILLE 

83/68 



WORLD TEMPERATURES 



crrv 

Athens 



97,72 



SKY 

dear 



London 



63/50 



dear 



Bermuda 
Frankfurt 



67,78 



63/48 



ram 



, Moscow 


86/63 


dear 


| Rio 


91/63 


cloudy 


Vienna 


68/57 


rain 



UPC 

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L i 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



CAMPUS 



September 2, 1992 O 



» 

1 



■ 



Engineering gets 
funding for new 
undergrad library 



The College of Engineering has 
received $2.5 million to create an 
undergraduate library. 

Alice Fiedler of St. Petersburg, 
Fla .. made the donation. 

"Alice Fiedler's gift will allow 
our College of Engineering to have 
an outstanding, state-of-the-art 
library," Dean Donald Rathbone 
said. "The library will supplement 
our excellent academic programs 
and help us to better educate our 
undergraduates. We are eternally 
grateful for Fiedler's generosity." 

Fiedler previously gave 
$500,000 to create an endowed 
engineering professorship. The gifts 
have created trusts with the KSU 
Foundation. 

The gifts are memorials to 
Fiedler's husband, George, a K- 
State engineering graduate. George 
Fiedler died in 1988. He specialized 
in the design of instrumentation, 
automatic controls and data 
handling systems, and he worked in 
both the private sector and with the 
government. 

The library will be named the 
George and Alice Fiedler Library 
and will be located in Durland Hall. 

As a new building, it is part of 
the Durland Phase II and will 
continue into Phase 111. Rathbone 
said. The phases detail the 
continuing expansion of the hall. 

"We are in the preliminary 
stages of the project." Rathbone 
said. "We are working with 
concepts and plans produced by one 
of the K-State architectural 



engineering studios last spring, 

"Eventually, we will be making 
some decisions," Rathbone said. 
"Then, we will work with a 
professional design firm." 

K-State President Jon Wefald 
said the new engineering library is 
an important step to improving the 
University's library system. 

Rathbone said Farrell's 
expansion project is going to have a 
tremendous effect on the 
engineering library, and the two 
will work together often. 

"I feel our new library will allow 
Farrcll some flexibility related to 
engineering." Rathbone said. "It 
will also help them with more 
space." 

Brice Hn brock, dean of libraries, 
said, "Dean Rathbone and I both 
agree thai the new engineering 
library should be part of the KSU 
library system. It should be 
considered as another professional 
library, like our architecture and 
vet-med libraries." 

The library will be a good 
influence for the students in the 
engineering college. Hobrock said. 

"However, it will not be 
convenient for everyone." Hobrock 
said. "We want to install an 
electronic system in this library as 
well as the others to help minimize 
the inconvenience of finding 
information." 

Rathbone said the library will be 
larger than the other branch 
libraries because money is not a 
problem at this time. 

Rathbone said no project 
deadlines have been set. 



Dancing to a different tune 




MARGARET CLAJtKM Co«*»an 

Achmed Valk, dance program director, shows with his arms the position the dancers' legs should be in during a ballet class Tuesday 
afternoon In an Abeam Gymnasium studio. Valk, who haa been dancing for 28 years, just finished his first week as the new dance director. 



Valk says growth 
likely in program 



Collefitn 

One K-State department is 
dancing to a different tunc this 
year. 

Achmed Valk. new K-State 
dance program director, said he 
forsees growth and development 
in the upcoming year, 

"The dance department is very 
good. That's why I said yes to the 
job," Valk said. 



Originally from Germany, 
Valk began dancing at the age of 
12. At 18. he joined his first 
professional dance company. 

After dancing for two years 
with a company in France, he 
traveled with a show to Las 
Vegas, where he taught dance in a 
professional studio. 

Valk then joined the 
Sacramento Ballet Co. in 
Sacramento, Calif., and received 
his master's in Tine arts from the 
University of California at Irvine 

"Students seem more motivated 



in Kansas," Valk said. "Maybe 
there is less distraction here." 

One weakness of the current 
dance program is the low number 
of males involved in the program. 
Currently, there arc only three 
male dancers, and Valk said he 
hopes to have the opportunity to 
recruit and promote dance as a 
respectable profession for men. 

Valk said his long-term goal 
for the dance program is for it to 
become its own college. 

"The program can only grow in 
relation to funding." Valk said. 



Presently, there are 16 dance 
majors in the department. 

Valk said his short-term goal is 
to deliver high-quality dance 
programs. 

"I would like to renew ideas on 
the vision of the dance program," 
he said. 

Michelle Peters, sophomore 
and former dance major, said she 
believes Valk will benefit the 
dance program. 

"The dance department needs 
a change." Peters said. 



University offers students services to aid with job hunt 



i 



REBECCA OUVA> 

Collegia* 

Getting a job may prove difficult 
for the college student, but there is 
help. 

One of the first places students 
should look is the job board in the 
K-State Union, said Larry Moeder, 
director of Student Financial 
Assistance. 

The board is updated daily and 



contains job opportunities from 
various offices on campus and in 
the community. A student may also 
go to any department on campus to 
apply for a job. The classified ads in 
the Collegian are also great place to 
look. Moeder said. 

"There are two types of campus 
employment," Moeder said. "There 
is college work-study and campus 
payroll. One may be awarded 



college work-study after filling out 
the ACT Family Financial 
Statement. Work-study is awarded 
based on financial need." 

Moeder said students should be 
aggressive about applying for jobs. 

"It is important thai applicants 
dress appropriately, prepare a brief 



resume with past work experiences 
and present themselves in a positive 
way, because there is going to be a 
lot of competition." he said. 

There is also help at the Career 
Planning and Placement Center in 
Holtz Hall. 

"The center will provide 



assistance to students finding on- 
and off-campus employment," said 
Trace y Fraser. assistant director of 
the center. 

The center was formed through a 
grant provided by the Educational 
Opportunity Fund. 

"We are very excited to be 



serving the campus and the 
community and ail parties 
involved," Fraser said. "We have 
numerous other services that people 
can be tapping into prior to getting 
their degree " 



When it just can't 
get any worse 

AND YOU THINK NO ONE CARES 

Experience the Incredible 

Receive lite UapUsm of the Holy Ghost 




When Jesus Christ is born in your heart and life. 

It la an amazing, wonderful, glorious, 

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It will be your moment of 

ULTIMATE DELIVERANCE * 

Experience HIM today! 

WE CARE 



1 S0OS36-*OU 



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Skydive? 

You bet! 

Learn how with the 
K-State Parachute Club 



General Information 
Meeting 

7 p.m. Wednesday 
Sept. 2 Union 212 



FIRST JUMP CLASSES 

Sept. 11-12 
Sept. 18-19 
Sept. 25-26 

For more Information/to reserve 
guaranteed seat 

Call 776-3078 




There's a kit more than a great 
calculator watting for you when 
you purchase an HP 48SX or an 
HP48S between June 1, 1992, 
and October 31, 1992. Youll get 




a bonus book that's gr*od for free 
software, a free PC link cable 
and hundreds of dollars back 
on applications - like electrical 
and mechanical engineering - 
memory cards, training tools, 
games, and HPs infrared printer. 

Its a really big offer. Worth more 
than $500 And it's going to 
make your HP 48 calculator even 
more valuable to you. The tree 
serial cable lets you exchange 
information with your PC. And 
the free software disk lets you 
enter and plot equations easily, 
do 3D plotting, and analyze 
polynomials. 

C (WK tt***4i f*rk*nl r.«i*any Mi 123MB 



Beyond all the bonuses, youll 

have the right calculator for 
your most challenging classes. 
HP 48 calculators have over 
2100 built-in functions and 
offer a unique combination of 
graphics and calculus. 

Head over to the campus book- 
store now. After all, you dont 
see this kind of deal every day 
HP calculators. The best for 
your success. 



HEWLETT 
PACKARD 





PINION 



ORIAL B 



OARD 



The opinions expressed In "In Our Opinion" are (he opinions of a majority of Editorial Board 
members. These views do not necessarily represent the views of Kansas State University, Student 
Publications Inc. or the A.Q Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communicafont. 



Samantha Branson Erin Perry Richard 'Andradc John Han 

Edftor <n CWeT Amy Co* Jodell Lamer Tom Utter 

Shawn Bruce David Mayes Mart Engter 
Jared Savage pranj, Klecmann Derek Thoman David Fillipi 

Qp*tan Pwg* ■ *** BnanAndenon Julie Long Marti Oiscobe 



Coturnw are *W oplrvona o> 
only the ootwrnW. They do not 
reflect the views ot Ih* Kansas 
State Coesoian. but irweed oner a 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



w 



In Our Opinion 



By the Collegian Editorial Board 



Bikers' needs must be heeded 



THE ISSUE 

Ttw>r» is a lack 
of adequate 
facilltie* 
for bicyclists 



WE SUGGEST 

Mora biking 
paths and 
increasing the 
currant ones, 
mora bike 



awareness of 
bicycle safety 
rules. 



It's a given that many college campuses 
have parking shortages. 

But a bicycle parking shortage is ridiculous. 

Bike racks all over campus from McCain 
Auditorium and the K- State Union to Card well 
Hail are usually filled to capacity. 

Given no choice, a number of riders are 
forced to chain their bikes to trees, fences and 
handicapped railings. Then, they receive tickets. 

We already have an automobile parking 
problem on campus. The administration has 
shown it lacks either the money or the desire to 
fix the problem. 

Riding bicycles to class should be 
encouraged. However, the current 
accommodations made for cyclists are poor at 
best. 

Bicycle routes are few and far between. 
Often, they follow the steepest hill slopes and 
heaviest traffic patterns. 

Many riders use sidewalks instead, risking 
the safety of pedestrians. 

The problem can be fixed with only small 
changes. 

First, allow for some of the larger and 



heavily ridden sidewalks to contain a foot or so 
for bike paths. 

Good examples are the sidewalks on the 
south and northeast sides of McCain. The widths 
allow for the addition, and the traffic organization 
would be a welcomed change for riders and 
pedestrians alike. 

Secondly, purchase additional bike racks for 
areas on campus where the racks are often full. 
For example, the racks around Eisenhower Hall. 

With all the engineering and design students 
on campus, surely we could have both functional 
and artistically original bike racks for practically 
nothing. 

Finally, inform bicycle riders of the policies 
changed for their benefit with brochures at 
enrollment or at a Union display (able. Remind 
them of the laws that govern them. Many 
bicyclists break the law because of ignorance, not 
delinquency. 

The changes would be welcomed by riders 
and pedestrians. And. they would be a simple and 
cost-effective way for the administration to show 
the University cares about those who bike to 
campus. 



TOLES 



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Leftover fees not for Senate fun 



Rent, phone bills and utilities 
pillage my checkbook. Ah. the 
high-finance college way of life. 

While I and many others toil in 
the financial woes the first of the 
month bestows, our beloved 
Student Senate was frolicking in the 
wilds of Camp Wa-shun-ga this 
weekend. 

A bill has been proposed that 
would use leftover student fees to 
absorb part of the cost of the trip. 
The bill passed its first reading, and 
it will be voted on Thursday. 

This retreat was supposed to 
expediate and facilitate the "getting- 
to-know-you process." This was 
accomplished through playing 
cards, taking sun-drenched canoe 
rides and roasting weenies around a 
bonfire. 

Now they return tanned, rested 
and cohesive. We can expect great 
things from this year's Senate, 
knowing they have all been 
properly socialized and acquainted 
at our expense. What do they think, 
students are made of money? That 
stuff doesn't grow on trees, you 
know. 

The portion they want to pay for 
— $595 — works out to about $8 
per senator. If used properly, that 
can lead to quite a bit of fun. 

For instance, one local drinking 
establishment offered] $.75 cans of 
beer this last weekend. After a little 
math, that equates to just more than 



10 beers per senator. One can only 
imagine the creative policies they 
could come up with after a few 
beers, much less 10. 

Or maybe the movies are your 
thing. With $8, not only could you 
see a show, but hell, there would 
even be 
enough left 
over for 
treats. How 
often does 
that happen? 

The 
possibilities 
are endless. 
It is such a 
great idea, 
this whole 
"getting 
acquainted" 
thing. If 
only we all 
could enjoy 
the same 
luxury. 

Say you're feeling a little lonely 
and want lo bond with about 70 
different people? We could saunter 
off to the Student Governing 
Association offices in the K State 
Union and ask for our own bonding 
allowance. 

From around the back would 
come Student Body President 
Jackie McClaskey sporting a 
chipper smile and toting the Student 
Government bank-deposit bag. 




KELLY 

Klawonn 



Dipping into the bag, she would 
hand over some cash and say, 
"Happy bonding, my friend." 

Oh, if only we were so fortunate. 

Individual socialization subsidies 
might not work as well as an all- 
campus shindig. 

Taking into consideration the 
fiscal woes of higher education, we 
would have to keep costs down — 
as I am sure our beloved Senate did. 
Students could assemble in 
Memorial Stadium, play games and 
tell ghost stories. 

We could have potato-sack races 
and duck -calling contests during the 
day. At night, everyone could sit 
around a bonfire, munch on Always 
Save cheese puffs and drink Shasta 
chocolate soda. 

But the chance of that happening 
is about as likely as students being 
able to smoke in the Union again. 
So. we are left to our own devices 
of paying bills, meeting people and 
subsidizing the social life of student 
senators. 

Since it is our money they use, I 
think I must offer a few funding 
alternatives. 

One would be a bake sale in the 
Union. There are plenty of hungry 
people with money to bum loitering 
about the premises. Besides, with 
Union prices so inflated, it leaves 
the door open for some serious 
price wars, which in turn will 
stimulate spending and get the 



economy going. 

Another possibility would be 
senators donating plasma to help 
underwrite their bonding desires. It 
only takes about one hour per 
donation, and a person can give 
twice in a week. The reward for this 
is not only a great deal of social 
pride but also $25. One can only 
imagine what torrid exploits are 
elected representatives could get 
themselves into with that kind of 
dough. 

Yet another possibility is the 
garage sale. A bit boring and 
cliche', but dependable nonetheless. 
Besides if memory serves there is 
plenty of old furniture looking for a 
nice home. 

If all else fails, there is always 
the car wash thing. It worked 
wonders for my high school drill 
team, which didn't have a lick of 
talent but seemed to have plenty of 
money. Sound familiar? Senate 
could spend one Saturday a 
semester washing the vehicles of 
those they serve. Outfitted in his 
dayglo Spccdo, Ed Sfcoog could 
flag down cars and cajole drivers 
into a nice scrub and shine. 

Or maybe Senate could just meet 
people without having to trot off to 
the wilds surrounding Junction 
City. Maybe, just maybe, they 
could plan policies, draw up 
resolutions and divvy out funds, 
because that's their job. 



Readers Write 



► RELIGION 



Having true faith in 
God is all or nothing 

Editor, 

Recently, a letter was sent to 
the editor boasting that 95 
percent of Americans believe in 
God. But. I would like to ask 
the author if this is supposed to 
mean anything. 

If this statistic is supposed to 
make us assume that 95 percent 
of Americans are "Christians," 
then I beg you to open your 
eyes a little and look around. 
Do you see 95 percent of 
Americans standing up for 
godly principles such as love, 
joy. peace, goodness and self- 
control (Gal. 5:22). or do you 
see most of them demanding 
their freedom to practice sexual 
immorality, hatred, jealousy, 
selfish ambition, drunkednness, 
murder, malice, gossip and 
disobedience to their parents 
(Gal. 5:19-21 and Rom. 1:29- 
31)? 

Do you think that 95 percent 
of Americans actually believe 
that Jesus Christ is really God's 
son, who really was born of a 
virgin, ro^e from the dead and 
has the power to save people 
from eternal death for their 
sins? Or do you think most 
Americans could even admit 
that they are sinners and have a 
need for a savior? 

As I look around, i see the 
majority of Americans not only 
showing by their words and 
actions that God and his 
principles have no place in 
their lifestyles, but I also see 
them putting down, stepping on 
and ridiculing those people 
who actually do believe in the 
authority of the Lord Jesus 
Christ and the infallibility of 
God's word. 

I've met so many 
"Christians" who don't think 
it's necessary to take God's 
word to heart and don't even 
believe the Bible as truth. I 
urge those people to take a look 
at the basic foundations of the 
faith they claim and then ask 
themselves why they don't 
adhere to it. 

And for those of you who 
say, "I don't believe in God. 
Isn't that all that matters?" I 



urge you to read the second 
chapter of James. And pay close 
attention lo Chapter 19: "You 
believe that there is one God. 
Good! But even the demons 
believe that — and shudder." 

Jennifer Wilt 

Sophomore/ 

Social work 



► SOAP OPERA 

Other cultures 
offended by 'Days' 

Editor, 

In the last couple years, there 
has been much emphasis placed 
on K-State's cultural diversity, 
and we've found that 
encouraging. We have 
participated in events to further 
awareness of and appreciation 
for other cultures. 

Also, we have contributed 
our time, talent and money to 
Racial/Ethnic Harmony Week 
and the Multicultural Leadership 
Conference, among others. 

Perhaps you can imagine our 
shock, pain and dismay at seeing 
"'One Day to Live" in the 
Collegian. We are not amused at 
this pitiful attempt at humor It 
is not funny, and in fact, it 
rudely belittles others. If Sue 
Parmann were going to school in 
Russia and saw a similar piece 
about Americans, it would 
probably elicit the same reaction 
our Russian students must be 
having. 

If our goal is world peace and 
understanding. "One Day to 
Li\e" is not a positive step in 
that direction. Unfortunately, 
there are many people who have 
only one day to live because of 
aggression and oppression. If 
there is humor in that, we fail to 
see it. 

We ask that you stop running 
this ridiculous soap opera, and if 
it continues to appear in the 
Collegian, we will take it as 
further evidence of your 
dedication to provincialism and 
bigotry. 

Kuppasamy Ra vindran 

Motaz Hourani 

Kouassi Kouakou 

Jing Zeng 

Officers of the International 

Coordinating Council 



TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR POLICY 

We would like to hoar 
what you trunk. Send your 
comments, criticisms and 
complaints to us 

Please include a phone 
number so we can get in 
louch with you in case there 
are questions concerning your 
letter 

Before letters are printed 
in the Cotlegian, we need to 
see a picture ID Letters 

submitted may be edited for COWE BY KEDZ1E 1 1 6 OR 
grammar and length T**E M TO: 

We cannot guarantee thai ffljJJjBJ" 
vour mm w,H run, txitwe w,„ ^SS^^^ 
try to make sure a sampling of Ke62io Hat , ^ , 6 
both sides ol an issue get into Manhattani Kan. 66506 
the Collegian 




Other Views 



r> PRESIDENTIAL RACE 



Bush did not crush the communist regime 

OK, let's get one thing straight: 

George Bush had nothing to do with the fall of communism in the 
Sov iet Union and Eastern Europe. 

This observation is necessitated by the Republican convention, 
which got off to a rousing sun by. among other things, crediting 
George Bush with being the savior of freedom. 

The Berlin Wall fell in 1 989. the very year Bush took office. You 
cannot possibly see a connection between these two events, unless 
you are passionately determined to. 

And the fall of the Berlin Wall was the symbolic proof that it was 
over for the communists. It showed beyond a doubt that the Soviets 
had no thoughts of trying to step in to save communism in Eastern 
Europe. 

It is astounding that people would try to rewrite history that is so 
recent. What are they thinking? That nobody will know what they 
are talking about? 

Dayton (Ohio) Dally News 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

academics mammm 



September 2, 1992 R 

*■«■■■■■«■■■■■■» ^gj? 



Entry-level classes spark concern among students 



■JHP 



Students question 

grading standards 



ROYQRABER 



Catkin/. 

Some students question whether 
entry-level classes with many 
different instructors have equal 
grading standards. 

Every student pursuing a 
bachelor's degree is required to take 
Expository Writing I, Public 
Speaking [ and Principles of 
Physical Fitness. There are also 



many students taking College 
Algebra, Macroeconomics, General 
Psychology and Intro to Sociology. 
Because of this, the University has 
to offer a number of different 
sections with different teachers. 

Many students feel that it is 
unfair to have the range of class 
sections and teachers. 

"In English (Expository 
Writing), different teachers seem to 
have a different emphasis," said 
John Zwonitzer, sophomore in 
agronomy. "Some will place a lot 



on spelling, others will place more 
on punctuation, but 1 think they alt 
are pretty equal in wanting your 
grammar to be correct." 

Dave Smit, associate professor 
of English and director of the 
freshman writing program, said he 
agreed that teachers often focus on 
different areas, but said the general 
requirements of both levels of 
Expository Writing are equal. 

"The different types of papers 
they have to write is the same, the 
amount of writing assigned is the 



same, and everybody has to pass a 
portfolio," Smit said. 

Smit said the English department 
has various ways to ensure they 
teach all students fairly. 

Instead of having all of a 
student's material graded by the 
same teacher, the portfolio is graded 
by different members of the English 
department. 

He also said before the semester 
begins, teachers go through a 
training program that teaches model 
ways to design a course. 



Nancy Goulden, professor of 
speech, said complaints of 
inequality are also common with 
Public Speaking 1 students. 

"I'm sorry to say that these 
students have a legitimate 
complaint," Goulden said. "In 
reality, different teachers grade 
differently and will have different 



However, we try to maintain an 
equal system by having uniform 
assignments. 

"To have every class the same 
just doesn't happen. Students get 
really focused on the grade, when, 
in a more perfect world, the 
students would look at it for the 
experience," 



Canada extends benefits to homosexuals 



ASSOCIATED 



TORONTO — The Ontario 
government received orders 
Tuesday to extend survivor benefits 
to the partners of gay and lesbian 
government employees. 

An independent board of 
inquiry, appointed under the 
Ontario Human Rights Code, made 
the decision and was immediately 
heralded by gay* rights activists. 



"It's a historic day for the 
province," said Michael Leshner, a 
Ministry of the Attorney General 
lawyer. 

In a 2-1 decision, the board ruled 
that although the denial of benefits 
was allowed under the provincial 
human-rights code, it violated the 
equality guarantee of the federal 
Charter of Rights. 

Leshner brought his case to the 
Ontario Human Rights Commission 



in 1988 after he was told his partner 
of seven years was not covered 
under the government's dental and 
health insurance plans. 

Effective January 1991. the 
provincial government extended 
health and dental insurance 
coverage to the partners of 
employees in same-sex 
relationships. 



The K-State Union Bookstore presents 

COMPUTER FAIRE 

September 1 & 2 10 «un. to 3 p.m. 
K-State Union Courtyard 



You* 11 be amazed by the latest technology 



at-l 



The 
Sport Sandal, 




All Tmain 

Universal 

• Soft nvktn 
straps 

• Arch wjppufl 

• ComHjrtabkf 
tcrurttir 

• Easy on and off 

• All TrtMirt sot 




Rthfmp 



304 Poyntz*Oowntown 
Mon-Fri 9-6 
Thurs 9-8 
Sat 9-5 

Phone 539-5639 



Soccer Officials Needed 



Soccer Clinics: Wednesday, September 2. at 6:30 p.m. 
K-State Union. Room 213 

Thursday, September 3 at 5 p.m. 
Memorial Stadium 

'Attendance is Mandatory for all meetings!* 

Starting Pay: $4.50/ hour 

(more for experienced officials) 



Call Rec Services Office for details 
532-6980 



Positions Available 



?£^ S.G.A. 




•AJ-Larrje Staring Commfle* Members 
-taadwK Maws & Umvaraty Rataws 
-Commncatttu 
ABM 



SmtSamftxtyPrasdanriCabngt Sudani Sanate 

•AS K. Campus CNredw 

•iniematonal Allan Oreaw 
Educator* Opporutfy Fund Ccmmfflee Memcer s 
UnverUy AcftAH Board Utffltwrt 
Hgfi Stfoa uatOnhQ Corr>*w>cs Coorttnator 
MtWInfc 

•Pirtang CttBon Appeals Board 

-Tnbunaf (raaomct hat) 
UnMniy CommBHt: 

•Parting, TrtSc, a Paw Oparttont 

-HgtaHtfCound 
Applications are available in the Student Government Office, ground floor, 
K-State Union and are due September 9 1992 by 5 p.m 



-Senakt Oparatons 
■SfadartAlm S Sooal Services 



Plus over S2,00H in software w ill be given away. Register lor our Daily Draw trigs! 



1 iMlUring l ixill l urn I Mil i I I I nt, 

"'K-State Union 



Bookstore 532-6583 



Yrlo* t \1ji Si hi u i' i \f>pk'i. t bn* jnd man'. 



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ALPHA GAMMA RHO 



Pi KAPPA ALPHA 




BEACH BASH '92 

The men of Mpfa Gamma Rho and Pi Kappa Alpha would like to rhand the 
lo-k/wtna sororihes and fraternities for their participation in Beach Bash 

•92: AX£l IK 

ASA AIO 

XQ KZ 

AAA AXA 

roe I4»E 

KA Fiji 

rat* 

Congratulations to this year's winners: 

xn * ai<d 

Add a special thanks to the Beauty and the Beast 
participants: 

Iff AXfi- Casev Ewy 1st aio- Cory Lons 

2nd £K- narviin Hetzet 2nd l«e- BnrKion Forceoors 

3rd aea- Sara Freeman 3rd ki- Pat Oirksen 

4fb x.j- Melissa Wells 4th Fiji- Jerrod Boms 

5th Aid- Melissa Moessner 
6th i*b- Moniooe Fourrtier 
7th ka- Wendy Richardson 
Sth MB*- Marilyn Hetzd 







The Cats Are Back 



1992 Student 
Season Tickets 

Football $35 each 
cats' home games Basketball $75 each 

Combination $95 each 

Saves You $15 




SEPT. 19 MONTANA 
*x30p.m. 



SEPT. 28 TEMPLE 

6:30 p.m. 



:3 N.MEXICO ST. 
12:30 pan. 



NOV. 5 IOWA ST. 

7 p.tn. 
ESPN 









NOV. 21 OKLAHOMA ST. 
1:10 p.m. 




PORTS 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




Stickball """"""^ 

Chris McGrath, Fort Riley, reaches out tor a catch during lacrosse practice Tuesday near Memorial Stadium. K -State has 20 members returning to the team. 



Chiefs chop chaps and chant 

6 more players cut from roster 




"We have 
some other 
guys with 
quite a few 
more 
catches 
than 

Stephone 
Paige." 

MARTY 
SCH0TTENHE1MER 



ASSOCIA TED PRESS 

KANSAS CITY. Mo. — The 
Kansas City Chiefs revealed six 
more cuts Tuesday to get down to 
their 47-man roster. 

Center Jay Leeuwenburg, 
offensive tackle Tom Dohring. 
cornerhack Tahaun Lewis, tight 
end Alfred Pupunu and linebacker 
Santo Stephens were waived. But 
the Chiefs said Leeuwenburg was 
claimed by the Chicago Bears and 
Pupuno by the San Diego Chargers 
soon after their release. 

"I think we're better now than 



we were," Chiefs coach Marty 
Schottenheimer said. "I think we 
have some players who have a 
chance of making us better ." 

Meanwhile, Troy Stradford. 
who led the Chiefs in punt returns 
last season, was claimed Tuesday 
by the Los Angeles Rams. The 
Chiefs said they were still awaiting 
word late Tuesday on whether 
wide receiver Robb Thomas, who 
led the squad in receptions a >ear 
ago. was claimed by another team. 

"If Robb isn't claimed, anything 
might happen." Schottenheimer 



said. "I'm not saying it's going to 
happen. ... If no one claims Robb. 
he becomes a free agent or a 
member of the Kansas City 
Chiefs." 

The waiving of Thomas means 
the Chiefs will go with three 
receivers with little or no NFL 
experience. Fred Tones has nine 
career receptions over three years, 
while Tony Hargain and Willie 
Davis, both in their second >ear, 
have yet to catch a ball in a regular 
season game. 

"We have some other guys with 



quite a few more catches." said 
Schottenheimer. who is still 
without unsigned veteran receiver 
Stephone Paige. 

Rookie linebacker Erick 
Anderson of Michigan was put on 
injured reserve Tuesday for the 
four -week minimum. He joins free 
agent linebacker William Kirksey. 
who was put on injured reserve 
Monday. 

Running back Christian Okoye, 
who signed late, was granted a 
roster exemption 



Tomahawk now a part of history 



Due to complaints, the 

cheer will no longer be 
encouraged in Arrowhead 



ASSOCIATED PRESS 



KANSAS CITY. Mo. — Responding to 
complaints from American Indians about fans 
doing the tomahawk chop, the Kansas City 
Chiefs and their sponsors say they will no 
longer encourage the cheer. 

But team officials also said they would not 
discourage fans from dressing up as Indians or 
organizing tomahawk -chop cheers on their own. 

Indian groups have campaigned against the 
chop, saying it is offensive to their culture. 

"We are just more or less discontinuing the 
promotion of it," said Bob Moore, Chiefs 
director of public relations. But, he added, "We 



will not censor the public." 

At games the last two seasons, team 
cheerleaders led fans in the arm-swinging 
motion simulating the use of a tomahawk. The 
cheer was accompanied by the stadium band 
playing a war -chant beat or graphics flashed on 
Arrowhead Stadium's giant screen. 

During last Friday's preseason game against 
the Indianapolis Colts, many fans still used the 
tomahawk chop, but the public address system 
did not provide a war-chant beat. 

American Indians staged several protests last 
year at Arrowhead and other stadiums 
nationwide. They also protested at Atlanta 
Braves and Washington Redskins games. 

Ellen Papineau. one of several local 
American Indians who protested at Arrowhead 
last season, said she is pleased about the 
changes. 

"I think it is great that we are making people 



she 



rethink things that had become automatic' 
said. 

But Papineau, of the Winnebago tribe, said 
she is concerned that many sports fans still 
think of American Indians as mascots or 
cheerleading symbols. 

Corporate sponsors of the Chiefs, including 
Price Chopper food stores and the Jones Store 
Co., said they will not promote the chop. 

Last year's Price Chopper commercial 
enticed fans to chop as they chanted: "Chiefs 
and Chopper. Chiefs and Chopper." 

The new Price Chopper commercial has a 
more singsong version that used the chorus: 
"PC. Chiefs. Chopper." 

"We tried to delete any references that would 
be offensive to anyone out there." said Maurice 
Henry, a Price Chopper spokesman. 



HUNTIN' 'N' FISHIN' 

Doves 

love 

dope 

"Weren't for doves. Noah wouldn't ha\t ever 
found land " — old Gnostic maxim. 

Hemp people perturb me. 

When a clearly stoned freak comes up and 
says, "Marihuana, which my people call hemp, 
should be legalized because you can make 
sweaters and carpet out of it," I'm a little leery. 

But when a dove-hunter tells me about hemp, 
1 listen. 

Mourning doves eat tons of dope seeds, 
according to a 1951 study by Golden Books 
editor and childhood hero Herbert S. Zim, Ph.D. 

During hunting season, doves spend 45 
percent of their feeding time in hemp fields. 
Twenty percent of fall doves roost in hemp 
fields, according to the study. 

Maybe the hemp-heads have it right. Maybe 
the state's desire to eradicate marihuana runs 
counter to maintaining suitable hunting 
populations of dove. 

And. it's not just doves. Dr. Zim says 
marihuana seeds account for 24 percent of the 
bob white quail diet. 

(Want to know how these Dr.s discover these 
things? They slit open the bellies of birds and 
stay up all night counting 
the contents, like that 
scene in "Jaws" where 
Richard Dreyfuss and Roy 
Scheider find an Ohio 
license plate and a human 
arm in a blue shark's 
belly.) 

Pheasant, an introduced 
upland game bird, feast 
mainly on corn, but Dr. 
Zim believes they 
frequently cat loco weed. 
(He cites no percentages 
here. Maybe he got tired 
of slicing up the birdies.) 




Skoog 



The classification of 
marihuana as a noxious 
weed and as a Class 1 drug make hemp fields 
fugitives from the law. When a field or even a 
plant is discovered, it is cut down and burned. 

Pals of mine have been fined out of college 
because they played Frisbee in a dope field. 
Farmer called the Hiawatha sheriff on 'em, 
biggest drug bust in years — two city boys 
frolicking by the highway. 

They don't arrest doves. Maybe they should. 
Imagine a reefer- frenzied flock of a thousand 
cooing doves. Imagine the crops lost each year to 
the munchies. 

Do doves get cottonmouth? Hard to say. But I 
do know this: When you're crouched by a pond, 
shotgun crooked in your armpit, you're readying 
yourself. You are a good shot, which does almost 
no good when the doves fly past. 

That zigzag pattern. Can't shoot them cleanly 
when they fly surprised. For 8 -ounce birds, they 
can maneuver like gazelles, or like ... like a drug 
freak. 

Drunkenness has been documented in cedar 
wax wings, titmice and other berry -eaters as the 
result of fermented berries. And then there's 
Aesop's crow, filling a wine bottle with pebbles. 

Not to side with Darwin, but getting high 
could be an evolutionary advantage. It would 
make them unpredictable and thus harder for the 
hunter to guess where and when to predate. 

So, patches of marihuana should be allowed 
to grow away from roads, and they should be 
supervised by the Fish and Game Commission to 
ensure a diversity of food sources for doves and 
other birds. 

But I still don't think it should be legalized. 
All the hemp sweaters I've seen look awful. 



SPORTS DIGEST 



► ROYALS WIN; BRETT 
PASSES THE MICK 

KANSAS CITM, Mo. (AP)— George 
Brett's single moved him past Mickey 
Mantle on the career RBI list and capped a 
four-run seventh inning Tuesday night that 
lifted Kansas City over Texas 8-3, 

Trying to break a 
personal five-game losing 
skid. Nolan Ryan struck 
out five and did not issue 
a walk. Ryan left after six 
innings with a 2 lead on 
Juan Gonzalez' American 
League- leading 39th 
home run 

But he was relieved 
starting the seventh by 
Todd Bums (3-5). and the Rangers 
proceeded to self-destruct. First Bums hit 
Brian McRae leading off, then Gary 
Thurman singled him to third. When David 
Howard lifted a routine fly ball to medium 
center, right fielder Jack Daugherty collided 
with center fielder Gonzalez, who dropped 
the ball as McRae scored 




►JOSE NOT HURRYING 
TO OET TO TEXAS 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Jose 
Canseco had been with the Texas Rangers 
less than 24 hours when the first hints of 
controversy wafted through the clubhouse 

Instead of hurrying to Kansas City to be 
with his new team, the former Oakland 
slugger sent word he would join the 
Rangers Thursday in New York, leaving his 
new bosses and teammates to explain his 
absence as no big deal. 

•What do you want me to say?* 
manager Toby Harrah told a questioner 
Tuesday as the Rangers dressed for a 
game against the Royals. 'You have a 
couple of days to report. You don't have to 
report the next flight out. I am very glad 
Jose Canseco is going to join us on our off 
day in New York. I honestly believe if Jose 
stays healthy, he's going to have some 
great years in Texas." 

Canseco, 28. was the centerpiece of a 
blockbuster trade for pitchers Jeff Russell 
and Bobby Witt and outfielder Ruben 
Sierra. 



FROM THE REC 



Rec Center releases IM rankings 



Sigma Phi Epsilon leads picks for men's 
flag football; Pi Beta Phi tops women's list 



MY AM SfUNNKft 



Colkfitn 

Pull the sneakers out of the closet 
and lace up those shoestrings. Another 
year of intramural s gets under way this 
week. 

More than 40 intramural sports will 
be open to K-State students, faculty and 
staff during 1992-93. Last year, more 
than 22,000 students, faculty and staff 
took advantage of the intramural 
programs. 

Beginning this fall, the Chester E. 
Peters Recreation Complex will feature 
a weekly ranking of the top intramural 
teams in flag football, soccer, 
volleyball, basketball and softball. 

The first poll is flag football. Sigma 
Phi Epsilon begins the season at the top 
spot after winning the all-University 
championship a year ago. The Sig Eps 
return six starters and are sure to make a 
strong challenge for that honor again. 

Quarterback Andy Meyer said he 



believes the team has more talent than a 
year ago. but. because of its youth, 
might lack experience. Look for the 
always tough Tau Kappa Epsilon team 
to make some noise of its own. 

Pi Beta Phi leads off the women's 
flag football poll after finishing last year 
undefeated and winning the title. The Pi 
Phis return a good portion of their team, 
including both running backs and the 
quarterback. Heather Smith, one of five 
returning seniors, said the team is 
excited to get the season under way. 

"One girl even quit her job so she 
could play." Smith said. 

The Sophomore Vets have a year of 
experience behind them. So, don't be 
surprised to see the Junior Vets in the 
top spot when the final whistle blows. 

After winning the soccer 
championship last season, Arabo will 
look to add another title to its name. Or. 
this could be the year of the Penetrators. 
who were beaten by Arabo in last year's 
semifinals. 



INTRAMURAL 
RANKINGS 

MEN'S FLAG FOOTBALL TOP 10 

1 Sigma Phi Epsilon 

2 Tau Kappa Epsiton 

3 PhiWadtaJacka 

4 Phi Gamma Delta 

5 Sigma Chi 

« Pi Kappa Alpha 

7 Haymakers 

8 Bombers 

9 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
10 Marfan 5 

WOMEHSFLAG FOOTBALL TOP 5 

i Pi Bate Phi 

2 Junior Vets 

3 Alpha Delta Pi 

4 Gamma Phi Beta 

5 Moore 7 

SOCCER TOPS 

1 Arabo 

2 Penetrators 

3 Sigma Chi 

4 Smith. Mouse 

5 Afro 92 

SHAME KEVtPtCoieaww 









KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



' < 



« 

i . 



. 



ENTERTAINMENT 



September 2, 1002 *J 



— 1_ 



Satire merges 
past with present 



Colltfun 

If you enjoy satirical parodies 
with a Woody Allen-flair for 
direction, "The Icicle Thief is the 
movie to see. 

This film is intentionally 
reminiscent of "The Bicycle 



Thief." from the first stage of 
realism with a modern day 
television studio to a quasi neo- 
realistic drama about an 
unemployed laborer, played by 
Maurizio Nichetti, who struggles 
to keep his family together in the 
aftermath of WWII. 

The movie is framed within a 
TV broadcast as the bushy-haired 
Nichetti plays the director during 
the first national broadcast of his 
film. "The Icicle Thief." From the 
moment he enters the TV studio, 
chaos reigns. He splashes paint on 
his already ripped clothing and 
loses his pants in the process. 

As the movie progresses into a 
third layer of reality, a con- 
temporary middle-class Italian 
family is halfheartedly viewing 
"The Icicle Thief on their living 



room TV set, 

Finally, the movie's fourth 
level is a series of full-color 
glossy commercial ads that 
periodically interrupt the telecast. 
This eventually leads to the 
massacre of the fuzzy black and 
white effect in which the poverty- 
stricken family lives. As the levels 
bleed into one another, the family 
escapes to a "better" life in 
colorful TV land. When this 
occurs, Nichetti enters the film's 
telecast in a frantic attempt locure 
the collapsing script. 

Nichetti outdoes himself by 
portraying many characters as 
well as merging the past with the 
present, black and while with 
color and reality in the film. 

"The Icicle Thief," in Italian 
with English subtitles, is serious in 
its theme, yet humorous in its 
satirical comedy approach. 
Nichetti keeps his audience 
entertained well with an almost 
Keystone Kops style of pace. 

The UPC Kaleidoscope film 
"The Icicle Thief will be 
showing tonight and Thursday at 7 
and 9:30 p.m. in Union Forum 
Hall, Admission is $1.75. 



BAR SCENE 



* 



Boulevards a new face in Aggieville 



Collegim 

Boulevards llth Street Bar and 
Grill, formerly the Spot, has been 
renovated, and the changes run 
much deeper than in name alone. 

Cosmetic changes throughout 
the interior of the building, as well 
as changes in basic business 
practices, have given a new attitude 
to the long-time Aggieville 
merchant. 

"The major problems we had 
were that the stage that the bands 
played upon was really nothing 
more than an extension of the dance 
floor, so we built a new stage, and a 
new dance floor," said Kevin 
Henao, Boulevards manager. 

"Then we took out some of the 
partition rails. This opened it up a 



lot and gave us more room. 

Henao also said one of the main 
complaints from people was that 
there was little ventilation for 
smoke. 

Therefore, he said, there has 
been a smoke-eater ventilation 
^ystem installed. 

"It makes an extremely big 
difference," Henao said. 

In addition to structural changes. 
Boulevards will expand its services, 
including expanding the bar staff 
and adding a kitchen that will serve 
dinner and break fasi. 

"The idea of serving breakfast is 
something that is totally new," 
Henao said. "Beginning at the 
regular closing lime, we will have a 
complete breakfast menu, with 
everything from sausage and eggs 
to biscuits and gravy, 



"You can get something to eat 
without drinking and driving," he 
said. "If you're coming from 
another bar, we will Mill be letting 
people in to eat." 

Live entertainment is also 
something that will change. 

"We are going to try to bring in a 
real mix of bands and. hopefully, 
some nationally known names." 
Henao said. 

"I have a personal relationship 
with many of the bands from this 
area, and we will still offer a lot of 
local entertainment 

"Something new that we want to 
try is special nights featuring a wide 
range of bands besides just rock *n' 
roll." he said. 

Henao also said he would like to 
bring in bands that play different 
styles of music. 



"We'd like to bring in country 
and western bands, and we have 
already booked a calypso band." 
Henao said. 

"Overall, we'd just like to take 
what has worked in the past and 
expand on the ideas." 

Upcoming acts include a 
California band known as the 
Brothers, the Texas rock *n' roll 
band No One, a blues band out of 
Chicago known appropriately as 
Blue and several local lineups. 

"Originally, the Spot had a very 
negative image, but we are trying to 
change all that now." Henao said. 
"The message that we are trying to 
get out is we want everybody. 

"I don't just want to see 
Boulevards busy. I'd like to see 
Aggieville busy." 



■COUPON' -■: 

KSU STUDENT SPECIAL 
WORLD'S GREATEST 

HAIRCUT 



Quayle 
campaign 
trail leads 
toKC 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Teachers program. 

The state-funded program sends 
volunteers into homes to train 
parents to do a better job of raising 
children from birth to age 5. 

About 7.5&0 families are being 
served by Parents as Teachers in 
Kansas City, coordinator Put 
Tcnnison said Tuesday. 

"I'm pleased he's coming here," 
Tennison said of Quayle. 
"Hopefully he'll learn about the 
concerns of families in today's 
world and how valuable this 
program is." 

Later Wednesday, Quayle is to 
speak at a luncheon sponsored by 
the Greater Kansas City Chamber 
of Commerce before leaving for 
Tulsa, Qkla. 

Several Southern states are 
viewed as competitive because of 
the sour economy and the 
Democrats' all-Southern ticket. 



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O September 2, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



COMPUTING 



ACADEMICS 






I 



Gallagher 
named 
to systems 
development 



Studio B remains empty as grant search goes on 



Coltejao 

Computer speed was about 30 
characters per second when Tom 
Gallagher began his job as director 
of K-State's Computing and 
Network Services. 

That was 22 yean ago. 

Today, computer speed is about 
120 characters per second, but 
Gallagher said it coutd reach 960 
characters by Christmas. 

Students used terminal labs 
rather than microcomputer labs, 
and the telephone system was not a 
part of the mainframe then, he said. 

As funds became available, the 
mainframe system was updated, 
and various connections were 
added to the computer terminals 
and microcomputers to allow 
individuals both on and off campus 
access to the computer's 
mainframe, he said. 

Several years ago, the telephone 
business was added to the 
mainframe by rewiring the campus 
and installing a phone switch, 
which allowed off -campus students 
to dial in to the modems on 
campus. 

Gallagher has been named 
director of systems development in 
the Provost's Office. Steve Welch 
will serve as interim director of 
CNS. 

In his new position, Gallagher 
will work in Farrell Library on 
various projects to implement 
future computer systems. He will 
also assist in the design of the 
library's extension with other 
libraries and the renovation of 
current library space. 

Robert Kruh. vice provost for 
academic services and instruction, 
said Gallagher was looking for an 
opportunity to become more 
directly involved with the computer 
system. Kruh said he will now have 
fewer administrative concerns. 

"At his request, we looked at 
some real needs the University has, 
and this really looked like an 
opportunity to take advantage of 
talents that he has in great depth," 
Kruh said. 

Those talents will be put to use, 
as Gallagher will assist in the 
planning of future NOTIS systems. 
NOTIS is the library's current 
system, introduced about three 
years ago, that allows students to 
locate a periodical or book quickly 
by doing a computer search that 
lists the call number and location. 

Gallagher said K-Statc has 
decisions to make about using new 
NOTIS products as they continue 
to be developed. 



Coltciim 

Purchase of equipment for Dole 
Hall's Studio B waits on federal 
grant money — for now. 

If equipment was available. 
Studio B would be used for video 
production classes by 

radio/television students in the A.Q. 
Miller School of Journalism and 
Mass Communications. 

"We continue to apply for grants 
and have dialogue with Sen. Bob 
Dole." said Mel Chastain, director 
of the Educational Communications 
Center in Dole Hall. "We are 
exploring all options. 

"Grantsmanship is part of 
regular life's work around here." 



Chastain said. "Some come 
through, and some don't." 

No grant money has become 
available thus far. 

"As far as I can tell you at the 
moment, nothing has changed, 
although we are still interested in 
getting it equipped," said Carol 
Oukrop, director of the journalism 
school. "We're hoping — we're 
praying — that federal funding will 
come through." 

The construction of Dole Hall 
was financed by a $5.9-million 
federal grant several years ago. Its 
primary purpose is to be a 
communications center for the 
Kansas Board of Regents. 

Dole Hall's Studio A, the 



Educational Communications 
Center, is fully equipped. 

Chastain said there are two four- 
hour labs for the radio/television 
students — one on Wednesday and 
one on Friday — in Studio A. It 
does not cost the journalism school 
anything to use this studio. 

Oukrop said the equipment in 
Studio A is state of the art. The 
equipment is the same used to 
transmit Spanish and French classes 
to high-school classrooms 
throughout Kansas and other states. 

If the journalism school were to 
pay for the use of the kind of 
equipment available in Studio A, 
Oukrop said, it could be estimated 
that it would cost about $50,000 a 



year. The lecture portions of 
radio/television classes are in 
Studio B. 

Oukrop said if federal funding 
does not come through, the 
journalism school will launch its 
own fund-raising effort to purchase 
equipment. 

She said, however, that if the 
school had its own campaign, 
quality studio equipment may not 
be the top priority. Instead, the 
school would try to purchase 
equipment benefiting all journalism 
and mass communications students. 
Students in the radio/television 
curriculum make up about 20 
percent of the journalism school, 
Oukrop said. 



The journalism school does own 
some of its own equipment, which 
is stored in McCain Auditorium. 

"It's pretty primitive — not top- 
of- the- line type of stuff," Oukrop 
said. "It's the best we've been able 
to do with the budget we have." 

Chastain said his department 
employs from 12 to 20 
radiotelevision students during a 
semester. 

He said the department benefits 
by having talented interns. 

"Obviously, we'd all like to have 
our own equipment, and we're 
working on that," Chastain said. "In 
the meantime, everyone is 
benefiting from the arrangement." 



STATE 



Kickapoo tribe shows interest in Wichita casino 



Leaders say they 
are examining 
project seriously 



WICHITA — Kickapoo Indian 
leaders may consider getting 
involved with a proposed hotel and 
casino complex in Wichita. 



An attorney for the Kickapoo 
tribe said Monday they would like a 
piece of the gaming pie in 
downtown Wichita if the state 
decides not to negotiate with an 
Oklahoma-based tribe involved 
with the project 

Lance Burr, attorney for the 
Kickapoo tribe, said the Kickapoos 
are interested in looking at the 
Wichita project very seriously, and 



that he has talked to the hotel 
developers about the possibility. 

Wichita developer George 
Laham and the Wyandotte tribe of 
Oklahoma are negotiating with the 
city and state to build Riverport 
Plaza, a SlOO-million convention 
hotel and casino complex proposed 
for the east bank downtown. 

David Elkouri, attorney for the 
developers, said he and Laham had 



approached the Kickapoos and 
other Kansas tribes about the 
Wichita project several months ago. 

Elkouri said Kickapoo leaders 
were not interested in a Wichita 
casino then, and that they said their 
first priority was a proposed casino 
in Hiawatha. 

But the ever changing issue of 
Indian gaming in Kansas has made 
Kickapoo leaders consider 



alternatives. Burr said. 

"Probably what happened was 
the Kickapoos were concentrating 
so hard on the Hiawatha situation 
that they just didn't think much 
about the (Wichita) proposal," Bun- 
said. 

The Legislative Coordinating 
Council, a group of legislative 
leaders, will meet with leaders of 
Kansas tribes on Sept. 9. 



Weekly Mediae 

Thursdays 

12:05 p.m. i p.m. 

1 .lU'iu' ik'.ilih iviik'i Room 231 

I'onitU'i [vi ^on I ok'i.i Sump 530 o3 

I Welcome Students, Faculty & Staff 

If yon feel yoat life has been affected by someone vise's drinking, you will be welcomed at an At Anon meeting. 



Intramural Deadline 



SWIM MEET 



Deadline: Friday, Sept. 4 

Entry: Rec Services Office at the Rec Complex 



Enter at the Rec Services Office 
532-6980 




STUDENT 

LOANS 




24 HOUR PROCESSING... 

STUDENT LOANS HAVE NEVER BEEN SIMPLER! 

Kansas State Bank is Ujc largest local student loan lender with over 
40,000 student loans processed! Let our professional in-housc start assist 

you with your ncxl student loan. 

LENDER CODE # 821176 

Kansas State Bank 

WcslUxip • Downtown • Aggicvillc • K-Statc Union, Mini mil. in, 537-4400 




■4 



Royal Purple 1 AAQ 


Acacia-Sept. 8 




Phi Kappa Theta-Sept. 29 


Alpha Chi Omega-Sept. 8-9 




Pi Beta Phi-Sept 29-30 


Alpha Delta Pi-Sept. 9-10 




Pi Kappa Alpha-Sept 30 


Alpha Gamma Rho-Sept 10-1 1 




Pi Kappa Phi-Sept 30 


Alpha Kappa Alpha-Sep:. 1 1 




Pi Kappa Theta-Sept 30-Oct 1 


Alpha Kappa Lambda- Sept. 1 1 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon-Oct 1 


Alpha Phi Alpha-Sept 1 1 




Sigma Chi-Oct 1 


Alpha Tau Omega-Sept, 14 




Sigma Gamma Rho-Oct 1-2 


Alpha* Delta-Sept 14-15 




Sigma Kappa-Oct. 5-6 


Beta Sigma Psi-Sept 15 




Sigma Nu-Oct 6 


Beta Theta Pi-Sept 15-16 




Sigma Phi Epsilon-Oct. 6 


Chi Omega- Sept. 16-17 




Sigma Sigma Sigma-Oct 7-8 


Delta Delta Delta-Sept 17-18 




Tau Kappa Epsilon-Oct 8 


Delta Sigma Phi-Sept. 18 




Theta Xi-Oct 8 


Delta Sigma Theta-Sept 18 




Triangle-Oct. 9 


Delta Tau Delta- Sept. 21 




Zeta Phi Beta-Oct 9 


Delta Upsilon-Sept. 21 




Boyd-Oct 9 


FarmHouse-Sept. 21 




Clovia-Oct 12 


Gamma Phi Beta-Sept. 21-22 




Edwards-Oct 12 


Kappa Alpha Psi-Sept 22 




Fotd-Oct 12 


Kappa Alpha Theta-Sept. 22-23 




Goodnaw-Oct 13 


Kappa Delta-Sept. 23-24 




Haymaker-Oct 13 


Kappa Kappa Gamma- Sept. 24-25 




Marlatt-Oct 13 


Kappa Sigma-Sept. 25 




Moore-Oct 14 


Lambda Chi Alpha-Sept 25 




Putnam-Oct 14 


Omega Psi Phi-Sept 28 




Smith-Oct 15 


Phi Beta Sigma-Sept 28 




Smurmwaite-Oet 15 


Phi Delta Theta-Sept 28 




Van Zile-Oct 15 


Phi Gamma Delta- Sept. 29 




Wcst-Oct 15 


Phi Kappa Tau-Sept 29 




OffCampus-Oct 16-30 


Picture yourself in the 1993 


Royal Purple yearbook. 


Photos will be taken from 8:30 


If you 


are a greek member, but 


a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. 


live in a residence hall or off 


in the K-State Union Room 209. 


campus, please have your photo 




taken 


with your fraternity or so- 




ronry. 





KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



i: 



September 2, 1 992 Q 



Rain simulator helps research erosion 




Hans Kok, assistant professor of agronomy, demonstrates the rain simulator at the Research Farms north of campus on Agronomy Field 
Day this summer. The simulator saturates plots of ground to be used In studying runoff. 



K-State 
agronomy may 

build unit part 

KATIE WALKER 

Col leg un 

A rainfall simulator may soon 
be built at K-State. 

Hans Kok, assistant professor 
of agronomy, said the agronomy 
department could have its own 
simulator by next semester. It is 
estimated to cost $25,000. 

One simulator, on loan from the 
University of Nebraska, toured 
Kansas last month to demonstrate 
the disastrous effects of erosion 
and what can be done to slow the 
process down 

"Once the proposal to get 
funding goes through the Ag 
Experiment Station and is 



approved, we can go ahead and 
build the equipment," said Philip 
Barnes, research and agricultural 
engineer. He will be constructing 
the simulator with the Kansas 
River Valley Experiment Field in 
Topeka. 

The simulator can produce 
storms of 2.5 inches an hour, 
which are normal-size storms for 
Kansas. Even the same size of 
raindrops can be duplicated with 
special nozzles. 

But the purpose of the simulator 
is not to create an exact replica of 
a Kansas storm. Its main uses arc 
as a research tool and an extension 
toot, Barnes said. 

Research is being done on 
preventing erosion and 
determining the effectiveness of 
pesticides and other chemicals. 

As an extension tool, the 



simulator is demonstrated to 
various groups in Kansas. "Seeing 
the pesticide run-off is sometimes 
better than just being told about 
it," Barnes said. 

The 1990 Farm Bill required 
fanners to reach a tolerable level 
of erosion by 1995. Kok said. Five 
tons of soil per acre each year is 
considered a tolerable level of 
erosion. Current levels are 20 tons 
per acre. 

Crop residue, which is 
everything left over after harvest, 
is usually plowed under, Kok said 
By keeping the residue, farmers 
can reduce erosion by protecting 
their soil from the rain. 

"Farmers should leave the crop 
residue, because rain will fall on 
it." Kok said. "It acts like a pillow 
to keep w atcr from hitting the soil 
directly. 



"Hundreds of years ago. the 
area of Operation Desert Storm 
was the most fertile area in the 
world, but they let it erode, and 
they lost it. Now it's one big 
sandbox. And that's the United 
States in the future," he said. 

If farmers do nothing to prevent 
erosion. Kok said in about 50 
years, the topsoil will be lost and 
I ields will go down drastically. 

Erosion removes topsoil, which 
is better than subsoil for farming. 
Topsoil has all the organic matter 
and fertility, can hold water and is 
a good place for roots to grow, 
Kok said. Subsoil is like a "baby 
soil" that has not developed 
completely. 

Once the topsoil is gone, it 
could lake tens of thousands of 
vears to get it back. Kok said. 



Bush visit not impressive, Louisiana resident says 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 crop damage. He also went to a "I'm not impressed," said one food more than seeing the 

battered sugar-cane farm, food distribution center, where he volunteer, Bryan Thompson, 31, of president." 

announcing he would not raise the shook hands with volunteers and Lafayette, La. "The people in line 

sugar-cane import quota despite people lined up for free groceries. out front probably appreciate the 



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Medical patches 
becoming popular 
treatment program 



Prescriptions 
help wide variety 
of ailments 

wromiAuicw 

Ccrikfiin 

Patchwork no longer refers 10 
only quilting or fixing the hole in 
the knee of your pants. 

It has become the answer for 
daily prescription takers and those 
are trying to kick the nicotine habit. 

Medical patches are becoming a 
popular choice for people who 
suffer from high blood pressure, 
motion 



sickness, 
heart 
disease and 
nicotine 
craving. 
The patches 
can also 
provide 
relief to 



"You must 
stop 

smoking for 
a patch to 



DR. KEITH WRIGHT 



women 
experiencing health problems due 
to menopause. Instead of taking 
daily pills, or struggling to quit 
smoking, medical patches offer 
daily medication at a controlled, 
steady rate, delivered through the 
skin. 

In 1984, the nicotine patch was 
demonstrated showing it was 
capable of producing nicotine 
serum levels comparable to those 
received from smoking. Today, the 
nicotine patch is the highest-selling 
medical patch, with over 200 



million three-month programs sold 
since they were" approved in 
December. 

The patch, which is applied on a 
hairless part of ihe body, controls 
the proper dosage through the MM 
of a porous rate controller below 
the drug reservoir. The patch may 
be switched daily or weekly, 
depending on its purpose. 

Dr. Keith Wright, a family 
physician, said he has 50 to 75 
patients who are using the nicotine 
patch and smoking-cessation 
program to beat the cigarette habit. 

He said his patients have been 
satisfied with the patches, 

A smalt number of them have 
returned with complaints of skin 
irritation where the cigarette 
substitute patch is applied or 
nightmares due to the nicotine 
received during the night. Thi> 
problem may also be remedied in 
the future with an 18-hour patch 
which administers the drug onlv 
during the day. 

"If I prescribe the patches to a 
patient, I also encourage anyone 
using them to attend a smoking- 
cessation program, which acts as 
moral support. You must stop 
smoking for the patch to work." 
Wright said. 

The only problem Wright MQrt 
the patches impose is their cost. 
Whether they take the place of 
nicotine or high blood pressure 
pills, they may cost more than $100 
a month. 



•• You 've got to spend 
money to moke money. 
It pays to advertise in the 

COLLEGIAN S)S) 



NEWS YOU 
CAN USE 



C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 




SI. 2 J Pitchers 

Clanki & Denason (Down Under) 
raXlB4Mt CENTO 776-1)11 



COMING 

EVENTS 




VJ& 



The Incomparable Red Stars 

Red Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble 

Sunday, September 13, 3 p.m.* t 
The Russians are coming* Moscow fends Manhattan a 
company of 130 for a concert of traditional songs, (oik 
dances, and martial and classical music Dun t miss this 
group's first North American tour 

Ticket* »10-$25 

Marcus Roberts and Ellis Maraads 

Duo pianists 

Friday, September 2$, 8 p m V 

Two jaii stars take center stage (or an evening of 

improvisation inspired by greats like Ellington, Monk. 

and Jelly Roll Morton 

Tickets S7 50-$t 5 



Dania Azteca de Anahuac 

A "Musk of the America*" production of the 

Santa Fe Chamber Musk Festival 

Sunday, September 17, 3 p.m.* 

Witness a fire dance performed on glowing coals and 

the fascinating ceremonial dances »/ the Artec*. Mayas, 

and Toilets. 




Tickets: $7-$ M 



Lend Me a Tenor 

Friday, October 13, 1 p.m.* 

Sneak behind the scenes of a gala opera tot an evening 
of Marx Brothers-style shenanigans. The laughter is 
nonstop in this outrageous Tony Award-winning lance 



Tickets S7-S18 



Call 532-6428 or come to the McCain box office 

on the Kansas State University campus, Manhattan. 

Boa office hours: noon to 5 p.m. weekdays, from I p m before weekend matinees. 
from 3 p.m. before weekend evenings. Tickets also available (with sen kv charge) at 
Manhattan Town Center Customer Service Desk, K-State Union Bookstore, and ITR 
(Fort Riley). Persona with disabilities call 532-A428 

' I'mntnl in part by the Hamas Arts CummitMon. a Mir agency, and the National Endow- 
ment tor tlie Aits, a federal agency. 

t Corporate support has been provide d by Union National Bank and Trust Co 
1 Supported by Ihe Jeanne Will* Durfce* Memorial Fund. 
AH performances are vipporM by the kSUM Rue Art* Fee , 



M-C-C-A-l-N 



■■■■■■IM ^aa*p ,■>.».— - tf.| 



10 »•*•■"*•■■ 2, 1992 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PiKaps 

to get 

new house 



CONTINUED FROM MGE 1 

said Mike Howard, senior in 
accounting and Pi Kappa Phi 
president. 

Howard said the members have 
maintained a positive attitude 



during the aftermath of the Are. 

"1 think we just know you have 
to take the good with the bad and 
push forward," Howard said. 

Membership in the fraternity has 
increased by IS since the fire. 



bringing total membership to 61 
men, Howard said. 

One advantage, he said, is that 
the situation has forced everyone to 
take on more responsibility and get 
more involved in the fraternity. 



TO THE EDITOR 



may be brought to Kedzie 116. 



A LOT CAN BE SAID ABOUT 
A LITTLE BIT OF SPACE: 


COLLEGIAN 


Thty 
Work 


ClassADS 






E 



SSENTIALS 



He feels like heel; she wants relationship 



■ 




This is something new to the 
Collegian for all readers to use. If you 
have a personal question — a 
question about anything for that 
matter — or maybe you just want to 
get something off of your chest, 
please let me know. 

I'll do my best to find an answer, 
give advice or just simply be a good 
listener. 

DEAR CASSANDRA. 

I'm a junior at a small Midwestern 
university. I never thought anything 
like this would happen to me, but here 
goes. 

A few months back, I bumped into 
an old female friend at my sister's 
wedding. One thing led to another, 
and before I could figure out what 
was happening, we were back at her 
place having sex. 

I enjoyed the sex, but I now have a 
problem. She keeps writing and 
calling, and I have no desire for any 
type of commitment. 

I feel like a heel, but I don't 
believe I've ever led her to believe 
that anything like a long-term 
relationship would happen. 

My question is how to let her 



down gently. 

1 like her a lot, but the idea of 
being married or even committed at 
this point in my life makes me 
violently ill. Please help. 

Signed, 

S.A., homy and single 
DEARSA, 

Once you tell her the wonderful 
news, I think you are going to feel 
much worse from the kick in the groin 
you'll receive. 

You've got a problem, all right — 
actually three - and your first one 
isn't trying to figure out who is going 
to be your next one- night stand. 

You say you feel like a heel? Well 
take a hint, buster. You are, and that 
is only your first problem. 

The best way to prevent this 
situation from happening again, if 
casual sex is what you are looking 
for, is to lay down the ground rules 
with your partner before you have 
sex. 

This way, everything is up front 
and honest. However, some states 
view that as solicitation if money is 
involved and will throw you in jail. 

More importantly, though, unless 
you have been living on another 



planet, you must surely be aware that 
due to AIDS, casual sex is very risky 
business nowadays. This accounts for 
your second problem. 

Let's be realistic. 

It is obvious your chances of 
finding a willing partner (who is not a 
hooker) in the fashion I just described 
are very slim indeed. 

That is why I can't accept your 
excuse that you didn't give her any 
indication of wanting something more 
permanent in a relationship. 

To many women (and men), the 
sex act IS an indication of something 
serious, and I believe you knew 
beforehand that any mention of NOT 
wanting a serious relationship would 
most likely ruin your chances for 
lovemaking. 

Therefore. I think you deserve to 
feel like a heel. 

If you continue with this sort of 
sly, irresponsible behavior, signing 
yourself "horny and single" will 
become a permanent situation — 
which is your third problem. 

As for how to let Ms, "Fatal 
Attraction" down gently, you are too 
late. Take your medicine like a big 
boy, and just tell her straight out. 



Let me know how it turns out. 

In the meantime, look on the bright 
side — after you tell her, you will 
never need to worry about finding 
work again. The Vienna Boys Choir 
is always in need of a few good 
sopranos. 

DEAR CASSANDRA, 

I have a feeling that people talk about 
me behind my back. How do I 
confront these people, and what 
should 1 say to them? 

D.T., K -State senior 

DEARD.T, 

People have been talking about 
other people since time began. It is 
called "gossip," and there is nothing 
you can do about it outside of making 
sure you do not do it, 

Confrontation will do nothing to 
stop it, and it may even aggravate it 
more. My best advice is to ignore it. 

However, what concerns me is 
your apparent anxiety over it and the 
uncomfortable feelings you have. 

People who are secure in their 
beliefs and abilities rarely worry 
about idle gossip. They know that 
their actions and accomplishments 



speak for themselves. 

Try concentrating more on your 
daily activities and those things you 
do well or make you feel good about 
yourself. 

Think positive, and strive to 
develop a good mental attitude about 
yourself and life. Embrace those 
things you can do well, and accept 
those things you cannot do. 

If in everything you try your 
hardest, then you have nothing to be 
ashamed of, least of all the jealous 
prattle of gossips. 

Letters to the Cassandra Duvraux nay be 
submitted In person or by nail to the Kansas 
Stale Collegian, c/o Cassandra Duveaui, 
KedzJe 114. Manhattan. Kan. 66506. 

Cassandra rescrtn (be right In edit the 
content for Ihe purpose of conserving space. 
Unless other* be specified, all letter* will b* 
open to the public 

Correspond eoce designated as "ornate" 
or ■'ni'i Tor publication" will be maintained 
in Ihe ftrictest confidence. 

The advice presented in this column Is 
soielt the opinion of ihe coJumnki and does 
not reflect the opinion of the Collegian or K- 
Statc. 



DOUBLE BARRELED 



DARVl BLASI 



THE STRIP 



Indeed of c en *n lentil} 
leaving, I "Trunk I II hang 
around ^ +ake uw>r utiK+t* 
tel+fi, and moke Sure m 




BATMAN AND ROflrVS IAST ADVENTURE 

DAVID SWEARINGEN 







tOCULP PHJ.vlfTfL'T eXPLXlH 
TVE OA W fttNT OF US rUNG'MS 

10 mz irrmi mtfKi uki that. 



ONE DAY TO LIVE 



Day 6 — An identity is revealed 

In a perfect non-Swahili accent. Ogre 
Kombutt says, "Does the name Vladimir 
Groinpull mean anything to anyone here?" 

"Daddy?!" blurts out Delilah, as she 
tries to pull her eyes off Wolfgang and on 
to Ogre Kombutt to give her the iciest 
stare she has ever given anyone since the 
mechanic at the Yugo dealership when he 
told her thai he couldn't fix the cigarette 
lighter in her car. 

"I can't ... I just can't ... I really can't 
believe that Daddy would do this to me. 
He promised me," cries a sobbing Delilah, 
as her quivering voice tails off into a 
mouthful of unwanted phlegm. 

"You can't believe what?" demands 
Sputnik anxiously, knowing full well that 
it was her father who gave their location 
away, but wanting to hear her say it 
anyway. 

"That ... *sob* ... that Daddy wou